Plant Two plants.

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Found a plant Id never seen before near Gympie yesterday, its a banana bush = Tabernaemontana padacaui
Not edible but apparently the fruit was used by Aboriginal people to rub on wounds and sores as an antiseptic.


And these are the pods and seeds of the Queensland narrow leaved bottle tree = Brachychiton rupestris. a close relative of the Kurrajong.
I haven't tried it yet but they can be treated and eaten like kurrajong seeds, they certainly look similar with plenty of fine hairs. In season now.
 

Blake

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Interesting finds mate. Any way to tell the difference between that species and the standard Kurrajong?

Heaps of the farmers here grow Kurrajong in their paddocks for shade trees and cut the branches off in drought for feed. Is that common up your way?
 

Aussie Forager CQ

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Interesting finds mate. Any way to tell the difference between that species and the standard Kurrajong?

Heaps of the farmers here grow Kurrajong in their paddocks for shade trees and cut the branches off in drought for feed. Is that common up your way?
Interesting, I have read stories of farmers doing similar with QLD Bottle tree in hard times, to the point of cutting down the tree. Maybe for that reason there are very few natural stands around up here. Apparently hungry cows would gather around to eat the sweet moist wood chips from the farmers axe. I have chewed the sweet inner bark material and enjoyed it, B. rupestris, almost like coconut.

As far as ID between Kurrajong and QLD Bottle tree (B. rupestris) it is quite easy. Bottle trees are quite a bit smaller, have a pronounced beer belly (bottle shaped trunk) and have narrow leaves, quite different to the standard Kurrajong leaf.
 
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bear foot bowhunter

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Interesting, I have read stories of farmers doing similar with QLD Bottle tree in hard times, to the point of cutting down the tree. Maybe for that reason there are very few natural stands around up here. Apparently hungry cows would gather around to eat the sweet moist wood chips from the farmers axe. I have chewed the sweet inner bark material and enjoyed it, B. rupestris, almost like coconut.

As far as ID between Kurrajong and QLD Bottle tree (B. rupestris) it is quite easy. Bottle trees are quite a bit smaller, have a pronounced beer belly (bottle shaped trunk) and have narrow leaves, quite different to the standard Kurrajong leaf.

I grew up with a story of a bottle tree blowing over in a storm and an old milk cow hollowed the flesh out of it leaving an almost perfect shell (random story ).
is it true that you can eat the flesh of the bottle tree and kurrajong and water can be extracted from them ?
 

Aussie Forager CQ

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I grew up with a story of a bottle tree blowing over in a storm and an old milk cow hollowed the flesh out of it leaving an almost perfect shell (random story ).
is it true that you can eat the flesh of the bottle tree and kurrajong and water can be extracted from them ?
Cool, that is neat. Quite similar to the wood chips too. I have read that water can be extracted from roots and that they can also be tapped into the trunk to extract water/watery substance. Not sure of the details though. I have eaten the flesh before and it is quite sweet. The gum is ok too, just very bland that's all.
 

Hairyman

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Here's what a Queensland narrow leaved bottle tree = Brachychiton rupestris looks like,
 
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Vanja

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Wow! It looks so unusual! Have you tried it already? How is it?
 
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