Oral health

swampy99

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Another informative film.

[video=youtube;2lvM6bc9wUA]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lvM6bc9wUA&feature=c4-overview&list=UU70-RsRYxhMVX9Rd2s_EbNA[/video]

Enjoy.
 

Thrud

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....your bathroom would be pretty messy!!!

Zinc oxide powder and oil of cloves is also useful on long trips in case you lose a filling.
 

BushChef

Karen Hood
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I just don't see how spraying toothpaste everywhere is any different to dropping a golly straight on the grass.. it's still going to touch something that wildlife/ insects will cross paths with, cannot be avoided unless you hock it straight into a ziplock and take it with you. Traces are being left everywhere. No disrespect intended Swampy, just my opinion. :)
 
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Walker

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For the environmentally concerned, my Dad always found joy in telling us how it was in his day (during the 1920's & 1930's depression) - those who couldn't afford toothpaste (and apparently the early stuff tasted crap and only the well-to-do could afford it) used wood ash or salt. Now salt would be problematic as it can cause ulcers, but theoretically, wood ash would be very good as a mild abrasive to clean teeth. The taste and texture would be difficult to put up with but, compared with the thought of going to a dentist back then, I reckon wood ash would be a preferred choice!

BushChef - I like your choice of words: spraying, golly and hock :_lol:
 

swampy99

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From what I read they state that the atomisation of the paste is so small that it is of no risk to the environment unlike the big gob left on the ground for something to lick.

The whole point was that there is no difference to how you clean your teeth in the field than at home just how you dispose of the paste.

The fact that a lot of the survivalist/bushcrafters are going so paleo that it is silly. Why just because Im in the field would I chew a stick to clean my teeth.

Just my 2c worth.

This film may also be a bit tongue in cheek.
 
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GTVi

John McDouall Stuart
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Good video. I also though it was a bit tongue in cheek, and took it lightly. I don't see myself atomizing the toothpaste.
I use backing soda as a tooth paste substitute and is more eco friendly (its a natural source made from soda ash).
 

Bloffy13

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I've always found that a simple heel hole kicked in the ground near the base of a tree works for me. Cover it up after spitting, with a bit of a splash of water and you wouldn't even know it was there. An animal might dig it up because of the smell but wouldn't get much from it, I think.
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Thanks Swampy, teeth are another overlooked topic.

I think its important to remember that simple, everyday tasks like brushing your teeth should not be neglected when you go into the bush.

Another important aspect is to make sure you are fit and healthy before heading off on any adventure, and that includes teeth and oral hygiene; the last thing you want is to be somewhere where you are “stuck” without recourse to treatment; and that goes for any medical condition. Taking an un-treated condition with you into the bush is not wise.


On brushing, I’d like to give a referral to the Australian Dental Association (no affiliation) :
http://www.ada.org.au/faqs/faqsCategory,category,Teeth_Cleaning.aspx

Their general advice on techniques is :
When brushing your teeth it is best to place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to your teeth, aiming the bristles of your brush toward the gum line. The join between the teeth and the gum is a nice niche for bacteria and plaque to accumulate, so it is important to get to this area.

Once you have the brush at the correct angle, all you need to do is jiggle the brush gently back and forward, only brushing one or two teeth at a time. Don’t be excessively vigorous but also don’t be too mild.

Remember. Your are trying to penetrate the bristles into the gaps between teeth to remove a very soft plaque.

You need to be systematic – brushing all teeth in order, inside and outside – and you really should do it in front of a mirror so you can see what you are doing.
Brushing should stimulate your gums, if they bleed with normal brushing, that could be a symptom of gum disease and you should seek dental advice.

Personally I’m not sure about atomising spray over a large area (esp upwind LOL). Although I don’t need to conceal my activities, I also don’t like seeing toothpaste all over the place.
I’m in favour of a small heel kick and bury, preferably in an already degraded spot, like on a nearby vehicle track (situation depending).

I don’t like using the base of trees, or bushes, simply because those places tend to attract kids; and I don’t like the idea atomised spit spread around my camp area – yep I know you probably wouldn’t spray in your own camp area, but what about the next lot of campers, where will they pitch camp ?
 

DavoAnth

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Bearing in mind that anyone who has spend more than a half day in the bush has contributed more to the environment than just an occasional golly…I have been party to arguments on extended trips that natural body waste products are organic etc but that toothpaste is chemical and therefore should not be used. Trust me, at the end of 2 weeks in the jungle when everything you are wearing is either starting to rot or growing mini mushrooms, and your body is smelling like butt crack…smelling a trip buddies breath after 2 weeks on salt or ash (or bicarbonate of soda - yea he carried that for 2 weeks in lieu of toothpaste…) makes you appreciate the simple things in life like toothpaste. My opinion - just be careful, don't spit near waterways etc, use a small cat hole and cover it up, and your environmental footprint is so marginal it is not an issue.
 

Aussie123

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......
Personally I’m not sure about atomising spray over a large area (esp upwind LOL). Although I don’t need to conceal my activities, I also don’t like seeing toothpaste all over the place.
I’m in favour of a small heel kick and bury, preferably in an already degraded spot, like on a nearby vehicle track (situation depending).
......
Just resurrecting an old thread.

I confess that I've been "testing" the "Swampy Spray" method of toothpaste dispersal when I remember to, and
I can report that I think it works well, when you do it right.

I quite like it, although I'm a bit to inconsistent (read "un-co") to be able to do it effectively every time.... but that's just me

One piece of advice: *** Don't try this at home *** :;):
 

Taplow

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I was shown this by someone from Tassie too - and I'm also not very good at it but persist
 
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