Sandalwood find

Redtail

Rüdiger Nehberg
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We were out in the Cuballing/Dryandra area over the weekend, bushwalking, when we came across this Sandalwood tree.

Group.jpg

One of the regulars gave an impromptu lecture ...
Lecture.jpg

This weeping form is not what I'm used to seeing in Santalum spiculatum. Which makes me wonder, is it that species? The weeping habit is more like a Quandong, which is the same genus. Can anyone ID?
Weeping.jpg

Needless to say, they went down well with a well-earned ale at the end of the trip.
Cracked.jpg
 

Redtail

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Redtail

Rüdiger Nehberg
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The more I read about this, the more I'm convinced it's a quandong. The "brain-like" nut is nothing like the sandalwood's smoother (and often darker) nut.
 

Redtail

Rüdiger Nehberg
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bear foot bowhunter

Les Stroud
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I believe there is also a false sandalwood , there is supos to be something minutly diferant about them but can't remember what it was
 

koalaboi

Mors Kochanski
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Hi,

Out last week in NW NSW near Bourke/Byrock. The good winter rains produced a bumper quandong season but also made meat hard to find as emus, roos and goats were so spread out.

The quandongs came in two colours: the red and cream colour. The cream coloured ones were not quite so acid and seemed to have a thicker flesh around the seed.

The fresh white kernels of the seeds can be crushed into a creamy ointment to treat skin problems like eczema. When dry, the kernel can be eaten.

The false sandalwood is also called budda. It has aromatic oils in the wood and leaves. It has other uses too I believe.

KB
 
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