Yabbies

Ash

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In summer these little critters are in abutance. All you need is is a bit of meat on a string. Not too much fat on the the meat or it will float. They live in rivers, creeks, dams. Actually a lot of fresh water sources. They taste a bit muddy but still a lot like prawns. High in protien and low in fat. In one day you could easily collect a bucket full if fishing in the right place. Fun for the whole family.
 

Blake

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Agreed Ash,

love yabbies, top feed, abundant and easy to catch

Tones of blue marron yabbies in my creeks and dam in Mudgee. More in the creeks actually. You wont find them much in the winter or when the creeks are low as they burrow into the creek bed and aestivate and can survive like this for years even. Really tough little blokes.

I use pots on my property but make sure its not a trap that will harm other wildlife. Normally I get anywhere from 1-2 to 10 in a pot at a time. I usually bait them up with an old skungy bit of off cut meat that i get form the butcher for nothing and put them in close to the bank around 2 - 4 hours from sun down. Let em soak until 2 hours or so after dark and pull them up. Overnight works too but they tend to get a bit rowdy with each other.

Ive done alot of crabbing with my old man and I follow what he taught me. I'm not aware of a size limit for yabbies but I throw any small ones back, regardless of sex. I always check them for eggs and if they have a clump they go straight back too of course.
 

Blake

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Another tip. If you are out bush and don't have a trap with you. You can knock them up all kinds of ways. You can weave one from plant material or use a hollow log with a stone at the base with the meat ties to the stone and leave it upright against the bank. Check often.

You can also bundle a large bunch of sticks around some meat bind it up with something and chuck that in the water. They will try and climb into the sticks the get the meat and get caught. Works with freshwater prawns too. Check these traps every hour or two
 

Corin

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when I was travelling around NZ I stayed with a Maori family, they caught yabbies by breaking off a branch of a manuka bush (which has lots of fine twiggy branches) and tieinga piece of meat in the middle and laying them in the lake.... lift them from the water after a couple of hours and shake the yabbies out and re set.... worked really well!
 
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Bartnmax

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Yabbies can also be caught just by tying a piece of meat onto some line & throwing it in (anchor the line first tho)
Wait 10 minutes & then slowly draw the string (& yabbie) out.
When the yabbie is getting near to the edge of the water (but still in the water) cup your hand behind him & give it a quick flick up the bank.
You can then pick him up before he makes his way back down the bank & into the water.
It's a bit slower then using a pot but can still produce a good feed.

If using 'Opera house' nets you should cast them out as if your throwing a frisbee back hand.
That way the pot will land right way up & not upside down.

Note that use of Opera house nets in Victoria, in or adjacent to public water ways is prohibited.
However, they can be legally used on private waterways (farm dams etc).
I would add however that they should never be left for too long without checking, especially if used in flowing water ways as other animlas such as platipus', etc can get caught & drown in them (yeah I know Plati's are marsupials).
Here's the catch (excuse the pun), whilst dams on farms are considered to be private waterways where opera house nets can be legally used, most flowing waters such as creeks, rivers etc are very rarely privately owned, even though they may pass through private property. In the vast majority of situations such water ways are still considered to be public water ways as they are owned by the various water authorities. So never assume you can legally use an opera house net in a river or creek just because it's located on private property.

Drop pots are legal to use provided you meet the requirements of the relevent regulations (name tags on pots, etc).

Bill A.
 

Coda

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Hi Bartnmax
You described my childhood, the bait the line (with old meat) and slowly drag it back, did many a yabie that way. Then I'd sling into a bucket of clean water for maybe a couple of hours and cook up. Also so on the larger dams a cage, maybe 4ft each side with chicken wire and inward holes on each side (starting large and getting smaller) with a chook head wired in the centre, leave overnight on then haul back in. Big feast.
And thinking about this was way long ago, check your state laws first.
 
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Wave Man

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just to wet your whistle
[video=youtube;6GgC1xcS6Jk]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GgC1xcS6Jk[/video]
 

Corin

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[video=youtube;-gQ6182z660]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gQ6182z660&feature=plcp[/video]
 

koalaboi

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The restricted area for yabby traps in NSW is huge.

Virtually the eastern half of the state is off limits to protect the platypus...and I reckon there's not a person on this site who doesn't agree.

Cheers,

KB
 

swampy99

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[video=youtube;-gQ6182z660]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gQ6182z660&feature=plcp[/video]
Good skills on using your boys knife to stab the can. That way your blade is still kept sharp. Must ask my mate to use his knife when I want to blunt it. :_risata:
 

Bartnmax

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No doubt a typo - Platypus are Monotremes ... :;):
Yeah I wasn't getting overly specific for the sake of the thread.
Monotremes are basically mammals that lay eggs rather than birth live young & as such the Platy is a Monotreme as opposed to a Marsupial.
The only other Monotreme in Australia is the Echidna (as far as I am aware - please correct me if I'm wrong).

Billl.
 

Becki

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well not yabbies but as a kid my dad used to take me prawning when we holidayed up at Nambucca, nothing like the taste of fresh caught prawns after you've boiled them up at midnight!
 

Browny

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Used to chase Yabbies (Gilgies over here) as a kid, dont get back out to the wheatbelt much anymore, so havent had a feed for awhile.

I would love to get a feed of Cherabin though, but its a bit of a drive up north from here to catch em. LINK


Some more info on freshwater crays from the web, so it must be true.....


Australia is home to the world's two largest freshwater crayfish – the Tasmanian giant freshwater crayfish Astacopsis gouldi, which can achieve a mass of up to 5 kilograms (11 lb) and is found in the rivers of northern Tasmania,[11] and the Murray crayfish Euastacus armatus, which can reach 2 kilograms (4.4 lb) and is found in much of the southern Murray-Darling basin.
 

Michael

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mate if you come down my way I will show you a few ponds with em in
 
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