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Survival. I think it is time to talk about Climate Change!

Randall

Richard Proenneke
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Well Keith, in answer to your question, which is a good one. I have watched a fair bit of the preppers series, and decided that I don't want prepping to become my life. I have other interests - in short I want to enjoy my life as much as I reasonably can; so that is my focus. We work on a 2 week basis - potentially 2 weeks without power, or water, or food or any one of those.

Since leaving home, I've always conserved water. This is still a very basic process; our washing machine empties into a sink. I plug that sink and we use that water for flushing the toilet. In a previous house we had a shower over the bath; we plugged the bath and used that water to flush the toilet. In an earlier house in a warmer climate (Gippsland) I was able to disconnect the bath from underneath and make a connection for 3/4" garden hose - I used the bath water to water the trees in my garden. Right now we also collect the cold water that initially comes out of the shower head in a bucket - this also gets used in the toilet. I also have a garden hose connected to the overflow of our hot water service. This keeps a birdbath full (wallabies and birds use this) and regularly fills a 20lt water bottle that gets used in the toilet through colder months or used to water plants through the warmer months. It actually pushes out a lot more water through the warmer months. I water trees / plants via a 4 litre icrecream container with a small hole in the bottom - put the container at the base of the tree and fill it up.

We keep 40 litres of water for emergency use. We have the potential to store more if we get any warning. This gets used and replaced every now and then so we know it's good.
We have led torches with rechargable batteries - both head lights and hand held. These are all over the place, including edc kits that I always have with me.
I have always kept a stock of food and consumables; easily enough for two weeks. This and water conservation are habits borne from living in remote locations where water and supplies weren't easily available. We have lots of bottled tomato sauces, dried tomatoes, dried fruits, oats, rice protein, rice, uht milk, noodles, baked beans, processed cheddar cheese; just lots of stuff that doesn't need refridgerating. We try to keep at least a 2 week stock of most things except for perishables (meat and fresh vegetables).
Camp stoves. Some run on fuel, one is a hobo stove that is very economical with small amounts of wood.
Lots of warm survival type clothing. Because of where we live. This is mostly bushwalking gear but also means we can stay warm and not depend on heating.
A vegetable garden. Right now we have lots of rocket and lemon verbena. That isn't all the time of course, but we try to keep something going.
Skills and general preparedness. Both of these are actually a by product of our lifestyles. We both maintain some fitness and flexibility for mtb, bush walking, general health and mental well being. Hopefully we're preventing some medical issues. I like to think I can walk 30km at the drop of a hat; I usually dress in gear that I can do that in, even when I look smart / casual. I always have my daypack with me; even when it is mostly empty it still has my phone, edc kit, compass, pen, pad etc.
We both use bicycles and walking for transport. We still drive cars but we're quite comfortable with walking and riding to work, shopping etc.
Again to do with lifestyle, but I also see it as a prepping thing; generator and large lithium battery, 35litre fridge. If there is no power we can keep a small fridge going, charge phones, torch batteries, listen to radio, use laptop or whatever. The battery is a 2000wh. The generator can charge it in 3hrs and also run / charge other things at the same time. The generator is also a 2000 watt output, but will generally be running around half of that easily (not working hard).
Lots of tools and know how. I can do a lot of my own repairs and some manufacture. Axes, saws, general tools etc.
Lots of spare parts for car, van and bicycles. These include oils and filters for maintenance. The bicycle spares have really come in handy during the covid pandemic - bicycles and bicycle parts have been in short supply world wide. Consider tyres, brake pads, drive train - all those consumables or things that can be damaged.
Good walking boots, hats, gloves, coats etc.
10 liter jerry can of fuel - that will last for ages in the generator. We have two jerry cans - one I use in the mower, when it's empty I fill it up and put it aside, then start using the other one. They are probably kept for 6 months or more before being used. Mower doesn't use much. Fuel still seems good.
Two kilometers of toilet paper :D. It's actually just two industrial rolls, 4,000 feet each. Not big at all. This is due to the asian induced toilet roll panic. Every time there is a little covid panic I still see people going crazy on toilet paper here. We just keep it in a cupboard - it's mostly forgotten about. By keeping a big store of everything, we never panic buy, we just shop normally.

Again, not looking to go indefinitely; aiming at 2 weeks or so of living without water or power or supplies. Some things will last longer of course but everything should be a minimum of two weeks.
 
