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Stringybark

Chigger

Mors Kochanski
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As mentioned in my last thread collected quite an amount of stringybark which makes excellent tinder. Here it is drying in the sun prior to cutting up into smaller pieces which can be carried about.

Will have a go at striking a spark directly onto the charred portion of the stringybark without a piece of tinder and see if that will ignite. May be a bit difficult with flint and steel as the spark is somewhat cooler than a ferro rod. Still worth a try.

IMG_6101_1.JPG
 

Chigger

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Tried igniting the charred stringybark with flint and steel, despite much striking the sparks just would not ignite. As well even dug out an old ferro rod which I have not used for years and no success with it either. Despite showers of sparks.

Looks like will still have to carry charred punkwood. Which works really well.

EDIT: Identified the stringybark as Red Stringybark which can be found in southern and central tablelands regions.
 
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Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Great testing !

Many natural materials, once charred, actually take on fire retardant properties - they can become less easy to light !!!
This can be easily observed with flash tinders, especially downy seeds like dandelion. Once "flashed", they are difficult to light because the burnt materials form a "caramelised" layer which resists burning

Materials that don't do this make the best tinders .... like punk wood !
 

Chigger

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Great testing !

Many natural materials, once charred, actually take on fire retardant properties - they can become less easy to light !!!
This can be easily observed with flash tinders, especially downy seeds like dandelion. Once "flashed", they are difficult to light because the burnt materials form a "caramelised" layer which resists burning

Materials that don't do this make the best tinders .... like punk wood !

Interesting and well appears to be the case. The "caramelised" layer is probably is natural way of giving further protection to the tree/plant against more severe fire damage.
All of the bushland areas which were heavily burnt in the 2019 fires are regenerating in a spectacular manner which is pleasing to see.
 
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