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Monocular

Randall

Rüdiger Nehberg
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I have carried a monocular for decades. My original was one half of a cheap set of 10x25 binoculars which I could no longer focus. This was really good and fast to focus. I used that for 20 years or so, then lost it. My current one is a nikon 5 x 15mm. This is amazing. It is as small as they get and so useful - I always have it. It is even good for close bird watching - wrens and insects as close as .5 m. It isn't nitrogen filled and does not have the full suite of nikon coatings.

In the bush I often use it to confirm what something is. Urban is the same, even reading signs at a distance.

Anyway, it seems that nikon have stopped making that - you might be able to find it somewhere. Right now though, I'd probably get the vortex solo 8x25 - this really seems better made for outdoor use too, although bigger and heavier. I wouldn't go higher magnification than 8x; it's really more than enough. Most sales etc seem to push the 10x range in all monocular / binoculars - I'd go smaller. It's seems to be a newby's mistake, higher magnification are harder to hold steady. You can test this by trying to read a sign that is at the edge of legibility; higher magnification magnifies the effect of any movement. Higher magnification are also bigger / heavier and have a smaller field of view for the same diameter glass.

The vortex are nitrogen filled (won't fog), waterproof, rubber armored, fully multi coated, and what I'd consider good price for what you're getting. Shopping around they are from au $98 to about $150.

 
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Chigger

Mors Kochanski
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Those monoculars can be handy things. I have a cheap Tasco 8x21 always in the 4WD and has been handy at times to identify distant featurers and such.
 

Randall

Rüdiger Nehberg
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I have the Vortex 8x36 R/T and it is fantastic, I highly recommend it.
They would be awesome - so much light and much bigger field of view. I'm kind of suggesting the virtues of smaller size - I always have mine because they are so small. They actually fit in my fist. The 8 x 25 is about the next best regards size, quality, and price; other than size they are probably better than what I have.

If I knew I was always going to use the monocular every outing, I'd probably go the 36 too.
 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
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I tried MDUs one at the Boyup Brook meet. Then went and got one, took it all round Canada. The only thing I don't like about it is the Molle pouch it comes with; too tight a fit.
 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
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Yup, but you wouldn’t want it. Too difficult to take the monocular out of, pushes the cap off putting it in. Put in in a pocket on my chest rig.
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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A poor man's monocular can be made with an old rifle scope.
Tape a short plastic or even cardboard tube on the eyepiece end to give the correct eye relief, being
careful to leave the focus ring free to be adjusted.
 

Randall

Rüdiger Nehberg
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A poor man's monocular can be made with an old rifle scope.
Tape a short plastic or even cardboard tube on the eyepiece end to give the correct eye relief, being
careful to leave the focus ring free to be adjusted.
For sure! My first monocular used to be one half of a binocular - it was awesome. The bino's went out of sync (or my eyes did). I just hold the monocular off my head with my curled index finger and thumb against my head. I hold the monocular at a good eye relief. Holding the monocular against your head also makes it very steady / solid. I turn my head and monocular as one solid unit. Rifle scopes can take a bit of getting used to; because of the long tube are hard to see out of until you align them with your eye sight. Exit pupil is another issue - I didn't get into that because 8x25mm or 5x15mm is still good for us older folk (around 3mm exit pupil). Younger folk would appreciate the 8 x 36 in low light conditions.
 
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