my jerky recipy

Wave Man

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finished product after 12 hours of drying, tastes fantastic, some of the best jerky I have made to date.
 

hillbilly

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Looks good waveman. I have 3kg of corned beef with teriyaki in the dehydrator now and another 5 hours to go and i'll be eating some. Yum Yum
I always finish of jerky by just placing jerky in a open tray or wide dish in the fridge for a few days and the aircon drys it out great to a lovely crispy dry piece of culinary jerky.
 
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Wave Man

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beef cuts that are the "best" for jerky are topside (my preferred cut) or the round cut, these are the leanest cuts from the cow. Hillbilly how does the corned silverside come out as jerky? Pictures and a "review" please.
 

hillbilly

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I've used a number of variety's of meat & chicken and keep going back to corned beef for the texture and taste and my mates are keen as for a chew of my jerky, Corned beef is the cheapest meat as well which is a good bonus. I cut about 3mm to 5mm thickness by hand and across the grain. I cut all the the fat and crap off and good to go after 12 to 24 hours of marinade. I have a sunbeam dehydrator 10 tray. Rotate my trays in 1/3 lots every 3 hours and finish up about 9 hours (on 3 setting) or 12 hour hours (on 2 setting) (3 can over heat and shut off until you turn off and turn back on loosing time)then throw in the fridge for a couple of days to really dry out in open trays. I bag it up and throw it in the freezer. Pictures due in a couple of ours.
 
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hillbilly

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Here's the finished product from today's cook up. Tastes great and my little niece is already scoffing it down. I tend to start the heat setting on 2 until it starts to shrink up to give more air flow through the trays. Half way mark go to 3 setting to give it a kick along, today was about 11 hours. Hmmmmmmm Are you hungry yet.
Jerky2.jpgJerky6.jpg
 

TasMonk

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I don't want to be a kill-joy, but in the interest of everyone's health and safety, please be aware that
there is a risk of potentially serious food-borne illness unless jerky initially reaches 71 C (160*F)
I'll admit, this risk is relatively low when using large whole cuts of quality meat, but the risk rises significantly with game meat, amateur-butchered meat, or small cuts/mince. If it occurs, the illness can be severe enough to be fatal, particularly in children, the elderly, and those with either poor digestive processes or compromised immune function.
[Just one good reference: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Factsheets/Jerky_and_Food_Safety/index.asp]
 
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Wave Man

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I heard this today on YouTube as well, and is a good caveat. TasMonk are the risks reduced if you add heaps of salt to the marinade? I also add Stones Green Ginger wine to my jerky marinade (the alcohol would have to add some preventive as well I am thinking). Also how does this go for Biltong, which is air dried, and never really heated to anywhere near 71 degrees C?
 

TasMonk

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The risks pertain primarily to Salmonella and E. coli bacteria that can be present on the meat, generally due to contamination in the killing or butchering of the animal, or at any stage in the meat handling.

According to a major research study[SUP]1[/SUP], "marination alone did not result in significant reduction of the pathogen" so I'd say that salt or alcohol in the marinade wouldn't make enough of a difference for the jerky to be considered entirely safe. Salt can be used to preserve meat safely, but to be effective you'd have to actually "cure" the meat with it, which a normal jerky marination is just not sufficient to do (although if you are interested in getting into the science of curing meats, it is fascinating, fun, and delicious!). As for the inclusion of a bit of alcohol, it certainly doesn't hurt but again the amount used in a marinade just isn't going to be enough to insure the destruction of any pathogens present on the meat.

Biltong, which is very similar to jerky, also poses health risks due to the presence of these same pathogens. However, as biltong is generally partially cured and acidified before drying, the risks are statistically lower than for jerky. Regardless, whether you are drying meat jerky-style or biltong-style, the recommendation is to raise the meat to a temperature high enough to kill the pathogens before drying.

[SUP]1[/SUP] "Effects of Preparation Methods on the Microbiological Safety of Home-Dried Meat Jerky" by Brian A. Nummer et al. (Univ of Georgia), Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 67, No. 10, 2004, Pages 2337-2341.
 

darren

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The risks pertain primarily to Salmonella and E. coli bacteria that can be present on the meat, generally due to contamination in the killing or butchering of the animal, or at any stage in the meat handling.

According to a major research study[SUP]1[/SUP], "marination alone did not result in significant reduction of the pathogen" so I'd say that salt or alcohol in the marinade wouldn't make enough of a difference for the jerky to be considered entirely safe. Salt can be used to preserve meat safely, but to be effective you'd have to actually "cure" the meat with it, which a normal jerky marination is just not sufficient to do (although if you are interested in getting into the science of curing meats, it is fascinating, fun, and delicious!). As for the inclusion of a bit of alcohol, it certainly doesn't hurt but again the amount used in a marinade just isn't going to be enough to insure the destruction of any pathogens present on the meat.

