Stropping

Randall

John McDouall Stuart
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If I had lots of money, I'd have m390 - it looks a very good steel. That sort of quality looks like it won't be wasted with you, which is as it should be :) D2 and s35vn should suit me fine - just sharp functional knives. Actually, the only knives on my wish list now are the RAT II and Zancudo both in D2.
 
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Wave Man

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I gave up on wish lists a while ago, I found my tastes exceeded the size of my wallet...LoL I now only buy knives (in regards to folders) that fit my EDC prerequisites and fixed blades as the whim takes me. I am lucky enough to be in the position to have all the knives I could ever want or use and am at the stage of acting on impulse now rather than need.

As far as M390 knives go, keep an eye out on the secondary market (for the likes of the WE Practic), you will occasionally find a M390 folder going for $150 which is IMHO a bargain and within reach of most knife aficionados.
 

Wave Man

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another stropping compound that seems to be recommended is Smurf-Poo, as in Bolpol - BLUE Buffing compound bar/Honing paste bar - Smurf Poo - for metal polishing - 110g. A search of Ebay for 'smurf-poo' yields results of several different sizings.(at several different price points) I am yet to try this product but will do so in the future.
 

Randall

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Rather than start a new thread, I thought I'd add to this one. It's a theory I've had, and I've been putting it into practise with good results. I have a knife with a scandi grind. As you know with scandi there is no secondary bevel, the entire primary bevel needs to be honed. It has been recommended not to strop scandi ground knives, because stropping leads to a convex bevel. I have a lansky sharpening kit. I thought I'll use the finest stone I have, which is the sapphire (2000 grit). The beauty of this is that it is like a strop with compound, but I can keep the bevel flat. The lansky hones actually give you something to hold while you're doing it too.

26704
 
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Askew

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Rather than start a new thread, I thought I'd add to this one. It's a theory I've had, and I've been putting it into practise with good results. I have a knife with a scandi grind. As you know with scandi there is no secondary bevel, the entire primary bevel needs to be honed. It has been recommended not to strop scandi ground knives, because stropping leads to a convex bevel. I have a lansky sharpening kit. I thought I'll use the finest stone I have, which is the sapphire (2000 grit). The beauty of this is that it is like a strop with compound, but I can keep the bevel flat. The lansky hones actually give you something to hold while you're doing it too.

View attachment 26704
Hang on, why does stropping lead to a convex bevel? I strop my scandi ground knives and haven't had any issues.
 

Thrud

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I think that is right, I’ve but a micro bevel on a Scandi grind and it made it stronger
 

Randall

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You can do all those things, but the blade will quickly get thick behind the edge; well instantly, and worse (or better, if that's what you want) as time goes on. Thick behind the edge is stronger at the cost of being not so slicey - so it's horses for courses. Reprofiling a scandi is a big job if you want your scandi back - you have a lot more steel to remove. Have a look at the youtube link I supplied in first post - the dude explains it well, although it's a simple concept, but I think you need to have a basic mental image or picture of what's happening at the edge. I wouldn't like to try and reprofile a convexed scandi - I'm not good enough to do that free hand. I have to focus when honing a nice flat scandi, and even then I'm not great at it. I'm just not that good free hand. Others find sharpening scandi's easy.
 
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MongooseDownUnder

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Watched the video, disagree with most of what is said. The zero grind scandi (which you are referring to) is a modern concept and very susceptible to damage. I tried it once and even working with pine the edge was damaged quickly.
Even on woodworking tools such as chisels and plane blades, if you grind a single bevel the edge will quickly damage.
 

Randall

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I would have thought single bevel was the original concept of the design; ease of freehand sharpening. I assumed this is why it is a popular grind for bushcraft use - you can hand sharpen it in the field fairly easily and well. It is a definite design choice though. My scandi is fairly thick stock and has been designed with purpose (the enzo birk, now brisa). I suppose it must all depend on how deep that primary bevel is for a particular knife - or bevel angle to stock thickness. I wouldn't want mine any thicker behind the edge - it's a hard user by design already. It's 3mm flat stock to where the bevel starts, a 7mm bevel that drops to 5mm near the point (for even more strength at the pointy end). I've never added a micro bevel to chisels or plane blades; I rarely sharpen them. All my stuff is good quality, but ancient; probably well over 70yo (all inherited). A 2nd bevel will definitely give the edge more strength - that is the choice. It's all a balance of strength and slicing ability. For the purposes of this post, I was just putting forward another possibility that has been working for me.
 
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Askew

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I disagree with a lot of that video too. He even makes a comment alongside lines if 'if you must strop a scandi, make sure you keep the bevel flat to the strop.' Of course you're going to round the edge if you don't keep the bevel flat, doesn't matter if you're using a stone or a strop. Also the strop he had was made with thick leather which is more likely to compress under the blade, so it's not a flat surface. Strop on a hard surface and this isn't a problem.
 

Wentworth

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Interesting regarding the micro bevels vs zero grind scandi grinds.

It does seem to depend on the inclusive angle formed by the grind. The 4mm thick Woodlore has a thicker 25 degree grind from memory so would be ok with a zero grind (although I think Ray does end up putting on a micro with his car window sharpening finisher).

I've still got a zero grind on my Mora 106, but a micro on my helle and companion.

This write up on micro bevels on moras by Robin Wood is an interesting read

 

Aussie123

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I have a few zero grind scandi and I regularly strop then with a compound (and use a stone when necessary).
Its very easy to do freehand in the field or at home, and I'm happy with the results.
I havent used a jig on them.

Sharpening freehand always "risks" convexing, but it hasn't been a problem for me, and even if it did/does convex a bit, I don't see that as a problem.
 
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