Out the back door.

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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I'm very fortunate to live in the bush. Its just outside my back (and front) door.
I can go for a four hour walk or a half hour walk and I always find something interesting.
Here is a pic of a hazard reduction fire in December last year with a pic of the same trees yesterday.
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Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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A small dung beetle has trouble rolling a rabbit pellet because its not uniformly round.
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A small fragment of agate, likely waste from Aboriginal tool manufacture.
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Redtail

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That type of growth is known as "epicormic". It's the tree's way of maximising surface area for photosynthesis so it can recover quickly and start growing after extreme stress, such as fire. Once the normal branches and tips start growing, the epicormic shoots will drop off.
Wildlife loves the juicy new stuff, too. Nature's way of encouraging them back into the devastated landscape.
The wildlife will munch away, poo out whatever they've already eaten - like seeds from another area - and off goes the cycle again.
Ain't life on Earth fascinating?
 

gelandangan

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I think the amount of rainfall these last few months helps a lot in the regrowth too.
 

swampy99

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That type of growth is known as "epicormic". It's the tree's way of maximising surface area for photosynthesis so it can recover quickly and start growing after extreme stress, such as fire. Once the normal branches and tips start growing, the epicormic shoots will drop off.
Wildlife loves the juicy new stuff, too. Nature's way of encouraging them back into the devastated landscape.
The wildlife will munch away, poo out whatever they've already eaten - like seeds from another area - and off goes the cycle again.
Ain't life on Earth fascinating?
Untill you stick humans in the mix and we will destroy and consume then move on which is a shame.
 

Bloffy13

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We used to be an important part of the bush cycle. Aboriginal people would patchwork burn an area which increased growth and improved hunting etc while reducing the deadfall and fire load. I t wasn't until humans STOPPED burning the bush that we had any probs. Always good to see that flush of growth in a burnt area.
@ Redtail: Thanks for the explanation.
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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A sign of rain coming? Ants build high rise.
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A young rednecked wallaby looks anxiously for its mother on the other side of the road behind me.
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Hairyman

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An earwig.
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Fungi fruiting bodies growing out of the side of an old cowpat.
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Dutchman

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Nice pics Hairyman!
Once again the fungi prove themself as perfect photomodels.
The Earwig ( we call it a "oorworm") is a nasty looking fella...
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Native cobblers peg, cobblers tack, Glossocardia bidens. family: Asteraceae an Australian native.
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Yet another bandicoot skull, this one somewhat weathered and the back broken out perhaps by a bird of prey to extract the brains.
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Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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This morning , before the rain began... a greycrowned babbler in alarm mode due to the close proximity of my dog.
knowing the alarm calls of different bird species can alert you to the presence of predators such as cats, dogs, foxes, snakes
goanas and birds of prey.
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A lone magpie goose and several other waterbirds beside a small dam.
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auscraft

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What are the little black story long beaked birds bottom centre of Picture?
 

Hairyman

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Glossy Ibis. They are a little smaller than the more common straw-necked ibis.
 

auscraft

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Thanks Hairyman they just looked so so small against the magpie goose
 

darren

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This is a great thread topic mate, and well worth adopting by others including myself. I was standing in my driveway in the dark last night trying to get phone reception and was surrounded by my family of wallabies and i heard a scratching sound on the gravel and looked down an there was an echidna at my feet oblivious to me. I tought about this thread then and that we dont have to go too far to find nature at its best.
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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This morning was what the Irish call a 'soft' day, that is fine misty rain, not wet enough to keep you inside but enough to make you damp.
As I walked passed my dog laying on the concrete she got up to follow me and revealed this dog rainshadow.
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With a cleansing fire through the bush and lots of rain, wildflowers have been stimulated into bloom.
This one is a Bulbine spp possibly B. alata or B. vagans; family Xanthorrhoeaceae, sub family Asphodelaceae
The bulbous roots of the related B. bulbosa are edible.
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Great stuff hairy, the dog rainshadow magic, keep em comin.
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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I have found two more species of wildflowers within 100m of my house.

Goodenia rotundifolia, Round Leaf Goodenia, Family; Goodeniaceae.
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Not Patersonia sericea, Native Iris, family Iridaceae. edit not P. sericea but Murdannia graminea, Slug Herb. family (CAMPANULACEAE, COMMELINACEAE)
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