Pin oak acornes

PackJacket

Russell Coight
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A bit of urban forage and what I think may be 'pin oak' tree acornes.

Has anyone here used / processed these type of acornes before?
What do you do with the final product?

I was planning on making a basic bread/biscuit type thing to test it to start with.

Some quick research leads me to believe that these will be fairly bitter / high tannin content, due to:
- Being fairly small,
- Having large hats in proportion to the acorns body, and
- Being from a tree in the red oak category which only produces every other year

And that to make them edible requires leaching to some degree, with fresh water every night untill it stays clear.

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Acornes on branch with leaves

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Shelled and lightly broken up

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Water after the first night of soaking
 

Randall

RĂ¼diger Nehberg
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sounds like a lot of trouble, similar to cashew nuts and olives. There are these pigs on a greek island somewhere that are famous for their fatness đŸ˜‚ - they mostly eat acorns. You might like to consider that, if this quarantine goes for much longer and people start to get skinny, a bit of long pig might be on the menu đŸ˜‚. I imagine they would be an awesome survival food if you can process them reasonable easily.
 
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Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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I've used them before and they were ok, not too much different to others for taste and tannin (IMO)

However being so small they are more work to process (per kilo), so I don't bother with them if larger species are available

- Depends what you're trying to do with them, but if you grind them to a powder paste you increase the surface area and extract the tannins more quickly.
You can even put them in a blender with water to do the job for you, hot or warm water will also leach the tannin more quickly (a few rinses and strains and they are ready to use)
 

Randall

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They are Iberian pigs, not Greek :oops: Acorns must be high fat content by the look of those pigs. Great survival food.
 

PackJacket

Russell Coight
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Fair enough
There was a better looking oak tree with larger acornes near my office I was keeping an eye on over summer but missed out on those when the lock down started.

Thanks for the blender tip,
Probably gonna just try them once to see what it's like

Hopefully won't get so bad we need to stockpile acornes XD
 

Aussie123

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Definitely worth giving them a go when you get a chance.

You can make flour (usually yo need to leach them to get a good flour), but there is no gluten, so anything you make will be very crumbly.
Mixing up to 30 or 40% acorn flour with regular flour will give a nice blend to make a damper or bread
Gnocci work well.
Recipes which use almond meal also work well (substitute acorn)

Having experimented with flour, I'm not sure its worth the effort for me.

I prefer to make acorn coffee - it makes a nice, caffeine free, hot drink
 
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