Ross River virus in Victoria.

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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Having had a bout of Ross River fever picked up when I was in Far North Queensland am now terrified of mosquitoes wherever I go. The only way to describe the fever is living death and now take lots of precautions against mosquito bites.
 

koalaboi

Mors Kochanski
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Bloody mossies,

I've had malaria and Ross River Virus. They don't terrify me because malaria is not in Australia and I can't get Ross River again.

Ross River can be asymptomatic in many people. When the blood tests came back for me as positive to Ross River there was also evidence I'd had glandular fever though I don't recall getting particularly sick...I do remember falling asleep in uni tutorials though!

Ross River was hard for me: really tired, sore joints and walking around like an old man I was in my mid to late 30s at the time. After putting up with it for 3 months I took the July school holidays as an opportunity to just stay in bed and I got completely better.

Repellant, long sleeves and pants with thick sox and shoes are to go.

KB
 

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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Repellant, long sleeves and pants with thick sox and shoes are to go.



No argument there, over Christmas will be camping under the awning on my 4WD and sleeping on a open stretcher. So today bought a large mosquito net which will hang over the stretcher.

Not taking any chances with another bout of R.R fever.
 

Bloffy13

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Wife and boss got it at about same time about two years ago. Both have had relapses and, yeah, both were like old cripples each time. Not something I'd like, having seen both do about three painful months.
We are on the south coast of WA so definitely not a tropical disease.
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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It is a debilitating sickness for sure and I have had a mild relapse or two only occassionally which is why am rather paranoid about further bites.

Think R. River fever and others have spread to pretty well all over Australia now. Seems to be appearing everywhere.
 

koalaboi

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Hi,

Not too sure about relapses as my doctor told me that once you have recovered you cannot get it again. I did a quick search and found this advice:

Most people recover completely from these viruses, although recovery can take a few weeks to a few months. During this time you may find that your symptoms are worse some days and better other days. You may also need some form of treatment, usually medicines, while symptoms are present to help control joint pain and swelling. For some people, symptoms persist or come and go for a year or more, although this is rare. The viruses do not cause any permanent damage to the joints and your joints will recover fully over time. Once you have had the virus, you are protected from the disease for the rest of your life.

Unless you had tests, you probably can't be certain you have had RRV again. Maybe you have had something else which might be worth checking out with your doctor.

KB
 

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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In my experience the relapse/s were happily pretty mild, only lasted a day or so and probably yes could have been due to something else. Can't remember any problems in the past few years so think its gone now.

Thanks for the quote and hope it is correct. Still avoid mozzies like the plague.

The mosquito net I mentioned worked a treat, lying in bed could hear whining mozzies try to get at me but to no avail.
 

Bloffy13

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Not to contradict you KB but both the wife and boss had it nearly two years ago and while the relapses are definitely shorter and of less painful duration, it is still RRF. Most bouts last a few days and are getting rarer thankfully as time goes on. I agree though that you cant catch it twice as far as I know.
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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Thankfully that has been my experience and hope it stays that way.
 

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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Thanks for this, quite technical and was not aware RRF was widespread out of Australia. Good read and would want to be a soldier on the Kokoda Trail in WW2 struck down with RRF. They had plenty of other things to worry about.

Myself had enough trouble coping with RRF when in the comforts of a modern home and avaliability of medical support. Although the local doctor I went to did not have single clue what I was talking about.

He looked up Dr Google like I did.......kid you not. When I was in his surgery that's all he did. The remark from this so called professional was "there's a few of those up there".

Have not seen him since then.

Prevention is better than the cure so take care.
 
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koalaboi

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Hi Chigger,

One of the side effects of big doses of strong anti malarials they had in WWII like quinine sulphate is they make you go deaf. Imagine on the Kokoda with limited vision in dense rainforest, you'd need to be able to hear enemy troops!

KB
 

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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Read somewhere the deafness was a continual ringing in the ears as part of the deafness. Truely those fellows went through a lot of horrible trials and suffering.
 

Bloffy13

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Between malaria, dysentary, RRF, the rain, the mud, lack of food, suitable water, the terrain and general shitty conditions, they really didn't need an enemy. The jungle nearly did it for them...
Cheers
Bloffy
 

koalaboi

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Read somewhere the deafness was a continual ringing in the ears as part of the deafness. Truely those fellows went through a lot of horrible trials and suffering.
It's actually like a roaring sound rather than a ringing high pitched sound. That's my experience anyway.

KB
 
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