This is Australia Water is the number number 1 priority

Moondog55

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So why is there plenty of starts on fire and none on water?
Maybe it is because we are so used to having it on tap despite the longest, hardest drought since 1860.
Water! Don't leave home without it.
Attack bleeding to save your life if you have to but keep in mind that in summer you can die of thirst just as easily.

So how much water do you carry as a matter of course and what is your storage capacity??

Winter or summer I always have 2 liters with me and at least 4 liters of storage. in summer I carry extra storage up to 12 liters, sounds like a lot doesn't it/ but this is OZ the land of chateau cardboard and the collapsible wine cask. 2 or 3 empty wine casks can sit in my bumbag or rucksac for years and never be needed.

Ever thought about what you use for drinking and why? I have always carried my green plastic army WB, stupid isn't it; heavy only carries 850ml and is an inconvenient shape, trouble is I always use my canteen cup as well so ir needs to be filed with something.
I have a stainless steel WB that holds a liter, I carry that sometimes when I know I will need a hot water bottle at the end of the day but for the last 20 years I have had better mileage from wine casks and old PET drink bottles.
What do you all carry and use for water??

Lets talk about sourcing water and making it safe to drink in another post shall we??
 

Templar

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2lt on my belt, 3lt in my camelbak, 12lt in my rucksack... minimum... for a trek.

2lt on my belt, 3lt camelbak for a scout.

(Defence teaches you some lessons you never forget...)
 

Corin

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2lt on my belt, 3lt in my camelbak, 12lt in my rucksack... minimum... for a trek.

2lt on my belt, 3lt camelbak for a scout.

(Defence teaches you some lessons you never forget...)
No offence mate... but 17kg and you haven't even got a bag to put it in yet? My whole pack weighs 15kg wet, I carry 6 liters when full 2 x 1 liter stainless bottles and a 4l bladder. As my walking is almost always off track, and often exploratory. Normally 3-5 Days. I have what I would consider to be excessive gear.

as requested I will leave sourcing and treating to another thread, however I got to ask Where on earth do you go treking?
 

Templar

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... however I got to ask Where on earth do you go treking?
Far North Queensland, North West Queensland and Northern Territory... all Arid flat and waterless country... and thats just a 7 day trek without support. As for kit, my basic kit comes in at about 15kg... In my former employment my pack alone would come in at 65kg less water... plus 15kg of webbing, rifle and ammunition... needless to say the term "Light Infantry" is an oxymoron...
 
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Corin

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Far North Queensland, North West Queensland and Northern Territory... all Arid flat and waterless country... and thats just a 7 day trek without support. As for kit, my basic kit comes in at about 15kg... In my former employment my pack alone would come in at 65kg less water... plus 15kg of webbing, rifle and ammunition... needless to say the term "Light Infantry" is an oxymoron...
Holy smokn' catfish, you would be a sh!tload fitter than me!! Totally unnecessary where I normally walk (between Yengo in the north and the snowy in the south.) There is heaps of water if you have half an idea where to look for it. I have never walked up north or out west, but I expect if I did I would have to carry the same as you...
 

Moondog55

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OK fair enough Corin in that part of the world, in the mountains I carry 1 on my belt one or two in my pack and the storage for another 8 liters. BUT
Once when walking in the Flinders I took note of a book called "Walking the Flinders Ranges" ( shame on me I have forgotten the author) and I carried 3 gallons of water along one particular stretch that took 3 days and that was only just enough.
When I lived and worked in the Alice we always tried to keep a 44 gallon drum of water in the back of the ute at all times; you never knew when you were going to need it. For deer hunting in summer in the scrubby country on the foothills of the ranges here in Victoria I carry 2 liters on the belt and at least another two in the pack
Templar you are a wuss, add another 15 kilos for the old #10 set and its stupid battery system at least, and that was B****** Artillery ( RESERVE )
 

Templar

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@Corin: Yes... those were the days... I was quite fit then, but now I'm just a humble English Teacher.

@Moondog55: Dropshort... :p only one set? Try carrying both a HF and VHF plus batts and golf bags... talk about mule work... But I was lucky I was a Scout so I was travelling light. Later JOST duties got me more weight... Then got to dump it all for a Rover and a 9mm so I could just go out and ask lots of questions and make friends with the locals... (ARA)
 

Big Bill

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Horses for courses I think..........I hunt and hike nearly always in the Vic mountains but even here the Geology and Ecology can change dramaticaly.........This weekend I'm taking my kids on a three day hike around the Warbuton area......and will not be taking any water as it very easy walking and only about 10 klicks to each camp with each camp having plenty of water.......If I'm was getting around in areas like Woods Pioint ,Licola etc etc I carry 2 litres of water on my person and select my routes via stable water souces........Weight in these areas is critical as you can be deccending 500,600,700 steep meters or more to access water. Not fun decending off steep ridges when you half dehydrated.......My total capacity is around 7 liters thats how much I've realised that I need for a nights camp and to get me going the next day .........I use the foldable Platypus bottles and a 2 litre MSR hydrolite Bladder for my pack
 

Moondog55

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Just remembered the books author; C.Warren Bonython, I read it way back in the 70s, from memory the author made a habit of using a 20 liter drum for his water carriage utilising an old-style H-frame with a shelf. plus an extra water bottle or two
As Vlad mentions, enough water to get you from one reliable source to the next with a reserve, I would say that I too use about 7 liters a day in mild conditions but that includes hygiene purposes, in hot weather I can use double that.
 

