Tools Of The Trade Update.

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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What are the leather things attached to the trigger guards? I’m guessing they protect the striker?
This is a leather hammer cap which is an 18th century safety device. The hammer cap is placed over the hammer/steel to stop the gun flint in the cock from striking the hammer/steel & firing the gun. There is a half cock safety on a flintlock, but the hammer cap is an extra precaution.
Thank you for your interest Thrud.
Regards, Keith.
 

MongooseDownUnder

Richard Proenneke
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This is a leather hammer cap which is an 18th century safety device. The hammer cap is placed over the hammer/steel to stop the gun flint in the cock from striking the hammer/steel & firing the gun. There is a half cock safety on a flintlock, but the hammer cap is an extra precaution.
Thank you for your interest Thrud.
Regards, Keith.
Is that to ensure you “don’t go off half cocked”?
 

Randall

John McDouall Stuart
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Hello Kieth... Just how powerful are those old black powder guns, to say to a contemporary .22 or .222 or .303, say? (in percentage terms).
I've seen a black powder revolver at a club; much louder than modern propellants and a big cloud of smoke :D It was like that scene from robo cop at the indoor range; when the first shot went off, everyone else stopped shooting to see what was making all the noise.
 

Kindlling

Malcolm Douglas
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What kind of timber is used for the axe handle there Keith?
Is it one you made yourself?
 

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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Hello Kieth... Just how powerful are those old black powder guns, to say to a contemporary .22 or .222 or .303, say? (in percentage terms).
I can tell you that the .32 muzzle-loading rifle is more powerful than a .22RF. The ammo is less expensive, & it can digest round ball or conicals.
As for the other calibers, I used to hunt buffalo for meat with a .50 caliber muzzle-loading rifle. The .62 caliber fusil I am using now will handle any any game in Australia.
26159
.32 caliber flintlock rifle with double set triggers.
26160
.62 caliber flintlock fusil with a 42 inch barrel

Keith.
 

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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I've seen a black powder revolver at a club; much louder than modern propellants and a big cloud of smoke :D It was like that scene from robo cop at the indoor range; when the first shot went off, everyone else stopped shooting to see what was making all the noise.
When I belonged to a pistol club in the Territory Randall, it was this one different sounding shot & the smell of black powder smoke drifting across the firing line that got me hooked on black powder:)
Keith.
 

Howling Dingo

Richard Proenneke
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At this present time it is illegal to shoot this pistol off pistol club range. But as a living historian, I like to carry it when doing 18th century camping:)
Keith.
So It is just for show mainly....
 

Le Loup

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So It is just for show mainly....
No, the reason we carry 18th century equipment is because (a) it enhances the experience, & (b) we actually need to experience what life was like back then. We can't tell what it is like to use a particular back pack unless we use it over a period of time in different situations. What may suit one person may not suit another. By carrying a pistol I have learnt how to best carry it, which side to carry it on, whether or not I can still use my hunting knife effectively now it is on the opposite side to what it used to be. How do I carry the different wads? Can I use the same ammunition as I use in the fusil despite the difference in caliber? Does it add much more weight? How does it carry? Can it be used speedily if needed? Do I need to attach a belt hook?
Keith.
 

Randall

John McDouall Stuart
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An ignorant question here Keith, are the barrels rifled? And the pistol?
 

Le Loup

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An ignorant question here Keith, are the barrels rifled? And the pistol?
No Randall, they are both smoothbore. I prefer smoothbore, it is more versatile & easier to load.
Keith.

Advantages of a Flintlock Muzzle-loader.
  • Ammo is less expensive than a modern equivalent caliber firearm.
  • The smoothbore is very versatile, being able to digest round ball, bird shot, & buckshot, or any combination of two of these (can also use minies/conical slugs).
  • The fusil is lighter to carry than a modern equivalent sized gun.
  • You can vary the load if needs be.
  • The smoothbore will digest other projectiles besides lead.
  • Lead can be retrieved from downed game & remoulded with a simple mould & lead ladle. This means that you can carry less lead, & more of the lighter gunpowder.
  • You can make your own gunpowder.
  • You can use the lock to make fire without using gunpowder.
  • You can use gunpowder for gunpowder tinder fire lighting if needs be.
  • IF the lock should malfunction (these are very robust & it is not likely) you can easily repair it if you are carrying a few spare springs & a few simple tools.
  • If you do not have any spare parts & the lock malfunctions, you can easily convert it to a tinderlock or matchlock & continue using it.
  • You do not need a reloader, brass shells, caps, or primers. The latter have been known to break down in damp conditions or if they are stored for too long.
  • Wadding for ball or shot is available from natural plant materials or homemade leather or rawhide.
  • Less chance of being affected by future ammunition control legislation.
  • Gunpowder is easily obtainable providing you have a muzzle-loader registered in your name regardless of caliber (NSW).
  • A .32 caliber flintlock rifle is more powerful than a .22 rimfire, less expensive to feed, more accurate over a greater distance, able to take small & medium sized game, & other than not being able to use shot (unless it is smoothbore), it has all the attributes of the other flintlocks. For larger game you can load with conical slugs, which of course you can make yourself in the field.
  • Damage from a .62 caliber or .70 caliber pistol or long arm is in the extreme. Wounded prey is unlikely to escape.
  • By using buck & ball you are unlikely to miss your target. This load is capable of taking out more than one target.
  • There is less kick-back to a muzzle-loading gun.
  • Antique Flintlock muzzle-loading guns do not require a license, registration, or a permit to purchase in NSW Australia.
 

Randall

John McDouall Stuart
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Yes, awesome. And to the above list you can add (as I'm sure you know), that these firearms can be made and maintained in a post oil world, which will essentially send us back to pre industrial age living. In some old american stories I've read they used all sorts of material for wadding - cotton cloth etc. Silk was a rare and well liked favorite too, it was supposed to give extra range.
 

Edward

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At this present time it is illegal to shoot this pistol off pistol club range. But as a living historian, I like to carry it when doing 18th century camping:)
Keith.

I had no idea they were that powerful. Wow! But I guessed the principle of the cannon still has not changed in nearly 200 years.

Does the ball bearing run out of the barrel if the gun is pointed toward the ground?

So you are allowed to carry it when camping but not shoot it. Does this require some sort of special historical exemption or something?

Beautiful tools...

When I lived in the Territory I had an X-Yugoslav Army Mauser 48A, 7.92mm. It was an incredibly powerful gun!
 

Edward

Mors Kochanski
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What kind of timber is used for the axe handle there Keith?
Is it one you made yourself?

Can't speak for Keithy of course, but I've noticed a lot of quality Australian made tools you buy in the shops use the hardwood 'spotted gum'. One of the best tool handle woods is American Hickory, IMHO of course! ;)
 
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