Trip Preparations

Wentworth

Bear Mears
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
2,644
Reaction score
83
Location
Blue Mtns
BushcraftOz recommends the following preparations for trips in the bush:

A detailed trip plan left with at least one responsible adult who will notice if you are gone and/ or a detailed trip plan left with the police.
Please remember that if you don't return by the expected time, a friend, family member or work colleague WILL report you missing, even if you don't want them to. If you are reported missing in the bush, a search and rescue party will be out looking at you. Rescuers have DIED trying to save people.

A phone call, or a triggered PLB, or an SOS alert from a SPOT Messenger will most likely result in a rescue flight to you within hours, as happened recently in the Blue Mountains, NSW. This is cheaper for the taxpayer, quicker and safer for the rescue staff than an exhaustive search and rescue mission.
For example, a local newspaper reported that 'more than 1000 people gave more than 10 000 hours over 12 days' in an attempt to find a missing tourist.

The relevant topographic map and a compass and the knowledge of how to use them.
Tracks can be unclear, have intersecting and confusing animal trails, or have various offshoots that don't take you where you want to go. Knowing navigation is one of the most important skills. It is easer to keep track of your location by navigating with a map and compass than to realise you are lost and try to get 'un-lost'.

Adequate food and water
Everyone will react differently to lack of food. An undiagnosed diabetic will not react well. Some people's bodies don't cope well with fasting.
We might be able to 'survive' for three days without water, but after hours, we will be dehydrated, feeling rough and making poor decisions.

Proper equipment and clothing
Hypothermia isn't just for polar explorers. Walking in the rain, or falling in the creek, or travelling in a strong wind without appropriate equipment might be enough over the course of the day.

Experience
Do not be guided by TV presenters or reports of other people's adventures; only ever attempt activities which are within your personal experience and comfort levels.

Laws
Be aware of the laws of the area you are travelling through, whether national parks, state forest or private property.

Sincerely
The Moderator Team
 

TheWander

Les Stroud
Joined
Dec 26, 2013
Messages
58
Reaction score
0
Location
WA
Couldn't of said it better Wentworth the PPPPPPs are the thing that make for an excellent trip.

TheWander
 
Last edited:

TheWander

Les Stroud
Joined
Dec 26, 2013
Messages
58
Reaction score
0
Location
WA
Prior Preparation & Planning Prevents Pi**poor Performance

TheWander
 

pap11y

Richard Proenneke
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Messages
2,239
Reaction score
23
Location
Sydney, Australia
Good stuff Wentworth. A very useful and essential sticky for everyone to be aware of..
 

GTVi

John McDouall Stuart
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
581
Reaction score
0
Location
Adelaide
Excellent preparation list. I would like to add the 3 P's ... Practice, Practice and Practice.
 

Bloffy13

Jon Muir
Joined
Apr 11, 2012
Messages
2,802
Reaction score
119
Location
Albany, Western Australia
@ Darren: Sorry 3Hs and 3Cs? I'm not familiar with those. Please explain (In a nasally, whiny, Queenslandish tone, a la Pauline Hanson)
Cheers
Bloffy
 

trailrider74

Malcolm Douglas
Joined
Apr 25, 2014
Messages
46
Reaction score
1
This reminds me of the "always take" list we used to use in a Bushwalking club. Does BushcraftOz have such a list?
 

DJ*

Lofty Wiseman
Joined
Apr 27, 2015
Messages
159
Reaction score
0
Nice work Wentworth, the amount of people I meet, or hear talk who really don't apply such essential planning, even so called experienced ones. Here is an idea just to add to that....

So you do take it serious, you have your $250 registered PLB, have left intentions and routes with who you need to and in the middle of a wonderful remote region in touch with nature something awful happens to you and you are out for the count. Luckily you are found by a fellow bush walker, sadly they are one of the unprepared type, no phone reception, no map, no clue. They know it's a serious situation that requires help, but without your conscious expertise help is a long way away.

In the very inside top of your pack have a red laminated card with SOS on. Your name, D.O.B, N.O.K, allergies and medications and most importantly. "My EMERGENCY PERSONAL GPS LOCATION BEACON is inside my red pouch. PRESS RED BUTTON in an emergency and assistance will come". Or something similar.

I know of one case where a poor chap died in the bush from a stroke after falling and smashing neck. He had a PLB, did not have time to press it, was found by a family who had no idea he had it. It's likely he would still be alive if the PLB had been found and activated. Just a consideration...DJ
 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
Joined
Mar 9, 2013
Messages
2,058
Reaction score
296
Location
Perth, WA
I think that is a very wise piece of advice. When Doc Uneekwahn and I go for a wander we all know where the snakebite and medic kits are that we each carry as well as were the mobile phones and PLBs are.

I have not written them down for a solo bush bash, but reckon that I might change my practice. I guess the question is, where is the best place to put that info?
 

DJ*

Lofty Wiseman
Joined
Apr 27, 2015
Messages
159
Reaction score
0
We were always told there are two main areas most people look in a panic a) around your neck (army dog tags spring to mind) b) in the main large compartment of your pack. Our cards are about 15cm x 8cm so very noticeable but to big for around neck unless you wanted to look a bit daft maybe. When you open my Bergan there it is tied to the strap, mine actually says PLB inside camouflage pouch and right on top of all my kit in my Bergan are two pouches. One green medics kit with Red Cross on and one camo pouch survival kit with PLB inside. The PLB is in the top of the camo pouch again with a sticker to mark it and make it all noticeable. Snake bite kit also in there, but if whoever finds me needs a medic kit that's obvious too. Have been teaching aid agencies and media this for when overseas too and works well on refresher emergency scenarios so I guess it's tested too. DJ
 
Top