tutorial on how to make spunks/sulphur matches

Wave Man

Pyromaniac
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
2,115
Reaction score
562
Location
Brisbane, QLD
and I just made up a batch of fatwood spunks, have yet to try them but I am betting they will be the best ones yet, here beside the usual paddle pop spunks

 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
Joined
Mar 9, 2013
Messages
2,148
Reaction score
369
Location
Perth, WA
You’re correct when you say it makes sulphur dioxide when it burns, importantly when this hits water it makes sulphurous acid. So don’t breathe it into your nice moist lungs!
 

Wave Man

Pyromaniac
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
2,115
Reaction score
562
Location
Brisbane, QLD
You’re correct when you say it makes sulphur dioxide when it burns, importantly when this hits water it makes sulphurous acid. So don’t breathe it into your nice moist lungs!
thanks for the confirmation Thrud, yeah it's not nice and I did get a few small whiffs of it while filming this, always do this in a well ventilated area as it is not a pleasant smell and I would say could be harmful, so just be careful with it.
 

Wave Man

Pyromaniac
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
2,115
Reaction score
562
Location
Brisbane, QLD
I been busy and made up a heap of spunks, found a new type of stick as well (the smaller, thin ones in the front of the pic), I think I like these ones better than the paddle pop sticks and made a few fatwood spunks (as mentioned before).
I will spread these out throughout all of my traditional kits.

I want to make up more of these, just have to process more fatwood into sticks. But as far as normal spunks go I won't need any more as I have enough now.

I have also ordered some professionally made spunks (they call them sulphur spill matches) from BeaverBushcraft as a part of a Tinder starter pouch kit to test and compare to my ones.



and all of them in one bag
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 16, 2011
Messages
5,227
Reaction score
284
Location
Melbourne, Victoria
Historically the spunks were sharpened to a point, both to help kindle the flame, and (I suspect as a bonus side-effect), to minimise the amount of sulphur required per match.
Historically, there were sold very cheaply by "beggars", so they would have cut all cost, but still wanted a usable product
 

Wave Man

Pyromaniac
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
2,115
Reaction score
562
Location
Brisbane, QLD
I noticed that with the ones from Beaverbushcraft had a sharpened point at one end and I suppose they would be trying to do them period correct. I do find the ones made from the round sticks work better to catch alight. I also think I am a bit heavy handed when applying the sulphur but I want to make sure I get a good coating on there.
 

Bushdoc

Malcolm Douglas
Joined
Apr 6, 2013
Messages
34
Reaction score
27
Easiest to light were ones I made from toothpicks....very small ember will light them, rather than ones made of 3mm dowel (not easy to light with ember).
Remember to stand up wind.
 

Wave Man

Pyromaniac
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
2,115
Reaction score
562
Location
Brisbane, QLD
the smaller ones are definitely easier to light, but the bigger ones last longer from my experience.
 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
Joined
Mar 9, 2013
Messages
2,148
Reaction score
369
Location
Perth, WA
Can you feather the ends to get more sulphur on them, or would that make them too likely to snap off?
 

Wave Man

Pyromaniac
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
2,115
Reaction score
562
Location
Brisbane, QLD
Can you feather the ends to get more sulphur on them, or would that make them too likely to snap off?
you don't really need all that much sulphur on there, about as much as I have on there in the pics is as much as required as they catch really well and burn fine.
 
Top