Trail Foods & Camp Cooking. Share your ideas.

Randall

Ray Mears
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My needs are different to yours Keith. I tend to only camp when I'm on an extended walk. Inevitably, because I walk with peak baggers, there will be a couple of long days at least getting back to a tent, or setting up a tent, in the dark. Time and fatigue compete against each other; sometimes it's a choice of eat or sleep, or not a choice with sleep winning. I now don't take a stove and it is a real freedom. No coffee - which I drink a lot of. Food prep is faster and generally healthier. I've always taken fresh vegetables, mostly carrots. I've never used those dehydrated packs - the people I walk with do. A couple even make their own dehydrated meals. I can't believe there is much nutrition in them - well they'd have carbs, fats and protein I suppose. Pack up and setup - everything is quicker and easier. On long trips, over a week, because of the hard physical work we do, I use rice protein. I use it like porridge; mix it up the night before with sultanas, let it sit over night for the morning. That's my protein hit. Then it's cheese, dry biscuits, carrots, peanut butter. I always carry an amount of scroggin for each day. Sometimes the weather never lets up; I can eat scroggin standing up in the lee of a rock. My scroggin is usually peanuts and or cashews and natural sultanas (without the oil). It's hard to sit in the wind and rain and try to make a lunch, which also means opening your pack and exposing it to the weather. A bag of scroggin can be kept in a big coat pocket. If the day is long and late and you're fatigued, it's easy to shovel scroggin in. I always try to take too much scroggin to allow for those really shitty times. American indians used to use pemican and / or jerky under similar circumstances. Magnesium tablets - I always get cramps in the lower legs; magnesium stops this.
 
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koalaboi

Mors Kochanski
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Many years ago I used to embark on long walks. One trip went for 17 days in SW Tassie.

With water available everywhere, carrying "wet foods" was a luxury. Here's a sample menu from those days:

Breakfast:

muesli/porridge
powdered milk
powdered eggs to make scrambled eggs
tea/coffee

Snacks while walking:

scroggin (would add some smarties to the mix too)

Lunch:

Vita weet biscuits
cheese
vegemite
peanut butter
honey
salami
tea/coffee

Dinner:

TVP: mince made up with sachet tomato paste, Italian herbs, garlic, salt and pepper with noodles
TVP: chunky style made up with curry powder, dried coconut milk with rice
One minute Noodles; add bits of cheese and salami for a treat
Desserts: dried fruit(prunes, apricots apples etc) boiled up with a bit of sugar with custard made from dried milk, custard powder and sugar

Would also look for fresh food especially on the coast with plenty of fish, mussels etc
Would take mung beans and place them in a damp sock while walking to sprout.

After dinner: chocolate

Camp cooking:

Used a fire when possible one billy and one frypan (aluminium)
Used an old primus choofer fuel stove if in a hurry or too damp to think of cooking on a fire.
Would also cook in coals.

KB
 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
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Thanks KB, always interesting to read what people use. What is TVP?
 

koalaboi

Mors Kochanski
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Hi Thrud,

TVP is a Sanitarium product: Textured Vegetable Protein. I think it's a soy based product. Used to be around on the supermarket shelves everywhere. I think it's still available having seen it recently. It's cheap, dried, very light. A little goes a pretty long way. Also a bit bland which is why I used lots of spices with it. I'd do a Mexican style thing with it now too. Fortunately, after walking hours with a heavy pack, sitting around a fire at night in the bush one's appetite is ready to find just about anything pretty damn fine!

At 66, my days of long overnight bushwalking trips are mostly behind me as I tend to camp next to my vehicle now. Hoping to purchase a camping fridge soon so fresh will be best for me.

KB
 

Bloffy13

Jon Muir
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I gave this a try a while back. Keen to have another go but over open fires, etc.


Cheers
Bloffy
 

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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To make a Veal Glue, or Cake Soop, to be carried in the Pocket,
TA K E a Leg of Veal, strip it of the Skin and the Fat, then take all the muscular or fleshy Parts from the Bones; boil this Flesh gently in such a Quantity of Water, and so long a Time, till the Liquor will make a strong Jelly when it is cold : This you may try by taking out a small Spoonful now and then, and letting it cool. Here it is to be supposed, that though it will jelly presently in small Quantities, yet all the Juice of the Meat may not be extracted ; however, when you find it very strong, strain the Liquor through a Sieve, and let it settle ; then provide a large Stew pan, with Water, and some China Cups, or glazed earthen Ware ; fill these Cups with Jelly taken clear from the Settling, and set them in a Stew-pan of Water, and let the Water boil gently till the Jelly becomes as thick as Glue; after which, let them Hand to cool, and then turn out the Glue upon a Piece of new Flannel, which will draw out the Moisture; turn them once in fix or eight Hours, and put them upon a fresh Flannel, and so continue to do till they are quite dry, a :d keep it in a dry warm Place : This will harden so much, that it will be … hard as Glue in a little Time, and may be carried in the Pocket without Inconvenience. You are to use this by boiling about a Pint of Water, and pouring it upon a Piece of the Glue or Cake, about the Bigness of a small Walnut, and stirring it with a Spoon till the Cake dissolves, which will make very strong good Broth…..
To make Cake Soop of Beef,
GET a Leg, or what they call, in some Places, a Shin of Beef, prepare it as prescribed above for the Leg of Veal, and use the muscular Parts only, as directed in the foregoing Receipt, doing every Thing as above-mentioned, and you will have a Beef Glue, which, for Sauces, may be "more desirable in a Country House, as Beef is of the strongest Nature of any Flesh : Some prescribe to add to the Flesh of the Leg of Beef, the Flesh of two old Hares, and of old Cocks, to strengthen it the more ; this may be done at Pleasure, but the Stock of all these Cakes, Gravies, or Glues, is the First.
- The Lady’s Companion, 1753.
http://neclhg.freeforums.net/thread/626/veal-glue-cake-carried-pocket
 
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