What toys are you waiting for???

Randall

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I just won an ebay bid on a knife - it's a twosun ts68. M390 steel, TC4 titanium scales, under 2" blade. $72 delivered including gst. Apparently knives from this company have been tested by a youtuber for advertised M390 and D2 steel and titanium scales, and the steel has been as advertised. They also tested hardness which came back as 60 for the M390.

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Wave Man

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mate they look great. One thing, I wish companies would run their M390 at HRC62+, the steel can sustain such a hardness and it actually hits a goldilocks spot at around HRC62 and actualizes it potential.
 

Randall

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mate they look great. One thing, I wish companies would run their M390 at HRC62+, the steel can sustain such a hardness and it actually hits a goldilocks spot at around HRC62 and actualizes it potential.
Yes, I know. I haven't seen anything like the higher recommended numbers for any given steel. Even Bradford use 60-61 for their M390, which probably means mostly 60. And they are "double tempered and cryo treated", so they do put some effort into it. Most knives seem to be on the soft side for the steel they use. Maybe they err on the side of caution? Surely there must be a good reason? Do they temper before or after the grind? I imagine if they temper after, it would be difficult and the blade would not be evenly tempered. Maybe a custom knife? :) You might be interested in this waveman; there are a few knife manufacturers in the higher numbers.
 
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Bloffy13

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I was at a street fair last week and a few places were running garage sales. I got this pack for $10. It's all leather. The buckles, straps and zip are all good. Didn't even haggle.
It's branded Outgear and made in Australia. It has one large bucket and a medium-sized pocket in the front.


It sits nicely on my back and I was amazed at how much I can fit in it.

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I emptied my Sabre 65 (which is nowhere near full I might add) and squeezed as much as I could from it into the new pack.
I would say it hasn't been used in a while, given the amount of dust on it, yet the leather was still supple. I would love to know from you guys the best way to look after it. I think maybe dubbin or something .
Anywho, below is what I put in it.

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From the top left: an army ration pack (not sure where that came from, lol), Hennessy Hammock and Tier Gear hootchie, pegs etc, underquilt, toilet paper, knife sharpener, spork, Sea To Summit collapsible cup, a (noisy as hell) Jetboil knockoff, the repurposed HH bag has my toiletries, a cooking grill, a cutting board (the red rectangle), a spatula and tube for blowing coals, a shemagh, a first aid kit, two straps to hang my pack from trees, two Sawyer water bottles, a length of hootchie cord, a pack cover and a basic mother's kit. It's all sitting on a summer weight sleeping bag.

This would be good for 24-48 hours but with the weather getting colder, it might have to wait a bit (or I just spend a cold night, lol)
The only things I couldn't fit was my clothing bag - which has a beanie, spare socks, a thermal and a mozzie head net - and my winter weight down sleeping bag.
So, overall, pretty impressive.

I would like to add some sort of detachable waist belt with extra pockets, a water bottle, a Sawyer mini (anyone know of an Australian supplier offering at a reasonable price?) my belt knife etc. That way if I go away from my pack, I will still have my basics (old habits die hard).
Any other suggestions, let me know. (If this is in the wrong place, let me know)
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Randall

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Olive oil with a rag. Dubbin makes leather too soft and it stretches. I been using olive oil on high end walking boots, as well as everything else including wooden scales on pocket knives. It lasts a whole winter on my walking boots, even after getting soaked through and drying out multiple times, the boots are still conditioned. I've never had this with dubbin or snow seal or any of the silicone dressings.
 
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Edward

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I was at a street fair last week and a few places were running garage sales. I got this pack for $10. It's all leather. The buckles, straps and zip are all good. Didn't even haggle.
It's branded Outgear and made in Australia. It has one large bucket and a medium-sized pocket in the front.


It sits nicely on my back and I was amazed at how much I can fit in it.

View attachment 26258

I emptied my Sabre 65 (which is nowhere near full I might add) and squeezed as much as I could from it into the new pack.
I would say it hasn't been used in a while, given the amount of dust on it, yet the leather was still supple. I would love to know from you guys the best way to look after it. I think maybe dubbin or something .
Anywho, below is what I put in it.

View attachment 26259

From the top left: an army ration pack (not sure where that came from, lol), Hennessy Hammock and Tier Gear hootchie, pegs etc, underquilt, toilet paper, knife sharpener, spork, Sea To Summit collapsible cup, a (noisy as hell) Jetboil knockoff, the repurposed HH bag has my toiletries, a cooking grill, a cutting board (the red rectangle), a spatula and tube for blowing coals, a shemagh, a first aid kit, two straps to hang my pack from trees, two Sawyer water bottles, a length of hootchie cord, a pack cover and a basic mother's kit. It's all sitting on a summer weight sleeping bag.

