Mammal Vulpes vulpes (Red Fox)

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Scientific Name: Vulpes vulpes

Common Name: Red Fox

Sub-class: Na

Family: Canidae

Other Names: European Red Fox

Distribution: Native to Europe, N.Asia and N. America. Introduced to Australian mainland and spread to all except the tropical areas.
May have spread to Tas recently.

Habitat: Most habitats in Australia except wet tropics and hot arid areas.

Field Notes: Furred canine with elongated body and short legs compared to wild dogs. Bushy tail. Errect ears.
Generally reddish in colour but variations may occur.
Hair raising bark/howl in breeing season. Also bark/yap.
Raises young (kits) in dens (eg. tunnel in earth bank).
Usually hunts at night.

Diet:Opportunistic omnivore, including birds, smal mammals,fish, invertabrates, reptiles, and plant material including berries and fruit.
Has a reputation for stealing chickens and new born lambs.
Serious ecological pest in Australia.

Uses:Fur

Source.Wikipedia article 'Red Fox'

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Red Fox skull (front) compared to Dingo
 
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Dusty Miller

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Drinking from a dam.


Fox(es) revisited this dam on at least three separate nights, possibly more, over a one week period.
 

ninefivefox

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They are extremely cunning, I remember spotlighting for them in WA and they would look down so you lost the reflection of their eyes, play dead and their route selection can be quite amazing.
 

Ticklebellly

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Here is a link ........]
Thanks for the link. Lying in bed this morning listening to a fox that has been visiting up to five times a night. Council installed a trap on Wednesday. The trap will stay, held open, for about a month then we will bait and set. I refused an offer of leg hold traps because I already have quite a collection of native wildlife I want to keep. I also have several wildlife cameras set up to discover and record just what is here. Mr Fox is not wanted.

Ticklebelly
 

AussiePreppers

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Soft-jawed leg hold traps in a dirt hole set will have better success with slim to no chance of harming natives (they are an approved trap), however a fox visiting 5 times a night will probably have no problem going in to a cage for a feed.

In the month it takes for the cage to "work", how many of your natives has it eaten?

All that aside, good on you for getting something done about it :)
 

Ticklebellly

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Soft-jawed leg hold traps in a dirt hole set will have better success with slim to no chance of harming natives.....

In the month it takes for the cage to "work", how many of your natives has it eaten?
These points were discussed at length. Hard call. I will be away for a couple of weeks so the live trap option was taken. I will probably buy my own fox size trap ( I already have two cat size traps) because I am confident another one will move in sometime after we get rid of the current resident. Because wildlife monitoring around here is now constant, as soon as a new fox moves in, if the trap itself is established as part of the environment, trapping any new fox should be easier. I do also have a sometimes problem with unrestrained dogs, too.
 

AussiePreppers

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Have you caught them on your trail cam? Would be good to see some pics...

I wonder if digging a hole somewhere near the cage would help when you go live?
 

Thrud

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Tested out trail cam; there's a lot of stuff out there!MFDC0349.jpgMFDC0395.jpgMFDC0499.jpgMFDC0726.jpgMFDC0789.jpgMFDC0842.jpgMFDC0861.jpg
 

Thrud

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No, the areas I've used are on two bridges over a stream, so act as a natural funnel. The fox(es) seem to cross one then come back over the other. The bridges are about 40m apart. Well, that's my theory! It may be that there are lots of foxes, without another camera it is difficult to say.

At the moment the cameras are out with a lamb liver and wheels pelvis as a lure, so we'll see what crops up.
 
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