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old4570

Ray Mears
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TP - 6 months worth ... Very , very , very , conservative estimate ! ( Off stock on hand )
Aldi hasn't had TP for about a month now ..
Might have to go to Costco and pick up a 48 pack ...
 

Randall

Richard Proenneke
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TP - 6 months worth ... Very , very , very , conservative estimate ! ( Off stock on hand )
Aldi hasn't had TP for about a month now ..
Might have to go to Costco and pick up a 48 pack ...
check out those big commercial rolls - office works has them too. They also take up less room for storage. We bought cheap - we were also thinking of family, both sides.
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Well Keith, in answer to your question, which is a good one. I have watched a fair bit of the preppers series, and decided that I don't want prepping to become my life. I have other interests - in short I want to enjoy my life as much as I reasonably can; so that is my focus. We work on a 2 week basis - potentially 2 weeks without power, or water, or food or any one of those.

Since leaving home, I've always conserved water. This is still a very basic process; our washing machine empties into a sink. I plug that sink and we use that water for flushing the toilet. In a previous house we had a shower over the bath; we plugged the bath and used that water to flush the toilet. In an earlier house in a warmer climate (Gippsland) I was able to disconnect the bath from underneath and make a connection for 3/4" garden hose - I used the bath water to water the trees in my garden. Right now we also collect the cold water that initially comes out of the shower head in a bucket - this also gets used in the toilet. I also have a garden hose connected to the overflow of our hot water service. This keeps a birdbath full (wallabies and birds use this) and regularly fills a 20lt water bottle that gets used in the toilet through colder months or used to water plants through the warmer months. It actually pushes out a lot more water through the warmer months. I water trees / plants via a 4 litre icrecream container with a small hole in the bottom - put the container at the base of the tree and fill it up.

We keep 40 litres of water for emergency use. We have the potential to store more if we get any warning. This gets used and replaced every now and then so we know it's good.
We have led torches with rechargable batteries - both head lights and hand held. These are all over the place, including edc kits that I always have with me.
I have always kept a stock of food and consumables; easily enough for two weeks. This and water conservation are habits borne from living in remote locations where water and supplies weren't easily available. We have lots of bottled tomato sauces, dried tomatoes, dried fruits, oats, rice protein, rice, uht milk, noodles, baked beans, processed cheddar cheese; just lots of stuff that doesn't need refridgerating. We try to keep at least a 2 week stock of most things except for perishables (meat and fresh vegetables).
Camp stoves. Some run on fuel, one is a hobo stove that is very economical with small amounts of wood.
Lots of warm survival type clothing. Because of where we live. This is mostly bushwalking gear but also means we can stay warm and not depend on heating.
A vegetable garden. Right now we have lots of rocket and lemon verbena. That isn't all the time of course, but we try to keep something going.
Skills and general preparedness. Both of these are actually a by product of our lifestyles. We both maintain some fitness and flexibility for mtb, bush walking, general health and mental well being. Hopefully we're preventing some medical issues. I like to think I can walk 30km at the drop of a hat; I usually dress in gear that I can do that in, even when I look smart / casual. I always have my daypack with me; even when it is mostly empty it still has my phone, edc kit, compass, pen, pad etc.
We both use bicycles and walking for transport. We still drive cars but we're quite comfortable with walking and riding to work, shopping etc.
Again to do with lifestyle, but I also see it as a prepping thing; generator and large lithium battery, 35litre fridge. If there is no power we can keep a small fridge going, charge phones, torch batteries, listen to radio, use laptop or whatever. The battery is a 2000wh. The generator can charge it in 3hrs and also run / charge other things at the same time. The generator is also a 2000 watt output, but will generally be running around half of that easily (not working hard).
Lots of tools and know how. I can do a lot of my own repairs and some manufacture. Axes, saws, general tools etc.
Lots of spare parts for car, van and bicycles. These include oils and filters for maintenance. The bicycle spares have really come in handy during the covid pandemic - bicycles and bicycle parts have been in short supply world wide. Consider tyres, brake pads, drive train - all those consumables or things that can be damaged.
Good walking boots, hats, gloves, coats etc.
10 liter jerry can of fuel - that will last for ages in the generator. We have two jerry cans - one I use in the mower, when it's empty I fill it up and put it aside, then start using the other one. They are probably kept for 6 months or more before being used. Mower doesn't use much. Fuel still seems good.
Two kilometers of toilet paper :D. It's actually just two industrial rolls, 4,000 feet each. Not big at all. This is due to the asian induced toilet roll panic. Every time there is a little covid panic I still see people going crazy on toilet paper here. We just keep it in a cupboard - it's mostly forgotten about. By keeping a big store of everything, we never panic buy, we just shop normally.

