Plant sea weed

karl

Russell Coight
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Hi,

I live on the NSW South Coast and we are having a lot of sea weed. I was curious if sea weed is edible? I did a lot of googling and all I could find were some sites referring to sea weed in the UK and in the US. Some zombie-survive-nature-with-nuclear-reactors-sites suggest all sea weed is edible. Again it refers to British and US kinds. Surely, since we love scaring tourist, there is the odd sea weed that's poisonous? Anyone knows anything about this? Further I read the best way of eating sea weed is to let it dry and make it to a powder. Some of the stuff looks appetising as it is. Also, I read about Iodine in sea weed. Should the intake be limited?

Thanks!
 

n5750547

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Hi,

I live on the NSW South Coast and we are having a lot of sea weed. I was curious if sea weed is edible? I did a lot of googling and all I could find were some sites referring to sea weed in the UK and in the US. Some zombie-survive-nature-with-nuclear-reactors-sites suggest all sea weed is edible. Again it refers to British and US kinds. Surely, since we love scaring tourist, there is the odd sea weed that's poisonous? Anyone knows anything about this? Further I read the best way of eating sea weed is to let it dry and make it to a powder. Some of the stuff looks appetising as it is. Also, I read about Iodine in sea weed. Should the intake be limited?

Thanks!
I think most seaweed in Australia is edible but a lot of it tastes pretty bad. Neptune's Necklace and Kelp are two that I've heard of people eating but I've never tried it as we don't get it up here in QLD.
 

Mozzie

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Hi Karl.....I have a friend thats a vegan and she eats seaweed, ill find out some details for you, like you we are both east coast NSW.

Your south coast?, im up in the Illawarra

Mozz
 

Aussie123

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Most sea weeds in Aus are edible, but some are definitely better than others.

What sorts do you have where you are ?

Neptune's necklace is ok raw but can be pickled
Sea Lettuce is nice fresh
Kelps are "edible", but unless processed you won't be able to get your teeth into them - they are tough !

(Generally they benefit from washing in fresh water first)

For iodine the general advice seems to be: It should not be used by persons with allergy to iodine, persons with active thyroid disease, or pregnant women.
However I think this is in regard to large doses and I'm not sure that a "bit of seaweed" would be a problem, still it would be best to talk to a Dr to be sure.
 

karl

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Thanks guys!


'Most sea weeds in Aus are edible' - are there any toxic sea weeds?
'What sorts do you have where you are ?' - No idea what they are called. There is one that looks like a bracelet, olive colored kind of pearls. One, the tastiest looking, is like Parsley, just about a meter long, shiny green and bright pink bits. Another, not so tasty looking, is brownish, kind of like scrunched up paper.

I will give it a shot and let you know about the taste!

I'm guessing the washing will also take care of the salt concentration?
 

Aussie123

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Here's some examples of Neptune's Necklace:

http://bushcraftoz.com/forums/showthread.php?8224-Hormosira-banksii-(Neptune-s-necklace)&highlight=necklace

http://bushcraftoz.com/forums/showthread.php?8225-Neptune-s-necklace-Seaweed-(Hormosira-banksii)&highlight=necklace


Washing will remove the surface slat only. It will still be salty !

Also look for fresh, growing seaweed, not old, washed up stuff - just like with "normal" fruit and veg, you want to select clean, fresh stuff.

Check there are no sewer outfalls or other contaminants. After rain, storm water runoff can also contaminate an area.
 

BjornJ

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I was watching the canadian tv show "Alone" (the one where 10 guys pick 10 things off a list and then placed in the wilderness. Last one to tap out wins $500,000)
They seem to eat their own shrinking body weight in bull kelp.

Has anyone tried this? Is it palatable ?

thanks
Bjorn
 

Aussie123

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Here's some (general) nutritional info for Kelp. Note the "serving size" is 10g (approx 2 tablespoons), so you can extrapolate that for your own body weight if you like :_risata:

I think it would be quite hard to eat a lot of kelp - but there are many different species and some are known for better palate ability than others:

Kelp.jpg
 

Mozzie

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here is the reply from my friend

All seaweed growing in an healthy environment is edible. It is not necessarily palatable.

I'd suggest not foraging near industrial areas or factories near run off into rivers and oceans. Seaweed growing near dry docks or in silty beds in busy harbours will probably be polluted too.

Sea lettuce is the nicest and safest. It looks like tiny little cos lettuce.

Officially fresh seaweed can't be harvested legally in NSW. Only seaweed that has detached and washed ashore can be harvested.
Reserves and conservation zones are NO harvest areas where nothing at all can be removed.

I use sea lettuce as salad and stir fry greens. If you cook it try to put it in late because it cooks fast.
The purple seaweed which is similar to sea lettuce is also good but avoid the furry bits. The furry part catches fine sand and silt making it a bit crunchy.

an extra note: Collecting Seaweed in NSW
It turns out that you can collect up to 20 kg of seaweed per day (check with your council as some may say less than 20kg depending on various factors) from NSW beaches as long as:

That seaweed is for personal use only
That seaweed is not attached to a rock – ie it’s been washed up, and is in the process of decomposition.
You’re not in a National Park or marine reserve.
Seaweed is an important part of the marine ecosystem, so only take what you need, and don’t go crazy.

Seaweed or macroalgae is PROTECTED.
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries/habitat/protecting-habitats/activities-requiring-a-permit



more reading...
https://www.milkwood.net/2015/01/22/foraging-seaweed-home-garden-use/

Common seaweeds of the Sydney region
http://ojs.library.unsw.edu.au/index.php/wetlands/article/viewFile/157/169


Kelp Lady of Narooma
http://www.seahealthproducts.com.au/kelp_lady.htm


Mozz
 

Cam

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I haven't ever foraged for sea-weed or otherwise confirmed this, and I don't have my references handy, but my mental note on this is that any sea-weed that does not look 'feathery' (e.g. for reference so you know what I mean, a land-plant that would be 'feathery' is Dill) is probably edible. Common sense in not foraging in areas where there may be significant e.g. chemical or biological waste or blue-green algae or red-tide whatever would also be applied. Also, the weed needs to be fresh and preferably still in the water (or damp).

Eating lots of sea-weed when you are not used to it can upset your stomach regardless.

Use this info at your own risk! it is all theory I had tucked away in my memory!

I think to be safe, learn some that are definitely safe and common and stick to those unless you are in a genuine emergency.
 
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karl

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Ok on the weekend I caught some fish, collected different sorts of seaweed, cooked it all over a fire and had lunch on the cliff not far from home. Some of it is really good eating!! I added tomato, garlic and onion and enjoyed it! There is a huge difference in the various types, some taste better than others. One was utterly disgusting. Overall with a bit of skill I'm sure you could make a great meal of it!
 
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