Biltong, which is very similar to jerky, also poses health risks due to the presence of these same pathogens. However, as biltong is generally partially cured and acidified before drying, the risks are statistically lower than for jerky. Regardless, whether you are drying meat jerky-style or biltong-style, the recommendation is to raise the meat to a temperature high enough to kill the pathogens before drying.

[SUP]1[/SUP] "Effects of Preparation Methods on the Microbiological Safety of Home-Dried Meat Jerky" by Brian A. Nummer et al. (Univ of Georgia), Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 67, No. 10, 2004, Pages 2337-2341.
It tastes good though.....
 

wallum

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Now I've been inspired to make some jerky by all your great pics! My only procrastination has been that meat is so expensive.

The best jerky I ever had was made by a guy called Helmut from W.A (years ago), and he made it outside over his fire-place. I'd like to try drying mine out by fire, but my outdoor fire place is tiny. I might just have to build a bigger one :)
 

Aussiepom

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Nice excuse to build a bigger fire place :D. However, I do all my jerky by simply air drying in a 'cage' on the dining table. Rig up a mossie net or a section of some old net curtains to keep the flys off.

Interestingly, I happen to disagree with Waveman's earlier distinction between jerky, (artificially dried), versus biltong, (air dried). Biltong did indeed originate in South Africa and jerky - the word at least, if not the actual method - came from the Native American word 'charqui'. It too was traditionally air dried. The fire was there not for the heat, but simply for the smoke, to keep the flies away.

The 2 methods are simply different ways of preserving meat, but for me, the biggest differentiating factor between the 2 is how they are prepared and served/eaten: Jerky is cut ACROSS the grain, (to make it easier to chew), in mouth size pieces and once it is dried and stored and ready to eat, you simply pick a piece up and put it in your mouth. Biltong is cut ALONG the grain in much bigger pieces and once it is dried and stored there is one more step required before it can be eaten: While the pre-match show is on, you now cut a bigger piece ACROSS the grain into smaller individual pieces, ready to be eaten.

Of course this is just my own observation. It would be interesting to see if there are any South African members on the forum who can tell us what they consider to be jerky rather than biltong.
 

silverback

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Another warning guys,i was always told if there was any mould on the jerky at any time"bin it,all of it" apparently the pathogen causing mould can be deadly.It may be the same ones mentioned in earlier posts.
 

Aussiepom

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Hmmm... I've never heard of that in the context of jerky before, but in regards to Biltong, when I was researching how to make it a few years ago, the advice was always that if there's any mould you can just wipe it off with vinegar and then eat as normal. I've tried it, and I'm still here!

But of course there could be many different variables giving rise to many different types of mould?
 

Moondog55

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Salami goes mouldy on the outside; it is considered part of the maturation process.
I have never come across a commercial jerky I would consider food for full time use, they all are far too salty and too many herbs and far too spice.
If I can find any really lean grass reared NON-FEEDLOT beef this year I may have a go once more but for my own consumption I really prefer pemmican, although I only made it once I was immediately convinced it was an excellent way to store meat for travel.
Trouble with beef like that is you need to be able; usually; to buy the whole carcass which is a lot of meat and we have only a small freezer for the rest of the meat.
 

Wave Man

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Salami goes mouldy on the outside; it is considered part of the maturation process.
I have never come across a commercial jerky I would consider food for full time use, they all are far too salty and too many herbs and far too spice.
If I can find any really lean grass reared NON-FEEDLOT beef this year I may have a go once more but for my own consumption I really prefer pemmican, although I only made it once I was immediately convinced it was an excellent way to store meat for travel.
Trouble with beef like that is you need to be able; usually; to buy the whole carcass which is a lot of meat and we have only a small freezer for the rest of the meat.
that's is a problem Moondog as far as the salt issue goes, I too dislike a lot of salt (I have high blood pressure so salt is a killer for me, besides just about all processed food has more then enough salt in it, without having to add more) but jerky needs salt, part of the drying/preserving process I am afraid.

Meat for drying isn't a problem real either, my local butcher sells top side roasts for around $10-$12 for a reasonable sized roast, this is perfect for a batch of jerky, and cheap as well. I would be surprised if you couldn't get a similar deal from your local butcher. Topside roasts are lean with very little fat and about perfect for jerking. Either that if you can harvest a deer use it.
 

Moondog55

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There is a real difference in the nutritional value of different meats, if I can't get real beef I'd use roo topside; I can get that at Safeway.

Meat is very expensive here in Victoria, 10- a kilo for topside roast
 

Wave Man

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roo topside would be perfect mate, roo is lean like deer. Sounds like you need to move to QLD...LoL
 
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