This would be good for 24-48 hours but with the weather getting colder, it might have to wait a bit (or I just spend a cold night, lol)
The only things I couldn't fit was my clothing bag - which has a beanie, spare socks, a thermal and a mozzie head net - and my winter weight down sleeping bag.
So, overall, pretty impressive.

I would like to add some sort of detachable waist belt with extra pockets, a water bottle, a Sawyer mini (anyone know of an Australian supplier offering at a reasonable price?) my belt knife etc. That way if I go away from my pack, I will still have my basics (old habits die hard).
Any other suggestions, let me know. (If this is in the wrong place, let me know)
Cheers
Bloffy


Sweet find, mate(y) Happy to hear the gear all fits and colour is good too.

I have used Dubin on my leather and on saddles for years and swear by it. Its specifically made to treat leather in Australia. IMHO, I would be careful of using some natural oils on leather that is likely to get wet, like your pack, as I have heard it can go rancid. But then again, if some people can't afford Dubin or don't like it, hey, use olive oil I guess :rolleyes:


Hey, we have the same first aid kit
 
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MongooseDownUnder

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Olive oil with a rag. Dubbin makes leather too soft and it stretches. I been using olive oil on high end walking boots, as well as everything else including wooden scales on pocket knives. It lasts a whole winter on my walking boots, even after getting soaked through and drying out multiple times, the boots are still conditioned. I've never had this with dubbin or snow seal or any of the silicone dressings.
Olive oil can go rancid though and then you gear will smell pretty horrible.
 

Wave Man

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Yes, I know. I haven't seen anything like the higher recommended numbers for any given steel. Even Bradford use 60-61 for their M390, which probably means mostly 60. And they are "double tempered and cryo treated", so they do put some effort into it. Most knives seem to be on the soft side for the steel they use. Maybe they err on the side of caution? Surely there must be a good reason? Do they temper before or after the grind? I imagine if they temper after, it would be difficult and the blade would not be evenly tempered. Maybe a custom knife? :) You might be interested in this waveman; there are a few knife manufacturers in the higher numbers.
Reate apparently runs theirs at HRC61, and WE runs it soft (tested they delivered HRC58.7 from memory on one example). I have one knife that when tested had HRC63 on M390.(Tuyaknife Shuriken). When I get a custom M390 flipper made I will have it at HRC63.

I think companies run their steels softer so as the vast majority of end users can resharpen easily.
 

Randall

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Reate apparently runs theirs at HRC61, and WE runs it soft (tested they delivered HRC58.7 from memory on one example). I have one knife that when tested had HRC63 on M390.(Tuyaknife Shuriken). When I get a custom M390 flipper made I will have it at HRC63.

I think companies run their steels softer so as the vast majority of end users can resharpen easily.
To support your belief, I think you're right. I saw a youtuber with a Lion Steel M1 that he could not get sharp. All his other knives were sharp. It was M390, and I suspected it may have been a bit over cooked.
 

Randall

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Olive oil can go rancid though and then you gear will smell pretty horrible.
I've never had that, or heard of it happening when used as a dressing. It has been a popular conditioner for a long time - I didn't invent the idea. I think it originated with high end dress shoes and boots. I even use it on our kitchen table top (it's wood)
 

Edward

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Olive oil can go rancid though and then you gear will smell pretty horrible.

That's what I heard. I found this out when I insisted on treating all the floor board in my house with natural oils. I was going to use linseed oil, but again it can go rancid if it gets wet. Once it does you never really get rid of it. They are spores. I ended up using Tung oil, which doesn't * unlike linseed oil its water resistant. Tung oil is probably the best natural oil I have found. Its centuries old too, so I was a bit late I guess:rolleyes: I want to make up my own wood 7 leather feeders. There are a few on you tube who do. I just haven't got around to it yet. Until then I was using Otter Wax - very expensive shit, from the USA, but it is heavenly stuff. What I can tell you is I think it has tung oil in it as I can smell it. Tung oil is not cheap either, but it goes a long way if mixed with other oils. If I ever made an oil cloth tarp I would definitely have tung oil on it & some other oils. Canubarua wax is a good one too but VERY expensive, an exotic oil. It use to be cheap, not now. The thing is you don't need much of this oil at all and it makes a huge durability difference apparently and smells wonderful. If you have any bone collections or tortise shells, olive oil is a great natural feeder for those things. Or so I read.

