my dedicated fire kit pouch

Edward

Mors Kochanski
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I've grown up using dubbin. I can recommend olive oil. I've been using it on my high end walking boots (very thick leather). The leather seems to maintain condition all year - even after being soaked through and dried again. And, it doesn't seem to stretch leather like dubbin does (with boots and belts). Dubbin washes out in leather that is soaked then dried. I use olive oil on anything leather now.

Hi Randall. Thanks for the tip. I will give it a go. Its got to be a lot more economical than Dubbin that's for sure.
 

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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Hi Randall. Thanks for the tip. I will give it a go. Its got to be a lot more economical than Dubbin that's for sure.
I use neetsfoot oil, but it must be pure neetsfoot, NOT compound! Good stuff for leather & guns.
Keith.
 

Chigger

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This is not a fire pouch, rather an old leather workmans case which I came across many years ago. Was stored and neglected for a long time with some slight cracking at the fold of the lid.
Rubbed in Neatsfoot oil quite a few times until the leather went darkish. More or less the original colour it once was.

Have to be careful with Neatsfoot oil as to many applications will soften the leather to the point where it just splits apart.

The case is used to transport my camping stove and a few plastic bags of tinder/small kindling along with my possibles bag.

Everything is kept together.

LeatherCaseRESIZED.jpg
 

Le Loup

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This is not a fire pouch, rather an old leather workmans case which I came across many years ago. Was stored and neglected for a long time with some slight cracking at the fold of the lid.
Rubbed in Neatsfoot oil quite a few times until the leather went darkish. More or less the original colour it once was.

Have to be careful with Neatsfoot oil as to many applications will soften the leather to the point where it just splits apart.

The case is used to transport my camping stove and a few plastic bags of tinder/small kindling along with my possibles bag.

Everything is kept together.

View attachment 25934
Interesting, I have literally bathed leather in neetsfoot oil & have never had any problems. Perhaps this only happens with very old uncared for leather?
Keith.
 

Chigger

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The comment came from a horse riding forum where restoring of old antique bridles, saddles and other horse gear was being discussed. Put applications of Neatsfoot oil over a couple of weeks until when the leather became darker which would have been its original colour I think.

Was more careful with the fold on the lid as there was already some slight splitting of the leather taking place due to age. So took it easy with applying Neatsfoot, just enough to soften the leather a bit.

Had our local bootmaker sew some of the straps up a bit as the stitching was frayed.

Well worth it as the case is quite handy as mentioned.
 

Randall

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Yes, Post Master General - pre telecom, telstra. They used to give out lots of great stuff. I have 2 shelham australian made, nail nick opening, liner lock sheepsfoot pocket knives too; still as new :) Really well made. Apparently they were used for cutting steel strapping that is used to hold boxes together and hold stuff on pallets. An absolute waste of a beautiful knife. Incidentally, from memory (because I'm too lazy to look), those cases; the edges where the joins are were cut at 45 degrees I think. The stitching went through the corner through both pieces.
 

Edward

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Yes, Post Master General - pre telecom, telstra. They used to give out lots of great stuff. I have 2 shelham australian made, nail nick opening, liner lock sheepsfoot pocket knives too; still as new :) Really well made. Apparently they were used for cutting steel strapping that is used to hold boxes together and hold stuff on pallets. An absolute waste of a beautiful knife. Incidentally, from memory (because I'm too lazy to look), those cases; the edges where the joins are were cut at 45 degrees I think. The stitching went through the corner through both pieces.

Nice. Yes I have seen those, but wasn't lucky enough to hang onto one! Definitely a waste of a good knife! I once considered purchasing one of the old US postal messenger bags- I didn't give a thought too how well bags were made until I studied one! Vegetable tanned full-grain leather & they had a copper rivetted support frame. Nothing like vintage official Government issue gear.
I miss the old PMG phone boxes for some reason:piange:
 
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MongooseDownUnder

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Do you have photos of the knives, I used to have a Telecom knife that my father gave me when I was young. It was a lovely sheepsfoot blade with a rounded rosewood handle.


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Chigger

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Guessing official Post Master General's cases? Or ermm... possibly Poor Man's Gin cases? In which case I wouldn't remember the latter, no :_lol:

The case I have is ex Forestry NSW and were issued to their field staff. Inside at the ends are masonite boards as stiffners. Very well made and now nearly always is taken out on my car based camping trips.
 

Randall

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Do you have photos of the knives, I used to have a Telecom knife that my father gave me when I was young. It was a lovely sheepsfoot blade with a rounded rosewood handle.
I've been wanting to take photos of them for review for ages. I'm lazy. But here they are. It's years since I've looked at them, and a couple of things I remembered wrong. They are made in Japan - Shelham's were originally made in Australia. And, my father has obviously sharpened them at some point. I inherited them, oiled the pivots and the blades, then put them away. It looks like telecom insignia - pre telstra. Because the front and backs of the knives are nicely rounded, I've had to use clothes pegs to hold the knives where I wanted them. If you click on the first picture, it'll enlarge a bit, and you can cycle through them.

shelham closed.jpgshelham end.jpgshelham liner locks.jpgshelham LS.jpgshelham rs.jpg
 
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Chigger

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Nice looking functional knives and something for the collection.
 

MongooseDownUnder

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Yep that’s exactly like the knife I used to have! Great knife have been looking for a replacement for years after mine was stolen when I was a cadet. I’m sure onewill pop up on eBay or gumtree eventually.


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Randall

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I remember them. Neat looking examples too:_applauso:
Yeah, I don't think they've been used much. Dad always carried a knife. He worked on old (vintage) cars. I'd regularly see him cleaning off a gasket surface with his knife though :_lol: He was different when I was very young; we used to shoot rabbits and catch fish. He always had something like a joseph rogers bunny knife or an old timer stockman's knife - I think in those days they were strictly knives treated with more respect, and not general tools. His needs changed.
 

Randall

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Yep that’s exactly like the knife I used to have! Great knife have been looking for a replacement for years after mine was stolen when I was a cadet. I’m sure onewill pop up on eBay or gumtree eventually.
I'll post this here, just in case someone else is interested. I think I've found someone who sells these knives new. I've just asked them online whether their knives have a liner lock like mine do. They've just answered and the knives have a linerlock. The knife. I will also say, after taking those photos, I thought the scales needed some attention. I gave them a coat of olive oil - it has transformed the wooden scales. Highly recommend this if you have old knives with wooden scales.
 
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Thrud

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Thanks WM, very thorough kit, did not see the size of magnifying glass, but looked like it might be a tad small...
I ordered what I thought was 5 fresnel magnifiers(credit card size) off eBay, but wound up with a few more than that by mistake...if you’d like a couple pm me.
 

Wave Man

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thanks for the offer mate, it is much appreciated but I have like 30 fresnel lens (credit card sized ones), I bought a heap of them a while back and add them to most of my kits.

The small magnifying glass in that kit is about the same size as a $2 coin, quite small but it does work (I have tried it on char cloth and it embers up in a bout half a second on a bright day) I have thought of buying a larger one (I have one that is about 50mm in diameter on ebay) but have just not seen the need.
 
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