Again, not looking to go indefinitely; aiming at 2 weeks or so of living without water or power or supplies. Some things will last longer of course but everything should be a minimum of two weeks.
Seems to me mate that you have already pretty much prepped :) Well done Randall, & thank you for sharing.
Regards, Keith.
 

old4570

Ray Mears
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TP - The COSTCO stuff is both strong and soft ..
THe Aldi stuff is ok for the dollars ...
A lot of other TP , is really not up to the task of wiping my ass'et
The COSTCO stuff is maybe the best (?) TP I have seen , or used . Just hate going to COSTCO though !
But I might have to . Next time I put fuel in the car , I might have to buy some butt wipes as well .
No rush ( I hope ) .......
 

Randall

Richard Proenneke
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I think all those prepper films are a great insight into what is actually involved to be reasonably serious - it really is a huge commitment. It seems to be their life; how they spend most of their leisure time. If it gels with your lifestyle though, or that's your passion, then it is something you enjoy doing; a win win.

Accepting that the big picture is looking grim, if you're not interested in committing for that sort of scenario, I think it is still a good idea to take some measures. As I said, for me it's two weeks. The good news is, this is kind of like the short term goal of the serious preppers, and it is definitely going to be used when something goes wrong.

We've had a couple of examples here, both storm related. The last few days, many have been without power and / or water (lack of water is an irony) due to huge rainfall. Rivers and creeks are flooding, some roads have been closed etc. These sorts of smaller events are going to continue, of course, along with fire and shortages of anything related to our world wide and domestic supply infrastructure. So for other lazy folk like me, 2 weeks should be achievable and you will see the benefits of it. If nothing else it just means you can go shopping at your leisure because you have a reasonable stock of the essentials. Oh, consider medical things as well.

I've always been passionate about basic edc stuff that is with me all the time. You don't have to consider, grab the kit and go. You can't cover everything (even the most serious preppers can't), but a good way to start is to prepare for the things that are most likely going to happen. For example, in my edc kit I have a small container of sunscreen and some toilet paper, some folding money, aaa battery torch (try not to depend on your phone - you may need all it's power to use as a phone) - stuff like that. Just start. In fact, I'd suggest an edc is the first thing to work on - if things go wrong you may not be able to get home, or it might be flooded, or burnt to the ground. Remember to keep it small so that it isn't much trouble to have on you. I never go leave home without a day pack - it might only have my edc kit, a bottle of water and some other essentials. If it's nearly empty, that's good too - it means I can fill it up with some shopping or something else I've found while out - awesome looking home grown vegetables or fruit that someone is selling out the front of their house.
 
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old4570

Ray Mears
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Hmmmm ...
The more gear you can PACK , the better your chances long term ----- Depending on the nature of the FUBAR !
Again giving pause , for not going anywhere ..
So what should you have on hand ?
Food and water may only last so long ( as well power / gas ) Why I hate the way solar was done ! ( Feeds the grid )
If power goes , current solar does nothing for you .. ( As installed by power companies = A RIP )
Oh well ! I guess if things go FUBAR , the solar can be rewired .

But ...
Do you require meds ?
How long can you live without meds ?
Do your meds require refrigeration ?
Food ... Again depending on the level of FUBAR ...
Would buying seed be worth while ? How good is the soil where you are = what will grow .
What will money be worth ? ( Toilet paper ? ) Barter might be a new catch phrase .. So what do you have to barter ?
Work or services , what can you provide ? ( Marketable skills post FUBAR )
Just some very basic considerations .

One place to look is countries that have gone belly up ...
Rampant inflation , devalued currency , materials - goods shortages !
Covid gave us a small taste of shortages - inflation - and such as factories all over the world shut down or slowed down .
Consider what you can live without and what you can't live without .
Simple things like - glue , band aids , antiseptics ...
Once you get serious about this ........
The list you will end up with will be huge ...
Especially if you are contemplating long term ...
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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I think all those prepper films are a great insight into what is actually involved to be reasonably serious - it really is a huge commitment. It seems to be their life; how they spend most of their leisure time. If it gels with your lifestyle though, or that's your passion, then it is something you enjoy doing; a win win.

