Plants and People in Mooro Country — Nyungar

uneekwahn

Les Hiddins
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I'm posting this here in the hopes its the right spot. If not, please feel free to move it.

I was taking a look around the net today at work and came across this VERY useful information that is probably (well, definitely) suited to those in the Perth (and more specifically Joondalup/Wanneroo) area.

A little blurb from the document:

"The people of the Mooro Country possessed an intimate knowledge of the local ecology. Contrary to
popular belief, Aboriginal people did not “wander the continent in search of food in order to survive in a
harsh and desolate land” (Isaacs 2002:43). Rather, they held a meticulous knowledge of their own well-
defined area, their Country. The lessons and discoveries about their Country were passed down from
one generation to the next, largely by oral tradition. The way to use and care for the land was ‘written’
into stories and songs of the Dreaming (Cherikoff 1994:24). Knowledge from the Dreaming taught people
how the spirit beings made foods and medicines from the bush as well as formed the lakes, rivers and
mountains.

Plants were extremely important to Nyungar people. Different plants were used to create weapons, such
as spears and shields, to build shelters, for medicinal purposes, and for food. Probably the most important
of these uses was food. In Mooro Country, the abundance and diversity of plant species ensured that
local Nyungar people utilised a substantial number of plants for a variety of purposes. The flowers, stems,
leaves, bark, gum, resin and roots of many plants were all used. Many Nyungar plant names are utilised in
today’s vernacular, including ‘Jarrah’, ‘Marri’, ‘Tuart’, ‘Wandoo’, ‘Bullich’, ‘Yarri’, ‘Moonah’, ‘Quandong’, and
‘Pingle’. "

The document can be found here: http://www.joondalup.wa.gov.au/Files/Plants and People in Mooro Country.pdf

Quite an interesting read!
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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I'm posting this here in the hopes its the right spot. If not, please feel free to move it.

I was taking a look around the net today at work and came across this VERY useful information that is probably (well, definitely) suited to those in the Perth (and more specifically Joondalup/Wanneroo) area.

A little blurb from the document:

"The people of the Mooro Country possessed an intimate knowledge of the local ecology. Contrary to
popular belief, Aboriginal people did not “wander the continent in search of food in order to survive in a
harsh and desolate land” (Isaacs 2002:43). Rather, they held a meticulous knowledge of their own well-
defined area, their Country. The lessons and discoveries about their Country were passed down from
one generation to the next, largely by oral tradition. The way to use and care for the land was ‘written’
into stories and songs of the Dreaming (Cherikoff 1994:24). Knowledge from the Dreaming taught people
how the spirit beings made foods and medicines from the bush as well as formed the lakes, rivers and
mountains.

Plants were extremely important to Nyungar people. Different plants were used to create weapons, such
as spears and shields, to build shelters, for medicinal purposes, and for food. Probably the most important
of these uses was food. In Mooro Country, the abundance and diversity of plant species ensured that
local Nyungar people utilised a substantial number of plants for a variety of purposes. The flowers, stems,
leaves, bark, gum, resin and roots of many plants were all used. Many Nyungar plant names are utilised in
today’s vernacular, including ‘Jarrah’, ‘Marri’, ‘Tuart’, ‘Wandoo’, ‘Bullich’, ‘Yarri’, ‘Moonah’, ‘Quandong’, and
‘Pingle’. "

The document can be found here: http://www.joondalup.wa.gov.au/Files/Plants and People in Mooro Country.pdf

Quite an interesting read!

Thanks. I'll grab a copy to read later.

Are you quoting Jennifer Isaacs saying aboriginal people “wander the continent in search of food in order to survive in a harsh and desolate land” (Isaacs 2002:43) ?
 

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
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uneekwahn
Great find, there are a few PDF's similar to this one for other areas arond Oz there should be more written to give a better understanding of food and resources used by the indigenous people before settlement. So much information has gone and forgotten and we look at global uses which did differ greatly to the aborigine who had great knowlegde of their local enviroment and resources.
 
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