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What is your preferred colour for bags and packs??

Bartnmax

Richard Proenneke
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Colours.
Two reasons for em - visibility (or desired lack of) to people & to animals.
When hunting, etc I like to use earth tones that mimic as closely as possible the terrain in which I'n hunting.
Camo is great but not absolutely necessary.
It's breaking up outline & making sure there are not patches that an animal can see that are 'un natural' to their view that is important.
White face, hands, etc & un natural refelctions are the worst you can present to animals.
I'd also add that colour selection goes hand in hand with minimalising movement.
Camo colours waved about by a lunatic are a lot easier to see than plain earth tones that are stationary within the bush.
When I want visability (to other people) I have a preference for blaze orange hat/jacket when hunting.
If in snow conditions I think colour is far less important then reflection, but it is still important.
Here contrast is the name of the game I reckon.
Bright blue/green or red/orange is best as it directly contrasts against the white snow.
Black is not a good colour as it occurs naturally in snow areas & is therefore not likely to draw attention.
Most colours are actually hard to see in snow conditions due to the high reflective nature of sunlight off snow.
It causes human eyes to narrow & the ability to pick out colour is therefore reduced.
Hence having an ability to reflect sunlight is far more important as it not only incorperates bright colour (extreme white, etc) but also extreme movement (flashing sunlight is the ultimate in sightable movements).

Bill A.
 

Moondog55

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Bill the other thing to consider in the snow is visibility in dull conditions and some tests were carried out years ago that concluded hot pink and "International Orange" were the colours most easily seen through a mist or in dull conditions.
Interestingly pure white can at times be highly visible in snow, I would guess this is why polar bears are not really white but a kind of pale creamy yellow.
 

Bartnmax

Richard Proenneke
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Yeah I've found the blaze orange to be excelloent in hunting conditions & would imagine it would be likewise in snow.
I tend to think the pure white visability is probably more likely to it's higher reflective ability when compared to the natural dirty white colour of snow.
Movement is far easier to pick up than colour & reflection is basically movement based.
Another issue to consdier is learnign to use one's eye's also.
Peripheral vision is far more accute than is focal vision.
That is to say you will pick up movement within your peripheral vision far eaier & faster then you will when trying to focus on it.
Shotgunners learn this very quickly when shooting clay targets.
If you try to focus on the trap from where the clay is being thrown, by the time you pick it up it's past your focal point & often out of range & unshootable, but if you focus toward where you want to break the clay whilst also training yourself to use your peripheral vison to spot the clay coming out of the trap you'll have far more time to pick it up & shoot it fairly easilly.
The same applies in thw wild. Often peripheral vispon will give you that few microseconds that can make all the difference when trying to see an object, whetyher it be a person moving in the snow, or the minute flicker of a stationary deer's ear.

Once again it comes back to what the native American indians used to say about white men looking a lot & seeing very little.
Eye training is a fascinating subject that involves not only focal & peripheral vision but also learning depth perception & shape identification.

Bill A.
 

Moondog55

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I think that the pure white is more like black being bad camouflage at night, it presents a "Hole" in the background colour.

You are right about eye training, it always to another takes me about a week when shifting form one environment to regain the ability.
I like to play around and modify my gear otherwise I would have left my rucksack alone, but changes in shade and colour make me feel more confident in my ability to hide and that is the important factor in camouflage, it lets me relax which helps me to move slowly and loosely and feel my way around without making too much noise.
I have hunted with people who wear dull colours and bright colours and the dull colours tend to hide much better, but it is usually noise and movement that draw my eye to the area they are in, I see the movement first then "SEE" the shape/colour / form of the other person.
I am amazed more than once how effective blaze orange camo can be at breaking up outlines tho, the contrast between the field and the pattern is huge.
 

bushcamper

Malcolm Douglas
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OD or Brown, RIT dye can be very helpful if you like a pack but not the colour, I have dyed quite a few things with it, including a few packs.

RIT won't work on Polly so it has to be cotton canvas, another natural material or nylon.

I never really found Auscam all that great, I wore it when I had to, not now.
 
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payney

Mors Kochanski
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I have one pack and it's camo realtree that is not auscam I hunt so it works for me and you can't deny that the realtree camo pattern isn't effective
and anything that helps me out while hunting is a good thing in my books. I also wear camo clothes while hunting but never in town I dont want to
be seen as a "poser" I wear camo hunting gear mainly because it is designed for waht I'm doing it keeps me warm and dry the camo is a bonus for
hunting purposes.

When the budget allows I will probably purchase a dedicated bushcraft pack which I would prefer olive drab or tan simply because I do not like to
stand out and just don't like looking at super bright things while out bush but thanks to Templar for the hi vis vest idea I will be adding one to my kit
cheers
 

Tezza

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I prefer OD Green and Olive Drab, as i'm not a big fan of the idea of spending a lot of money on different clothes for different activities, ie: camo for hunting and earthy tones for bushcrafting, when I can just buy twice as many OD Green and Olive Drab and use it for everything.........although, I think some Stoney Creek camo might be on the cards in the future. I take a blaze orange cap and beanie when hunting and as my hunting and bushcrafting gear is one and the same (+ or - a rifle and ammo), i'll still usually have one of them on me when i'm bushcrafting, which could be useful if I run into trouble incase I need to be rescued. I'm not a big fan of bright colours when bushcrafting as, as Templar has said, I don't feel like i'm fitting in with nature as well. I like using canvas and natural fibres as it just feels more in touch with my surroundings.............that might be a bit hippy sounding, but that's how I feel.
 
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