Traditional Flint and Steel kit

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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Have been asked what steel I use for traditional flint and steel lighting. The steel is an American TDC brand sold by a QLD ebay seller viceroybooks (5381). $11.00 and comes with a flint.

In my experience the steel works well with flint and other minerals as well.


A good seller who is prompt with delievery. Also sell spare flints which work well.
 

Randall

Ray Mears
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Have been asked what steel I use for traditional flint and steel lighting. The steel is an American TDC brand sold by a QLD ebay seller viceroybooks (5381). $11.00 and comes with a flint.

In my experience the steel works well with flint and other minerals as well.


A good seller who is prompt with delievery. Also sell spare flints which work well.
Thanks Chigger. I was just looking and came across the same sort of thing and wondered if it is what you had. I've never seen this style before. That is impressive that you get a fire going with that! A true bit of apocalyptic survival gear that will last forever, unlike a ferro rod, but very skill dependent I imagine.
 

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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Thanks Chigger. I was just looking and came across the same sort of thing and wondered if it is what you had. I've never seen this style before. That is impressive that you get a fire going with that! A true bit of apocalyptic survival gear that will last forever, unlike a ferro rod, but very skill dependent I imagine.
Takes a while to get things together, the sort of tinder used plays a major role in reliable firelighting. I was fortunate to stumble across that rotted She oak log which is bonza stuff when charred.

Have found some other rotted wood which works well.

As for long lasting, the steel has seen a bit of use and wear is minimal. Will outlast me I think.

Enjoy your firelighting, its a good skill to have.
 

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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Thanks for the video Keith, your flint throws of a good spark. A lot of sound advice for those wishing to take up tradional firelighting.

As I remarked a few mins ago, the quality of tinder seems to be the key. On more than one occassion spent much time clacking away with the flint, sparks every where but no ignition.

Once things fall together and everything is set up flint and steel can quick and reliable.

Pays to experiment with other minerals which can work quite well and save wear on your good flints.
 

sassyinpink

Russell Coight
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here for the flint and steel kit sharing. thanks. been reading up on camping and starting fire :p
 

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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Here is a fire I lit a few weeks ago with tinderbox and steel. For a flint used a granite stone (shown lying on the steel) which was found in the cave I was camping in.

A few strikes with the granite and had glowing tinder. The rod is my home made bamboo blow tube which works well.

Granite Flint RESIZED.JPG

An important part of firelighting with flint and steel is the tinder. Poor tinder will not catch the spark from the flint and really makes firelighting slow and frustrating.

Look for rotted logs like this she oak log found on a riverside. If there are small black beetles in the wood its a good sign the punkwood will be good as tinder when charred a bit.

Punkwood and beetle RESIZED.JPG

My tinderbox replenished with this soft punkwood and charred.

ReplenisedTinderbox RESIZED.JPG
 
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Chigger

Les Hiddins
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Thought you would recognise the possibles pouch which is does the job very well. Always on my belt when out bushwalking or camping.
 
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