Accepting that the big picture is looking grim, if you're not interested in committing for that sort of scenario, I think it is still a good idea to take some measures. As I said, for me it's two weeks. The good news is, this is kind of like the short term goal of the serious preppers, and it is definitely going to be used when something goes wrong.

We've had a couple of examples here, both storm related. The last few days, many have been without power and / or water (lack of water is an irony) due to huge rainfall. Rivers and creeks are flooding, some roads have been closed etc. These sorts of smaller events are going to continue, of course, along with fire and shortages of anything related to our world wide and domestic supply infrastructure. So for other lazy folk like me, 2 weeks should be achievable and you will see the benefits of it. If nothing else it just means you can go shopping at your leisure because you have a reasonable stock of the essentials. Oh, consider medical things as well.

I've always been passionate about basic edc stuff that is with me all the time. You don't have to consider, grab the kit and go. You can't cover everything (even the most serious preppers can't), but a good way to start is to prepare for the things that are most likely going to happen. For example, in my edc kit I have a small container of sunscreen and some toilet paper, some folding money, aaa battery torch (try not to depend on your phone - you may need all it's power to use as a phone) - stuff like that. Just start. In fact, I'd suggest an edc is the first thing to work on - if things go wrong you may not be able to get home, or it might be flooded, or burnt to the ground. Remember to keep it small so that it isn't much trouble to have on you. I never go leave home without a day pack - it might only have my edc kit, a bottle of water and some other essentials. If it's nearly empty, that's good too - it means I can fill it up with some shopping or something else I've found while out - awesome looking home grown vegetables or fruit that someone is selling out the front of their house.
Good post Randall (y)
Keith.
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Hmmmm ...
The more gear you can PACK , the better your chances long term ----- Depending on the nature of the FUBAR !
Again giving pause , for not going anywhere ..
So what should you have on hand ?
Food and water may only last so long ( as well power / gas ) Why I hate the way solar was done ! ( Feeds the grid )
If power goes , current solar does nothing for you .. ( As installed by power companies = A RIP )
Oh well ! I guess if things go FUBAR , the solar can be rewired .

But ...
Do you require meds ?
How long can you live without meds ?
Do your meds require refrigeration ?
Food ... Again depending on the level of FUBAR ...
Would buying seed be worth while ? How good is the soil where you are = what will grow .
What will money be worth ? ( Toilet paper ? ) Barter might be a new catch phrase .. So what do you have to barter ?
Work or services , what can you provide ? ( Marketable skills post FUBAR )
Just some very basic considerations .

One place to look is countries that have gone belly up ...
Rampant inflation , devalued currency , materials - goods shortages !
Covid gave us a small taste of shortages - inflation - and such as factories all over the world shut down or slowed down .
Consider what you can live without and what you can't live without .
Simple things like - glue , band aids , antiseptics ...
Once you get serious about this ........
The list you will end up with will be huge ...
Especially if you are contemplating long term ...
Good post 4570 (y)
Keith.
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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I think there is prepping, & there is prepping. I avoid gadgets like the plague & I do not recommend them. Stick to old methods, older hand tools, flint & steel for fire lighting because it is sustainable. If you are off grid one does accumulate a lot of tools, & they are necessary for living off grid. But I too keep a "go pack" or what some call a "bug-out bag". Mine started life as an 18th century woodsman's knapsack & contents, & it still is, but what is inside this pack will help keep me alive for years, not just weeks. Skills are very important, as important as choosing the right equipment & foods. It does not cost an arm & a leg, it is just basic stuff. Many good tools can be purchases from second hand dealers.
Using your gear & tools is important, you need to be able to live out of your pack without having to think what to do. That is why making fire with flint, steel & tinderbox is so important, you NEED to be good at it & have knowledge of plant & fungi tinders & how to prepare them. Taking the kids camping is a great way to teach skills as no doubt many Bushcrafters know already. Making traps, trapping, hunting, these are good skills to learn, & you do not have to kill wildlife in order to learn how to stalk game. Having the skills & the right tools helps with stress over what is likely to happen, because you know that you are prepared.
Keith.
 

