Plant Pittosporum undulatum (Sweet Pittosporum)

Corin

Jiffy
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Common Name: Sweet Pittosporum

Botanical Name: Pittosporum undulatum

Family: Pittosporaceae

Other Names: Native Daphne, Australian Cheesewood, Victorian Box or Mock Orange

Distribution: Eastern Australia

Field Notes: A tree growing to 15m tall with wavy (undulating) leaf edges. It carries conspicuous orange woody fruits about 1 cm in diameter for several months after flowering in spring or early summer.

Uses: The opened seeds can be boiled up to produce a gum. This gum can be used as a safe herbicde on weed seedlings in fragile areas - by smothering the plants. Can be grown as a windbreak hedge in the mildest areas of the country, resisting maritime exposure. Wood. Used in the manufacture of golf clubs.





 
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Farrobeira

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This is one of the more abundant plants where I live (Azores - Portugal).

To me is one of my favourite timbers to bow-drill.

Can you share more uses of this plant?
 

Askew

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Anyone know if the wood is toxic? Haven't found a definite answer one way or the other. There's lots of it around here, and it's technically a weed. Was thinking of making some spoons out of it, but I'd rather not find out the hard way it's not food safe.
 

Askew

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Thanks Hairyman, hadn't seen the second link. Pity it doesn't mention the exact species of pittosporum that's toxic.
 

Corin

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Has anyone else had success with this plant for friction fire. I tried it but did not do spectacularly.....
 

koalaboi

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There are a number of pittosporum species in Australia.

P undulatum is the common variety found along the coast and in most gardens.

Some species such as Gumby Gumby or Pittosporum Phylliraeoides (aka Pittosporum Angustifolium) have well documented medicinal uses.

See: http://www.gumbygumby.info/

KB
 
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