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Net Bag

asemery

Ray Mears
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Nets like this can come in handy at any time so my wife and I have an assortment readily available. This heavy duty one is kept in our car. Lighter twine nets are kept in purses and back packs. You never know. Tony
netbag-1.jpg
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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I've been enjoying seeing your various bags and nets. I like the colour of this one !

It gave me pause to think about some of the traditional Australian Aboriginal bags:
- Weaving bags was women’s work, men did not make bags
- The bags were often (or sometimes) very decorative, formed by dying the "twine" before weaving

Example pic (from internet).
Bag_fibre_djerrk.jpg

So for your traditional bags :
Who made these bags (traditionally), men or women ?
Were any of the traditional nets from your part of the world decorated in this way ?

Thanks.
 

asemery

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My fishing nets are reproductions of ones used by the European settlers in this area. I studied museum examples and read histories of the area. The man who taught me how to make the fyke net made them as a boy in the early 1900's. He and his grandmother would get twine from the general store, make fyke nets and fish bags and return the completed nets to the store in trade for groceries and twine to make more nets. Most of my net bags have a basis on his teachings. Of course I always study any new net that I see and incorporate (steal) any good ideas.
As to who made the nets. The fellow who taught me learned from his grandmother. His family did not embellish the nets and I have not seen any other nets that were not strictly utilitarian.
The Native Americans in Eastern Pennsylvania (Lenape) made nets - interesting video http://lennilenape.weebly.com/how-the-lenni-lenape-fished.html but I have not seen any decorated nets in local museums. Tony
 

Aussie123

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Sounds like a traditional cottage industry, producing commodities for sale.

Presumable the man’s parents would have been engaged in “work” (farming or fishing ?) so the old and young contributed by net making ?

Regarding nets, as far as I know (which isn’t too far), Aboriginal nets were also quite utilitarian (like the Lenape one in the video), but the bags (made by women) could be quite ornate.

Thanks
 
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