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Bird Southern Boobook (Ninox novaeseelandiae)

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
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Scientific Name: Ninox novaeseelandiae

Common Name: Southern Boobook

Order: Strigiformes

Family: Strigidae

Other Names: Mopoke

Distribution: Throughout mainland Australia and Tasmania, and on some coastal islands.

Habitat: Variety of habitats from dense forest to open desert.

Field Notes: The smallest and most common owl in Australia. Identified by its plumage, dark chocolate-brown above and rufous-brown below, heavily streaked and spotted with white. ill is grey with a darker tip, and the feet are grey or yellow. The facial disc is chocolate brown and the eyes are large and yellowish. Size 25cm - 33cm.

Photo bt Auscraft, 2011 South Burnett

View attachment 2398
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Well done to get a photo, its is very difficult to see these owls, but at night they can easily be heard if they are in the area.

Their call is a very distinctive call: "Booo - boook"
 

Dusty Miller

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Be careful when travelling on little used country roads at night. Owls (barn owls especially, but others as well) can often be seen in the middle of the road. They are easily dazzled and will not get out of the way, consequently many are killed by inattentive drivers. Basically, you have to stop and make noise or go around.
 

Blake

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Wonderfull shots as always Auscraft. I find myself looking forward to your bird entries not only for the chance to learn but also for the top notch photographs!
 

Dusty Miller

Alexander Pearce
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You can use owls to catch small birds in a survival situation. A traditional medieval period technique was to tehter an owl to a cage made of brush, in whcih the user sits. When small birds come down to attack the owl, they can be easily caught by the cage wearer, small horsehair loop coould be used o entangle, but that is now banned tech. Hiding under leaf litter also works, to an extent.

A fascimile of an owl or a dead owl is sufficient to invoke the attack response from small birds, since it is often difficult to tell if an owl is alive by looking at it. No doubt inflatable ultralight tactical survival owls will beomce available for the hardcore market sometime soon.

In Australia a dead or model goanna on a string would also work.
 

J.K.M

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Really nice shots auscraft
 
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