What makes a good Bushcraft Rucksack?

darren

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To say they neglect thier equipment because they chose certain items you would I believe in most cases be wrong, No offence was taken and no offence was not intended by this statement
I will try and explain my earlier "better things to do than look after their gear" statement. It was not a shot, but i was meaning in the job someone in the military is asked to do, the last thing i would imagine they would want to worry about being careful with a no3 zipper, or something similar.Getting into your sleeping bag with boots on is another example.Their gear has to be super heavy duty. I have never been in the military but i would imagine being in the field would be stressful enough.
I know what your saying about off track. Thats why i prefer small narrow packs to streamline scrub travel, because thats the hiking i like.

The dyneema fabric mentioned earlier is one of the strongest available and there was a shortage a few years ago apparently due to filling US military orders.
 
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Greatbloke

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As much as I love my green pack that I have pictured above, it's not always good in thick bush, not just because of the possibility of catching branches on the side, but from walking under low branches. A branch that most people would duck their head under with out thinking much about it, requires me to bend at the knees or waist. That might be why external framed packs are not that popular in Australia, and more popular in the USA with well worn hiking tracks.
 

Templar

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MD55, I would say the "Scotch" pockets would be best, since you can slide gear behind them, an alternative is also to stitch them on three sides as mini dump pockets, seems to be popular with the US BC comunity for putting their folding saw and larger knife in.
 
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Dusty Miller

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Hi Dusty,
I'd agree with you on the silnylon and cuben packs not being great for offtrack, but the spectra based ones, about as thin as most storm throats on trad packs handle it fine. Even sandstone abrasion.
Hi Wentworth, Got any faves in 20-30 L ?
 

Wentworth

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Hi Dusty, my dyneema pack is made by these guys http://www.zpacks.com/backpacks.shtml but they've now moved onto a cuben/ nylon hybrid which is meant to be even better.
I used to own a dyneema golite pack which was great. The Jam http://www.golite.com/Jam-35L-Pack-Unisex-P46811.aspx seems to be very popular, though I haven't tried this one myself. Don't know whether golite ship internationally, so you may have to find a US retailer who will ship it.
 

Greatbloke

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Hi Dusty, my dyneema pack is made by these guys http://www.zpacks.com/backpacks.shtml but they've now moved onto a cuben/ nylon hybrid which is meant to be even better.
I used to own a dyneema golite pack which was great. The Jam http://www.golite.com/Jam-35L-Pack-Unisex-P46811.aspx seems to be very popular, though I haven't tried this one myself. Don't know whether golite ship internationally, so you may have to find a US retailer who will ship it.

Your Dyneema's nice and light, Wentworth, have you had it long enough to comment on the UV stability? I've been thinking about a golight for a long time, that one looks pretty good.
 

Blake

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My current old sack doesn't have side pockets, one of the things I need to do is sew on some webbing so I can add removable side pockets. the side pockets then become the bumbag, but much smaller than those UK pockets, only 6 litres each.

One thing to consider, if you have side pockets do you prefer removable or Scotch pockets? Scotch pockets are those that have the sleeve, and are stitched along the sides only; behind which you can shove long poles or skis, removable pockets are good the the " possibles" without which you ( a good "Bushman" ) should never leave camp
Moondog. If I understand what your saying then I think my pack has scotch pockets? because they attach with zips either side of the pocket. I have often slipped things behind them. See the image below:

Templar can probably confirm either way for me because he has the same pack.



Also its packed away now but im pretty sure the side pockets have a loop for a belt so you can use them like a possible. Not that I have done that yet so I cant remember.
 

Moondog55

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Scotch pockets are permanently attached
I find they work well if you need to carry long stuff like tent poles or skis.
I once owned a Berghaus "Geant" pack, a military design, copy of the British 44 pattern which was itself a copy of a modern ( for 1944 ) walking pack and very similar in design to the German "Mountain" pack but much larger.
That particular pack had huge side pockets, similar in design and size to those detachable Berghaus pockets you carry on a yoke Blake. If those had been Scotch pockets the sack would have been much better.
That rucksac was designed as a multi-use bag, it could be carried with a light load on its own or used on a pack frame.
There was much debate about the 44 pattern webbing but the basic design of the rucksack was in many ways better for walking and bushcraft
 

Dusty Miller

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Wentworth

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Your Dyneema's nice and light, Wentworth, have you had it long enough to comment on the UV stability? I've been thinking about a golight for a long time, that one looks pretty good.
I've only had my current dyneema pack for about 4 or so months, so can't comment on the UV with it, but my previous golite pack had 5 yrs of outdoors use and was still going strong. I got rid of it because the capacity was about double what I needed.
 

Randall

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Which is the best product among those listed in this site? https://11must.com/best-waterproof-backpack/
I don't think many people use waterproof packs - I only know of one person who has a waterproof pack, and I know a lot of bushwalkers. He got benighted once and ever since he has gone overkill with everything - from one extreme to the other šŸ¤£. Do you have a need for a waterproof pack? I live in tassie and walk through winter up high - toughness is more important than waterproofness. We have dolerite rock everywhere - it's really abrasive. Generally, unless you're on popular groomed tracks, toughness and other features take precedence, especially comfort and quality of harness, toughness of zips and attachment points, abrasion resistance, general design, does it sit below your shoulders, not wider than you. I plastic bag stuff that needs to stay dry, other stuff like water proof pants, jacket, water etc can go outside the plastic bag. If you must have waterproof, generally they need to be a roll top design. This means whenever you want something you have to unclip then unroll the top, then roll the top and clip it again when you're finished. No external pockets etc. They are really for water sports - kayaking and walking; something like that.
 

Bloffy13

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I just use a dry bag as needed. Sometimes it's a big one like a liner for everything. Sometimes just the essentials like my spare clothes and/or sleeping bags. I also use a pack cover, especially when the weather will be rough. As Randall said, toughness first.
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Thrud

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Heavy duty garden bin liner with 2 extras, one for rubbish and the second to put over the rucksack at night.
 
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