Turn around go back

Peter123

Les Stroud
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Ok here is what I'm thinking. Modern man has been trotting around for about 200,000 years. Neanderthals lasted about 360,000 years (give or take). For us to match the Neanderthals we have to last another 160,000 years ( personally I don't think we stand a snowflakes chance in hell of doing that). Which then brings me to the thought that maybe advancing past the stone age was a mistake. Lucky for us we don't have to look 40,000+ years into the past to see how they were living. We just have to look approximately 100 years in the past at the Australian aborigines to find similar level of technology. Which makes me think that maybe these bushcrafting deitys that people want to emulate were actually heading down the wrong path. Obviously I know we can't all go back to the stone age, but there are certain clues to be found in literature about how certain groups of aborigines lived ( concerning tool making and use). Which ultimately is probably a much more sustainable form of bushcraft and skill set than practicing 101 stupid ways of starting a fire, or various other nutty things that we do out bush.
 

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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Peter, you are a gem, full marks & I totally agree. I have however set my time limit at 1680-1740, because I do like a few comforts & of course this period still includes all the primitive indigenous skills of the New World & Australia. I am thankful for modern medicine, but I think the world would be much better off if we had not passed the mid 18th century & had the industrial revolution.
No offence to anyone here, but I think bushcraft today has gone off track. For those that like to pay with modern gadgets & experiment with modern materials, I say enjoy yourselves, but personally I do not class this as "bush crafts". My idea of drawing the line is equipment & skills from the woodsrunner era in the mid 18th century, it was/is a combination of white man early technology & indigenous skills.
Anyway, those are my thoughts, & I would love to see more skills & equipment from pre industrial revolution being used on this forum.
Keith.
 

Bushdoc

Malcolm Douglas
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I remember a book something like "Self sufficiency for the eighties". Based on homesteading in Oz.
They said to choose the level of technology with which you are comfortable.
If you are happy banging rocks to light a fire, good.
If you can actually maintain your own computer, and reliably generate your own electricity then go for it. But can you?
 

Randall

John McDouall Stuart
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Ok here is what I'm thinking. Modern man has been trotting around for about 200,000 years. Neanderthals lasted about 360,000 years (give or take). For us to match the Neanderthals we have to last another 160,000 years ( personally I don't think we stand a snowflakes chance in hell of doing that). Which then brings me to the thought that maybe advancing past the stone age was a mistake. Lucky for us we don't have to look 40,000+ years into the past to see how they were living. We just have to look approximately 100 years in the past at the Australian aborigines to find similar level of technology. Which makes me think that maybe these bushcrafting deitys that people want to emulate were actually heading down the wrong path. Obviously I know we can't all go back to the stone age, but there are certain clues to be found in literature about how certain groups of aborigines lived ( concerning tool making and use). Which ultimately is probably a much more sustainable form of bushcraft and skill set than practicing 101 stupid ways of starting a fire, or various other nutty things that we do out bush.
Yeah, the other thing is there used to be much less people and much more bush, so it really made sense to have bush skills. Now things are turned around; not much bush and a huge amount of people, everywhere. We can't all go out getting sugar bag, or building huts from local bush. The bush is becoming a precious commodity - there simply isn't enough of it to support us if we chose to live that way. One example of how greatly things have changed, for me, is navigation - you're never too far from a road or 4wd track. I resent that. I miss the days of my youth where I wouldn't see signs of people for weeks at a time. For me, the world has become so much smaller than when I was a kid.
 
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Markie D

Les Stroud
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Yeah, the other thing is there used to be much less people and much more bush, so it really made sense to have bush skills. Now things are turned around; not much bush and a huge amount of people, everywhere. We can't all go out getting sugar bag, or building huts from local bush. The bush is becoming a precious commodity - there simply isn't enough of it to support us if we chose to live that way. One example of how greatly things have changed, for me, is navigation - you're never too far from a road or 4wd track. I resent that. I miss the days of my youth where I wouldn't see signs of people for weeks at a time. For me, the world has become so much smaller than when I was a kid.
Yeah I agree, my biggest hate is seeing other people when i'm out in the bush. the forests around my area are definitely not small forests, but yet you are always within 700-800 meters from a road no matter where you go.
 

Kindliing

Les Stroud
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Miriam and Peter Lancewood are a couple who have decided to give away civilisation and chosen wilderness camping life in new Zealand and Miriam has written a book about it .
She also has done some YouTube interviews that give a view into their experiences.
She is the hunter and Peter is the cook.
Both are well educated , she was an athlete and a teacher ,and is a very physically strong woman and Peter has also some diploma education.

Its also worth listening to if your interested (I'm sure for many bushcraft men to imagine a counterpart) , although I have not yet read her book, she is an inspiration and also to women.

The book is called woman in the wilderness.

Her YouTube channels are 2
Miriam lancewood and also -woman in the wilderness.
 
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