PS. The new Ti cup is awesome! Great it has graduation measurements too. It should come in handy on mobile trips due to the weight advantage (y)
 

Edward

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My German Army Mountain Troops Bundeswehre Jerbirgsjager 33L Rucksack is good, but after advice from members and my own experiences, I really needed a bigger back for 3+ day adventures and lifetime expeditions.

I am therefore seriously considering purchasing this Genuine Swedish Army LK35 Rucksack. I found one brand new in Sweden. I have wanted one of these since the 1980's, but for years I did not know what they were called, nor how to identify what the 'exact' real deal model of this pack was, let alone where to get one. I do now.

I may do a review on the LK35 when I have some experience with it, but from what I know of it, it is a minimalist, yet seriously capable & easy to use expedition pack! It is also very versatile and doesn't visually scream 'military' if you know what I mean. I like that:)



 

Randall

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I've just ordered a solo stove with pot. Like most here, in the past I've made hobo stoves out of big and small coffee tins. The first one I made burnt through jarrah decking in 5 mins just from the heat through the bottom of the tin! The solo stove is jacketed so that heated air rises up through jets at the rim, which fuels a secondary burn. Like an afterburner on a jet maybe? It also looks reasonably wind proof. Here's a comparison here of 3 hobo type stoves. Bought it through amazon.com.au. It will be fun to use a fixed blade (which rarely gets used) to nick thumb size diameter sticks into 3" sections to be broken, or if car based I'll take the cleaver along :). I'm going to use cheesecloth bags to hold ground coffee as a sort of coffee bag. It's not something I'd take on extended walks - I tend to not take a stove at all if it's a week or longer. I envision this as a "pullover and make some coffee" type of thing, or just on day walks for fun. I think I get 8% of the cost to use in a shopback account - shopback has various rates for various amazon categories, it's 8% for "sports, fitness and outdoors". I'm not recommending them; this is the first time I've used them, and I did have to give my real phone number (something I rarely do).
 
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Walker

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RE: 'What toys are you waiting for?'

Well, a BIG toy I'm waiting for, and most likely will be waiting for sometime, is a future model of the Land Cruiser 70 Series where all the problems are fixed e.g. the rear/front tracking issue, alternator position, etc. I REALLY want one of these as my 'Retirement' vehicle, so Toyota better get their finger out and fix things!
 

Randall

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26275

My bradford guardian arrived just now. It's the same as in the picture above, just different steel (Vanadis 4E). I was prepared to pay the tax, but that didn't happen. I have to also say that Nebo knives got back to me with a price on exactly what I wanted for $7.00 less than what Bradford themselves charged me. Nebo knives are now the authorised Australian dealer for Bradford, and they still have that 10% discount for bushcraftoz. I would have gone through Nebo even if they were more expensive, but I didn't want to miss out on the limited vanadis 4e steel run. The knife is shaving sharp and looks good. I gave it a strop and oiled the edge. I also received the leather sheath, as well as the kydex sheath I ordered. The leather sheath is well made and looks good and is horizontal carry. I gave it a light coat of olive oil, which even in this cold weather has nearly disappeared into the leather. The kydex sheath is very well made, but was way too tight. I trickled some hot water out of the kettle over the parts of the sheath that lock the handle in - then sat the handle in that area at the widest part of the handle to open it a bit. I was able to incrementally loosen the sheath this way - I did the hot water trickle and sheath stretch thing twice. I've seen online that people use a flame to heat up the kydex, but it looks as though the flame denatures the kydex a bit. The hot water hasn't changed the appearance of the kydex at all. I have set up the kydex sheath as horizontal carry too - the knife is small enough and light enough for this. I'm glad I ordered the flat handle scales - they feel good. Bradford also have rounded handle scales but they looked too round to me. The jimping on top of the blade above the finger choil is very good. It feels and looks like a good tough knife, and is really more usable to me than my other fixed blade which I can only carry vertical, and therefore not concealed. Even in the bush, I'd rather them concealed.
 
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Thrud

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I’ve used the missus’ hairdryer for kydex, works well.
Nice looking knife have fun!
 

Randall

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I’ve used the missus’ hairdryer for kydex, works well.
Nice looking knife have fun!
Yes, I imagine that would work well too without denaturing the kydex. My uncivilized partner has no such thing :D, and I'm no metro. It's the first time I've played with kydex. The area I worked with was only about a square cm on both sides of the sheath. It was easy to apply heat to the the area I wanted with the water; a hairdryer would have done just as well.
 
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