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Traditional Style Packs

Corin

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Can't help I am afraid, but nice packs you are looking at there already!!!
 

Gundy

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I have a Duluth scout pack for day hikes etc. Quality is EXCELLENT! :) It made me want a larger one now for extended outings.
 

Moondog55

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I guess it isn't very "Bushcrafty" of me but there was a reason bushwalkers; ski tourers and the army stopped using those sort of packs, Pretty to look at but very hard on your back; shoulders, legs and spine.
Good for maybe 12 kilos. I know I used to carry ones just like that.
The quality is good but the design is bad.
Simple packs like that are so easy to make that even I can make them, canvas is very easy to work with
 

Templar

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If you are looking for a good first Leather and canvas pack, may I suggest a Swedish M-39 Military pack... Good quality grey cotton canvas thick leather straps and metal buckles with a quality metal frame, very comfortable and cost very little from most disposal stores... I use one for my "Traditional" kit and never had any problems with it, Just get a pack liner and treat it with some dubbin or Drizabone type treatment, exen snow-seal works well for waterproofing and gives it a nice waxed cotton look too...

http://www.varusteleka.fi/product/r...atulareppu-m39-kaytetty/_2YF0OL60Q&lang=en_US

Some reviews...

http://bushcraftfinland.atfreeforum...hods-f8/my-swedish-military-rucksack-t10.html
 

auscraft

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They look great. Is there some place near you who supplies them so you can try before you buy.
I like the them better than modern type pack
 

Moondog55

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I saw a Swiss "Salt&Pepper" rucksac in Aussie disposals last month and they wanted $220- dollars for it, heck for that amount of money I could buy a new rucksac that works , better, more weather resistant and won't ruin your back.
Sorry guys this is something I don't see the value in, if they were asking $30- I'd say it was fair value.
I think the original "Bergan" was brilliant in its day, had good balance for skiing and held 3 times as much gear as the P-08 rucksac and allowed a soldier a lot more self reliance, but the state of the art has moved a million klicks since 1930

http://www.wildequipment.com.au/backpack_detail.php?Code=WEBO2
I am saving up for one of these, they go on sale every now and again for $299-. I have used the bigger one now for many years, in fact i am on my 3rd WE Alpine pack
 

J.K.M

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Thanks for the input everyone.

@ Gundy - Thanks for your insight. I've heard and read good things about the Duluth from others as well.

@ Templar - Thanks very much for the suggestion! I've checked out the site you linked to and for that price I can't really go wrong. I will seriously consider getting one. I might check with my local surplus store on the weekend and see if they'll order me one in.

@ Auscraft - No, unfortunately not. I have a reasonably large surplus store close by but they generally don't have much in the way of packs.

@ Moondog55 - I agree and disagree. I have had quite a few packs over the years, and the one that has probably seen the most use on long stays in the bush is this one; an 80 litre Mont hiking pack. For carrying heavy loads across long distances, I wouldn't be caught with any of my other packs. I always carry a smaller pack with me though for when I venture away from camp or for day trips. I use them for carrying basic kit and maybe on some occasions my hammock and tarp. In my opinion, the older designs whilst not ideal for heavy loads are still practical for some situations.
 
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J.K.M

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@ Corin - Thanks. Going off looks alone I would probably lean towards the Frost River packs. But having seen Templar's M39 military pack suggestion, and at such a low price - I think I am going to go with that one!
 

Moondog55

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Practical for small loads OK and Yes, but I would still opt for a new pack, I want to know that what I am carrying is strong enough with lots of reserve wear and life left in it.

One of the troubles with buying good quality small packs is that there is very little cost difference between a small pack and a big pack, the labour is about the same and the yardage isn't that much greater, which is why I suggested making your own. The hardest part of pack making is the shoulder harness and suspension and often you can buy those as spare parts
 

ozbladefan

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I saw literally hundreds of these (Swedish ) packs on Monday at a disposals here in Sydney. Ranging in condition from excellent to crap. The look interesting indeed , would I like to carry a fully packed one for a long time , as opposed to a modern one, no. I'll take a modern one. Would I like to have one for light loads and short trips yes.
 

Mountainwalker

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Frost River

I've taken the plunge and gone for a traditional canvas day pack, Frost River CLiff Jackonson's signature pack.

I have 3 modern packs in various sizes that are great, but just felt like something a bit different. I decided to go for a smaller size pack for day trips to compensate for the fact that it has no internal frame or waist strap, i.e. to avoid overloading it.

Now I just need to wait a few weeks.
 

Wentworth

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That looks very nice. I like the look of the trad canvas and leather packs.
 

Mountainwalker

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Yeah, does look nice. Reminds me a little of my grandfathers old fly fishing bag (which is still kicking around, brother uses it nowadays, must be 50 years old).
 

Howling Dingo

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Practical for small loads OK and Yes, but I would still opt for a new pack, I want to know that what I am carrying is strong enough with lots of reserve wear and life left in it.

One of the troubles with buying good quality small packs is that there is very little cost difference between a small pack and a big pack, the labour is about the same and the yardage isn't that much greater, which is why I suggested making your own. The hardest part of pack making is the shoulder harness and suspension and often you can buy those as spare parts

I love to see any packs you have made mate..
 

Moondog55

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Seeing as the last pack I made from scratch was an age ago I have no photos, and truth be told it wasn't very good.
These days I tend to repair and modify what I have to suit my needs

The most difficult part is saving the money to buy the industrial grade sewing machine, not because domestic machines can't sew canvas but because they do not have sufficient lift to get 6 layers of canvas and webbing under the foot, I do miss my old Singer treadle for that reason.
 

Walker

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Hi ,

I am considering purchasing a more traditional style pack - I've found a few interesting looking packs which I've linked to below. I'd be interested to hear if anyone has any first hand experience with any of these or can suggest any others?

North West Woodsman / Frost River

Alder Stream

Duluth Packs

LLBean

Thanks,

Suggest you look at this website for some background:

http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/FAQ_Packs.htm

It really depends on what you intend to do with the pack i.e. day trips, long trips, sight-seeing, etc.

The basics are for bush trips: you need a pack that is not up against your back (either internal or external frame) as it will get hot or a wet back will result in cold weather. Also, frameless packs do not support weight very well - which means the weight is borne by your shoulders and back. A waist (hip) belt is critical in this regard for heavy loads.

This all adds up to comfort and fatigue, and on long trips with heavy packs = injury, which can extend to ankles, knees, hip, back and neck as a result of the body compensating for a badly weighted load.
 

Moondog55

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Yep Rodger is one of the most knowledgeable people I know of, that site has some of the best information I know of, I refer to it often.
We really should get one of the Australian makers to sew up some traditional packs but they need a minimum volume of sales to make it worth while, and we would be lucky to see 10 of that sort sold here, Personally I like my little daypack from WE, it really isn't a mainstream pack any more
 
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