Sugar glider ringbark

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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These pics (if I've loaded them correctly) are damage about 7 to 9 m from the ground to a good sized blue gum,
caused by sugar gliders. To gain access to the fresh sap a new area of bark is chewed each night.
This tree stands some 150m from other trees and has numerous hollows higher up where he gliders
probably live. They have almost chewed completely around the tree with only about 20cm of bark left.
This has taken about 5 to six years since I first noticed it.
They will need a new home soon.
 

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Corin

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Well observed Hairyman!

On a side note, and because I am a Eucalypt enthusiast and I can't help myself, from the very little I can see looks more like Eucalyptus tereticornis... Forest Red Gum, but I will take your word for it being a blue gum, until I see a nut, and bud.

I have see sugar gliders do this to Eucalyptus trees before, but never one so badly attacked as this.

Thanks for sharing
 

Aussie123

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Yes, very interesting.
I'm (shortly) hoping to visit an area where I've seen the sugar gliders before, so I'll keep a look out for these marks ...
 

Hairyman

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Im no Eucalyptus specialist, I just used the local common name. Your most likely correct.
I checked wikipedia for E. tereticornis and confusingly it had many common names incl blue gum,
mountain gum,red gum,bastard box and even red ironbark????
I suppose thats why we have scientific names.(no confusion at all with them. Lol)
Ill try to find flowers and/or nuts to post up.
This extensive chewing damage is fairly common around these parts

Thanks Corin
 

Corin

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I stand corrected! Yes common names are confusing, many common names are specific to regions.
Cheers mate
 

Aussie123

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Hi Hairyman,

I spotted these red gums, not far from Yarrawonga. Not the same as the patches of bark removed which you show, more linear scaring about 6 – 10m above the ground.
Do you think this could be the work of gliders ?


P1250942 (Medium).JPG P1250941 (Medium).jpg
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Hi Ausie123,
Not sure, if it was they were just tasting.
Odd that the marks are linear, maybe stress cracks or grubs???
I'll look around for some more.
Like Corin's database post on E.punctata, theres whole stories to read on tne bark of trees.

Hairy
 
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