Wentworth

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Assuming I can refill once a day at least, I carry 4L minimum. In hotter weather I need at least a L per hour of walking. It's heavy, but kind of important, so I save as much weight as I can with my other gear! I use two 2.5L platypus bladders which fit flat in the big side pockets of my pack. Easily accessible and don't take up the room in the main compartment.
 

Mountainwalker

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umm, varies a bit depending on what I'm doing, generally 4 liters, have had up to 8, combined with my other gear I found the pack to be pretty heavy. On an outback motorcycle trip I had about 10 liters.

In nepal I did a 21 day unsupported walk with a mate, there was heaps of water but mostly polluted or glacial and full of fine particles. So lots of prep each day to process enough water for our needs..but that's another story for a different thread.
 

Steve

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This is a great thread, pretty daunting task carrying water among other items to maintain survival in harsh conditions. Out of interest i found this method of transporting a 90 litre drum of water in south africa. Interesting stuff but probably not the best method if really mobile, would be good for established camps with ready available water sources though.

http://www.rexresearch.com/hippo/hippo.htm
 

Moondog55

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I went for a walk in a familiar area yesterday (Brisbane Ranges Monday 15 August 2011) and while we have had reasonable rain in the last year none of the small creeks have water in them and the waterholes are still half mud. I had forgotten that one of the side effects of regeneration after a fire is to restrict run-off as the trees put so much energy into making new growth. Luckily I had 2 liters with me, it was raining and I swear I could see the trees growing, but the water was just soaking straight in.
I could have strung the poncho up and collected run-off tho if I had a need, it would have been safer and better tasting than the mud in the water holes dug for the fire crews
 

J.K.M

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It's interesting to see how much water members need to carry in other parts of Australia. Water has never been difficult to locate in the areas that I generally frequent in Tasmania, and the most I can recall carrying for any distance was probably around 3L. I do generally take some piece of kit for carrying larger quantities back to camp though.
 

auscraft

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Moondog very good topic.

In regards to water I personally see it more vital than carrying a shelter or spare clothing ect. But with that said carrying water is as an individual choice as much as what type of equipment you carry. Like any type of trek , camp whatever you must carry the load you expect to use, that will depend on location , season and length and time of travel.

I have gone as far as during 1 summer trek i did for only 3 days I carried my webbing and a Alice frame with gear. The webbing had two canteens and on the frame was 20lt container of water and a bed roll with hootchie rolled in. All other equipment food or needs were carried on my body or webbing. also i have written a simular type thread in show and tell in the review section of the forum.

I believe in the motto be prepared. and my experiences both in military and civilian life tells me water is vital and better to carry than depending on finding it. but that needs to be assessed on each trek and were , when and how you are trekking.
 
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Bartnmax

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Excellent topic.

I believe that how much water you need to carry depends on a number of different factors (as usual).
I do a LOT of deer hunting in the Vic High Country & I only ever carry my Mil WB with me, mainly for convenience & because the WB kit contains my cup (which I would most definitely never go without.
There's definitely no lack of water up there, even during summer, so procuring it aint hard at all.
Preping it for drinking is another story altogether but procuring it to start with aint hard.

On the other hand I used to do a lot of pig hunting in outback NSW/QLD, mainly using dirt bikes & I always carried an 8ltr Camelback with me + an extra litre in my pack. Used it plenty of times but never really had to rely on it as a sole source of water.
For those that say "on a bike you should have been carrying more" I'd also remind you that moving water loads can easilly see you come off the bike & that's not real advisable miles from nowhere, so there needs to be a check kept on how much you carry on a bike, for safety's sake.
I also raced enduro bikes for a while & also used the camelback heaps for that.

One thing that needs to be kept in mind is balancing how much you carry against how easilly water can be procured.
Remember that in dry/arid conditions where water is more of a priority, carrying that heavier weight can also exacerebate fluid loss, so carrying too much water can become self defeating. Under those circumstances it may be far more prudent to procure water from the environment.

My Grandmother grew up in outback QLD (west of Winton) & always argued against 44 gal drums carried in utes, etc.
One hole & you could loose the lot.
Far better to have several containers so that if one is damaged & the water lost then there is still ample available.
Also, a smaller containers are far easier to refill from a local source.
If you do happen to hole your 44 & loose the water, & then fix it, it's damned hard to refill it from a local source & if you could fully refil it you would have no chance of getting it back in the ute by yourself.

Bill A.
 

Moondog55

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When I was living in The Alice we always used 200liter drums for water ( and fuel ) and while I appreciate the argument we never had a hole in a steel drum. you just need to be careful with how they are roped down, that said if I was going again I would use smaller 40 / 90 liter drums because as you say they can be man-handled with comparative ease
 

Bartnmax

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Yeah the 44 would be great for a 'back o the ute' bath tho ;-)

Bill A
 

cattune

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Yeah in australia water is paramount,I live/work in a semi arid area bordering the outback and have often considered the inadequacy of a military style water bottle in such conditions.
As the summer temps here are often in excess of 40 deg C,I rekon my std water bottle would be empty by smoko time!
I often find i will consume 8-10 ltres of water per day when working in these conditions,although i will admit i probably use more water than most.
just looking at the country in this area would indicate a very tough time of survival indeed!
large plastic bags for transpiration trapping seem like a good idea,but you need a lot of them and suitable vegetation to gain much useable moisture -ok i guess if laying up during daylight hrs tending water bags and travelling at night would seem to work,but this is hard country even for the original inhabitants to survive in.....
 
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