Invertebrate Trigona spp. (Stingless Bee)

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Common Name:Stingless Bee

Scientific Name:Trigona spp or Ausrtoplebia spp.

Other Names:Native Bee

Order:Hymenoptera

Family:Apidae

Distribution:Northern and Eastern Australia

Field Notes:Small black bee to 5mm long.Stingless.Colonial.Nests in tree hollows,logs and cracks in rocks.
Of 1500 species of bees native to Australia most are solitary, 10 species are colonial and produce honey.

Uses:Important polinators of native plants and some commercial crops.
Kept by hobbyists for intrest and educational value.
The honey is prized by Aborignal people (called 'sugarbag') and the wax they produce is used as a glue
(sometimes mixed with plant resins or pitch or charcoal to alter properties) for spears ect.
IMG_0324.jpg
 
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Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Honey prized by Aborignal people (called 'sugarbag') and the resin they produce is used as a glue for spears ect.
By "resin" do you mean wax, or is there some kind of bee resin too ?

Bee's wax can mixed with plant resins/pitch to make a less brittle glue - charcoal and plant fibers have been commonly added too.
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Yes, Aussie123 I meant wax not resin. I dont seem to be able to edit at the moment so Ill update when I can.
Thanks
 

auscraft

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By the look of the sacks on thier legs these thistles have plenty to offer them.
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Severe strorms in SEQld on Saturday night shattered this nest in a massive ironbark.



My son (Maggpie) spotted the nest.

Brood, pollen and honey cells.

The honey was light ,runny and very sweet.
 
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T.C.

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I've got two nests (or one very large one with two entrances) under my front patio, entrances are in two cracks between bricks about four feet apart. Nice to know they found a home in my home.
 

Timmy

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I found a nest in a Fig Tree near the swings on the western edge of Musgrave Park in Brisbane a few weeks ago.
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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I find the nests most often in older ironbark trees, anywhere from a meter to tens of meters from the ground.
I look for what appear to be flies or gnats flying around the same spot on the tree. The right sunlight angle helps.
 
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