Randall

Richard Proenneke
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I knew you'd be all over it Keith :D . Out of that prepper series, the one dude who I thought was the ultimate also had the least gear. He had knowledge of plants. He could wander around and collect stuff to eat as he went. He was observant, unhurried, and mindful. He reminded me of Aboriginal women of old who would wander around with a dilli bag collecting things to eat. Don't remember the protein side of it. I tried to find a video of him, but couldn't. Did come across this one, it is sort of related but I post it here just because I found it fascinating - re purposing military infrastructure

 

old4570

Ray Mears
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Here in Australia you need to be careful ...
Good stuff looks a lot like the stuff that will make you sick or kill you !
And eating some food stuffs at the wrong time can make you sick or dead !
So unless you really know what's what ....

Also a lot of wild animals are ................ less than healthy ! ( Diseased )
Again , that knowing thing !
In fact , just getting fresh blood on you can be bad , really bad !

It was quite some time ago that a certain Deer hunter used to brag about quartering with a chainsaw ! ( Maybe 30 years ago )
I would not even DARE ! Deer can be diseased and full of parasites !
So you need to protect yourself ...
So for City Slickers ............ So much to learn !
Most people HUNT processed meat in the supermarket ..
Meat that has been feed by humans , given antibiotics , and kept (?) parasite free ( Hopefully ) .
Wild meat , that is a whole new ball game .
So for any City Slickers thinking about survival ... (?) There is so much to know .
I have watched some of the Survival rubbish on youtube , and been on the odd forum .
I don't do that anymore ... For good reason !
If you need a specific skill , research that skill / knowledge and then try and put it into practice .

Just the other day I was looking at Fatwood ! Interesting ...
But my hemp rope , chopped and then given a petroleum jelly impregnation .. Seems to work just as well !
But if I go bush again , I might have a go at finding some Fatwood ( Pine trees = old stump )

Oh yeah , how long has it been since I did the Hemp rope + WD40 ... It's ability to light up easy has diminished with time ..
But that same hemp rope + petroleum jelly is working a treat ! ( Cos I chop rope all the time - for some strange reason )
 

Kindlling

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Something to think about .
All the animals on earth have the right to survive , humans are no different in that way .
This idea that all the animals belong in the forest except humans is nonsense , we are part of nature too .

Believing that lie is stupid .

Right now there is a fight between the Aibika , Pumpkins, Sweet potato, Taro, Cherry tomatoes , Potatoes, Snake beans , bitter melons , paw paw etc , * you get the picture for the best spot in the sunlight .

If there be rain , explaining these things to city people who imagine without a clue , so they can then buy more prepper stuff to try satisfy their obsessive consumer madness . Like they have been sold.

A bit like that song “ whoa oh oh mexico , I’ve never really been there so I don’t really know.”

People in the depression would call it common sense . No labels needed.

Buy rice buy flour , even then if you think long term .

If you have a staple , you have a meal, what you can add to it is a luxury then ,
Protein of the day .look at pacific islands and Thursday islanders T.i’s etc , more food than you can poke a stick at.
 
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old4570

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There was a thing way back in recent history ..
Victory Gardens ...
People turned front / back yards into vegi patches .
Or got flower pots and grew edible plants that would grow in a pot .
In the USA they did community gardens ....
But for some reason the US FEDS seem to be trying to stop home growers ....
Some places , it's against the law to grow vegies ... The land of the free Hu ?
 

Kindlling

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There was a thing way back in recent history ..
Victory Gardens ...
People turned front / back yards into vegi patches .
Or got flower pots and grew edible plants that would grow in a pot .
In the USA they did community gardens ....
But for some reason the US FEDS seem to be trying to stop home growers ....
Some places , it's against the law to grow vegies ... The land of the free Hu ?
Like the idea of guerilla gardening in the towns too . Just plant paw paw or throw tomato out of a sandwich or whatever into a garden somewhere , hard to say how hard the judge would laugh if you were charged for that .the communal street gardens they have now are great . Should be more avenues of honor lined with avocado and mango, fruit trees btw.

Now we have explained where food actually comes from , the preppers can go Bananas if they like.0BC25CB6-CE38-46BD-8316-01C623AAE7A5.jpegGo forth and multiply ........
Unless they need to bury themselves in concrete bunkers because of radiation of course . In which case I would rather take that hit .

