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Fungi Trametes versicolor

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
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DO NOT use these photos as a tool for safe identification of edible wild mushrooms—use resources that are designed for that purpose

Botanical Name: Trametes versicolor

Common Name: turkey tail

Other Names: Coriolus versicolor , Polyporus versicolor ,Rainbow Fungus, Rainbow Bracket

Habitat wet forests and rain forestsdead logs, branches and structural timber such as fence posts. It can also parasitise living trees.

Distribution: Australia wide and many other parts of the world

Field Notes: Cap flat, up to 80 x 50 x 5 - 10 millimetres can get bigger. Older specimens, can have zones with green algae growing on them, thus appearing green. Pore surface whitish to light brown.
Colour of brackets is very can be greatly variable. Brackets are thin, leathery, relatively flat, but can be 'wavy'. Minute hairs give the upper surface a velvety appearance, with zones of grey, greenish, bluish, rusty-orange or brown, and often have a white margin. Flesh 1–3 mm thick, leathery texture.

Uses: Cancer research link below, fabric dyeing.

References: http://www.anbg.gov.au/fungi/images-captions/trametes-versicolor-0046.html
http://australianfungi.blogspot.com.au/2010/09/48-trametes-versicolor.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trametes_versicolor
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Bastyr+University+Begins+New+NIH+Research+on+Mushrooms+to+Treat+Cancer-a0126203304
http://somamushrooms.org/dyes/

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auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
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I Don't know .... But I would recommend you read a few links about warnings about bush plants.
http://bushcraftoz.com/forums/showthread.php?7229-Fungi-Disclaimer-and-Warning
http://bushcraftoz.com/forums/showthread.php?32-Wild-Food-Disclosure-Must-Read
Also this statement from Qld Mycological soc.
"Not enough is known about many fungi in Australia to determine their species and whether or not they are poisonous.
The QMS is unable to advise on the edibility of any mushroom.
We strongly recommend that you do NOT eat any mushrooms found in the wild."


"For thousands of years Aboriginal fungal lore and knowledge has been passed orally from generation to generation. The written record began in the 19th century, when various European settlers and explorers recorded Aboriginal uses of and beliefs about fungi. Unfortunately, in most cases there is not enough detail to allow identification of the species involved. It also pays to use early European accounts carefully, for in any cross-cultural contact there is potential for misunderstanding and therefore mis-reporting. It should be no surprise to learn that the early Europeans recorded varied attitudes to fungi amongst the different Aboriginal people of Australia. After all, if you look at the different cultures across the same size area in Europe you'd find the same varied attitudes to fungi." from http://www.anbg.gov.au/fungi/aboriginal.html

Also note some studies are now showing Australian fungi versions being different from their European varieties meaning they may not have same qualities meaning poisonous or not.
 
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