Bird Streptopelia chinensis (Spotted Turtle-Dove)

Tomuda

Les Hiddins
Joined
Jan 2, 2014
Messages
241
Reaction score
42
Location
Wide Bay Region, Qld.
Scientific Name: Streptopelia chinensis

Common Name: Spotted Turtle-Dove

Order: Columbiformes

Family: Columbidae

Other Names: Spotted Dove, Indian Turtle-Dove, Chinese Turtle-Dove

Distribution: Common throughout Eastern Australia, Southern and South-Western Australia. Native to Asia though introduced into Australia in the mid 1800s - early 1900s.

Habitat: Agricultural and suburban areas; parks, gardens. Found year round.

Field Notes: Total length 30 - 32cm, a slender body and long tail, wings and back are brown in colour streaked with black, a greyish head, pinkish breast and a distinct black patch covered with white speckles on the back and sides of the neck, feet and legs are pink in colour.
The nest is a very flimsy looking shallow platform of sticks.





A nestling a day before leaving the nest for the first time.
 

Tomuda

Les Hiddins
Joined
Jan 2, 2014
Messages
241
Reaction score
42
Location
Wide Bay Region, Qld.
It seems recent studies have found some differences quote from wikipedia
`This species was formerly included in the genus Streptopelia but a 2001 study based on molecular sequence as well as vocalization indicated that this along with Streptopelia senegalensis stood out from the remaining taxa then included in Streptopelia.[6] This led subsequent authors to split them out into a separate genus. Carl Sundevall had erected the genus Stigmatopelia with the type senegalensis while also creating the genus Spilopelia (for chinensis, suratensis and tigrina, then treated as separated species) on the same page of his 1872 book.[7] Some authors used Stigmatopelia arguing that it has priority as it appears first on the page.[8] Schodde and Mason in their zoological catalogue of Australian birds however chose Spilopelia based on 24(b) of the ICZN Code which defers the decision to that of the first reviser.[9]`

So it could be Genus - Spilopelia though none of my Australian bird books stated such.
 
Top