Sugar ants

Ash

Lofty Wiseman
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
101
Reaction score
0
Location
nsw
ant.jpg

I was only young when I first tried eating ants.
The last time I was out hiking in the bush, I dont know why but I thought I'd give it a go again. I turned over a few rocks a found some sugar ants.
I chopped their heads off so they would'nt bite my tounge and just through them back and chewed.
They would have to be one of the best tasting forms of bush tucker I've ever had. To best describe it. I would say they taste very sweet. Sort of like syrup
 

Corin

Jiffy
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 5, 2011
Messages
3,438
Reaction score
195
Location
Picton NSW
I would describe them more like lemon sherbet flavour
 

Ash

Lofty Wiseman
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
101
Reaction score
0
Location
nsw
Yeah, I would say more syrupy. Its hard to put a finger on the exact taste but do you agree that they are well worth giving a go?
 

ozbladefan

Les Stroud
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
95
Reaction score
0
Location
sydney
It seems like ants are pretty good.

[video=youtube;KE9FjE4aNKQ]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KE9FjE4aNKQ[/video]
 

Ash

Lofty Wiseman
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
101
Reaction score
0
Location
nsw
You dont know what your missing if you've never tried them.
 

wallum

Malcolm Douglas
Joined
Jul 20, 2012
Messages
31
Reaction score
0
I too was a wierd child :)
I used to eat ants as a kid, just the average little black ant found in suburbia. I remember them as tasting peppery.
You have inspired me to start sampling different kinds of ants. Maybe they would go well in a stir-fry.
 

Corin

Jiffy
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 5, 2011
Messages
3,438
Reaction score
195
Location
Picton NSW
I too was a wierd child :)
I used to eat ants as a kid, just the average little black ant found in suburbia. I remember them as tasting peppery.
You have inspired me to start sampling different kinds of ants. Maybe they would go well in a stir-fry.
I would think more of a desert.... like wattle seed icecream... sugar ant ice cream... the legs may put people off but they taste really good. Actually one of the best tasting bush foods.
 

Greatbloke

Jack Abasalom
Joined
Jan 6, 2012
Messages
1,984
Reaction score
62
Location
Melbourne. [ Outer South East.]
I've eaten some green arsed ants near Airley beach in the Whitsundays.... tasted like lemon sherbet as Corin described the ones that he had.

I would like to try the honey ants that we've all seen in the odd doco from up North.

wild0007.jpg
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
Archivist
Joined
Sep 13, 2011
Messages
4,032
Reaction score
225
Location
Ironbark, SEQ
The North Queensland green tree ants are pleasant enough when held between fingers and your tounge put on their rear end (sounds gross but isnt).
Like a lime type tats. I was told many times by Palm Island Murries that the crushed larvae and water could be made into a drink for help with the cold, but never
saw this done. They dont sting but can give an unpleasant nip with some formic asid squirted on to help you feel it. This seems always to be under clothes and on
tender skin.
I was shown by one bloke how to take a bath in green ants, he ripped a nest apart plunged his hands in and rubbed the larvae,and very agressive adults all over his
shirtless torso and under arm, it took him a while to remove all the ants but said it was very refreshing.
Also saw a couple of scientists running around with butterfly nets, apparently they were researching a moth that parasitised the ants by tricking them to raise their larvae. In turn the green
ants 'farmed' aphids.

Warning!
Not to be confused with the green-headed ant, you definately wouldnt want to put that on your tounge!
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 16, 2011
Messages
5,120
Reaction score
93
Location
Melbourne, Victoria
I've seen a lady crush an entire green ant nest by "clapping" it with her hands. The nest was then used as an inhalant for a cold.
A very strong smell that really did clear the sinus. Not bad at all !
 

Bezerker Viking

John McDouall Stuart
Joined
Nov 8, 2012
Messages
703
Reaction score
1
I remember when I was a kid picking up a sugar ant to eat and it nipped me on the finger and as it did my natural and very innocent reaction was to squeeze it a bit tighter, the result I have never forgotten.
It's arse was pointing towards my face and it exploded and the crap went straight into my eye and burned like chilli does when it gets into your eye (that's another story) lol
But yeah they are really tasty, yer I still eat them regardless of what happened :D
 

max47

Russell Coight
Joined
Jul 26, 2013
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Honey-ants are plentiful where I live and the wife is always digging them up. It`s our favorite bush tucker aside from wild meat.honeynts.jpgSnapshot_20130605.jpg
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 16, 2011
Messages
5,120
Reaction score
93
Location
Melbourne, Victoria
That's an amazing haul of ants !

How long did it take to dig them up and how deep was the burrow?
 

max47

Russell Coight
Joined
Jul 26, 2013
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Well the wife does all the digging lol, I mostly just eat them and put them into containers as she brings them up from the burrow. It's variable, sometimes you will find them closer to the surface, other times you have to dig quite deep to find them..it can take anywhere from 10-40 mins to find honey-ants depending on lots of different things. the burrow can be anywhere from a foot to several feet deep and wide depending on how deep and which direction the "tunnels and caves" are going. My wife is aboriginal so she knows from her years of experience exactly what to look for, where to start digging, she knows how many little caves full of honey-ants a certain digging area will likely have just by the amount of holes on the surface and presence/lack of eggs and other activity, and whether or not the honey-ants are finished in one particular area and it's time to look for another place to dig.


Usually though, we go to areas where there are honey-ants, so well-wooded stands of mulga or mulga woodland type country, and then look around for the tell-tale honey-ant: it has stripes on it's back and usually the wife will dig the surface a little with the crowbar and decide within a few minutes whether it's worth digging here or to look for another spot. Usually she digs deep enough that she makes a little stool for herself in the ground, it's hard to describe but it gives her more leverage and better angle to start digging further underground and then from that point she starts to find the honey-ants. Some people I know are lazy and either don't find many or don't want to dig properly to get them but it's one of our favorite activities so we usually try to get at least a couple hundred if it's good diggin, sometimes I fill up a small powdered milk tin full and more are still coming. I admit to hogging most of them as I am a honey fiend but we do share them with my wife's kids when we bring back enough.
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
Archivist
Joined
Sep 13, 2011
Messages
4,032
Reaction score
225
Location
Ironbark, SEQ
Very interesting Max. What is the crowbar like? Light? home made? Does she use any other tools?
Im sure if you have any other info/pics about collecting bush tucker etc it will be well received here!!
 

peter.robinson

Rüdiger Nehberg
Joined
Mar 7, 2013
Messages
817
Reaction score
6
Location
Brisbane's West
Thanks for the description.
A few days ago I saw some women showing Ray Mears how to dig for the ants.
Ah, here it is, starting about 18 minutes into this episode of one of his shows:
Ray Mears' World Of Survival S02E06 - The Red Centre
http://youtu.be/Deo9Z9yVBYs
The show gives other local techniques too, a couple of ways of getting water, how to get resin from grass seeds (I think it was grass seeds), it's worth a look.
 

max47

Russell Coight
Joined
Jul 26, 2013
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Very interesting Max. What is the crowbar like? Light? home made? Does she use any other tools?
Im sure if you have any other info/pics about collecting bush tucker etc it will be well received here!!
She uses a modern iron crowbar, but it wasn't too long ago they were using only the wooden tools. She also uses a billy can and shovel. Sometimes a tin cup if the billy isn't around. One time I helped her make a makeshift shovel-diggin tool "wira" from corrugated tin sheetapan as we forgot the shovel that time.
 
Top