Before they find out its monsanto corn thats fed their fish , beef , corn flakes , and wheat in the muesli bars . Now out of stock.
 

old4570

Ray Mears
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Hehehehehehehehe , yeah ......
Long time ago , when I did field archery ...
There were some naughty people that would seed .... ( Allegedly naughty )
They would go hunting in NSW and on the way back swing past certain areas and drop off iGlets ...
I also knew one person that was trying to make vegies grow wild ... ( He said - she said )
I never witnessed such things , but often people said stuff that might have been filed away as BS at the time . ( Early 80's )
I guess archers could be a wild bunch at times .
 

Kindlling

Les Hiddins
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Hehehehehehehehe , yeah ......
Long time ago , when I did field archery ...
There were some naughty people that would seed .... ( Allegedly naughty )
They would go hunting in NSW and on the way back swing past certain areas and drop off iGlets ...
I also knew one person that was trying to make vegies grow wild ... ( He said - she said )
I never witnessed such things , but often people said stuff that might have been filed away as BS at the time . ( Early 80's )
I guess archers could be a wild bunch at times .
It is difficult to plant directly fresh seeds / seedlings here too , you have to account for the native animals . Especially the supple young shoots .

Even in a vegie patch the bandicoots , native rats , insects , bats , wallabies , pigs and the rest .

With root vegetables at least you can try lay chicken wire or smaller over the top to protect your crop beneath the ground in the bush .

A few realistic bush preparations .

Learn to smoke meat , make jerky.

Learn about leaf lard , in harvested animals . Then learn how to make tallow.

Learn to preserve dry fruit and vegies .

In the north ,

get resilient crops . I even saw them mention Taro on a tv show today mentioning climate change .

You can cut the leaf with a bit of the root left on and replant it after you harvest it , they multiply well , love water btw.

Plant snake beans , they are hardy and produce big filling beans .

Plant passion fruit , you will have something sweet .

Plant Aibika , its a leafy vegie , you can just cut a stick and poke it in the ground and it will grow . You will have something to put in your boil up .

Plant cherry tomatoes then they will keep popping up and are hardy , if you have bread and have tomato you have got lunch / pizza with whatever else .
Grow maize .

Grow herbs , rosemary is good for fish and pork .
Grow tumeric and ginger , it goes under ground and spreads , grow chilli’s also and together you have some of the beginnings for the recipe base of some rice and meat dishes . (Like indian).

Bland is boring .

Blanche pumpkin leaves and eat , eat the flower too raw.

If you have spinach , potato and cherry tomato , cook for breakfast add some bread and you could almost be at a cafe having breakfast . An egg is an added bonus .

If you have sweet potato , potato , taro root plus boiled leaves , some leafy like spinach and aibika , ginger , garlic , etc
You have got soup , add whatever meat , dried or fresh .

This is the best fuel out bush I know . Excellent after a hard day a good boil up .
 
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old4570

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Yeah , the roos / wallabies / rabbits / Mice / rats and even birds ( seed ) ..
Then there are snails and slugs ...

Tried to grow strawberries here ... And all we did was feed the slugs & snails ..
Need many many boxes of snail bait this winter & spring to try and clear them out ..
But if the neighbors do nothing ?
And those birds go after our blue berries ! Every year is a battle against the birds .


2022 will be the great slug fest here ...
We had a slug fest about 10 years ago , cleared out hundreds of snails ..
U wouldn't think there could be so many .

Yeah , if you went bush .. U would definitely need to fence off an area for food ( vegetables ) ..
As well go out at night to clear out the snails and slugs ..
No wonder farmers spray death on their crops !
 

Kindlling

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A few cane toads living in the vegie garden are like pet tyrannosaurus’ for bugs late afternoon when then march out of their hiding places and they can eat .

The garden could serve to lure dinner in also .
A butcher here tells me they sit and watch the rabbits eat sweet potato leaves close by and let them at it .

And also , while I am at it sweet potato leaves are edible for us humans .

Don’t think most people realize how realistically they could become semi sufficient .

If there is a collapse I’d suggest to get yourself enough rice and flour for the first couple years , while you set up and get good at growing your staples at least. It takes time to build up .

I buy the hessian bags full of potatoes knowing I wont eat the whole bag straight off so I can plant whats left .

The dollar to calorie ratio is tremendous at this time in history .
When you read stories of the depression where tree cutters and the like worked hard all day and are rewarded with a bag of flour and sugar etc for their trouble ,
We have got an amazing opportunity .

about the wild game and sanitation , it will be good to have latex gloves while butchering feral pigs . They even recommend a face mask these days.

Remember history 1929 ?
 
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