Mesh tents vs Bivvys

Edward

Mors Kochanski
Joined
May 22, 2018
Messages
398
Reaction score
275
Location
Outback, South Australia
Hope you are all doing well... Sorry if this topic has been done to death, but I would like to hear from people who have considerable experience using the following, or other sleep systems please in a variety of elemental conditions - idea's on a sleep system for summer, but that could possibly be pushed into Australian winters also?

Please be specific as far as keeping bugs out, weight and bear in mind the possibility of storm surge, blowing rain, heat and condensation. This topic comes after I noticed my One Tigress Tent Backwoods Bungalow 2.0 was leaking - so NOT recommended if you are considering guys.

Believe me I enjoy sleeping the old fashioned way and under the stars, but where I live its crawling with huge wolf spiders and there are brown snakes, not to mention dingo's. As its summer now I'm really enjoying using mesh tents and tarps. I've used swags, but I haven't used a bivvy, but I hear they condensate, are hot in Australia and I don't like things on my face when I sleep, but they are better in storms apparently.

Special thanks to a good member put me onto the Australian Army TAS bivvy from Tentworld. Its tempting, but its not cheap and I don't want to buy something I cant use as its too hot.

I like the fact that you can get a bathtub floor with a mesh tent, the room and safety aspects, but a quality bivvy can handle storm surge too.
As far as weight goes, I believe a bivvy and tarp; or mesh tent and tarp come out about the same these days, in fact I've noticed a bivvy and tarp can be slightly heavier than a mesh tent and tarp.

I thought about sewing a bathtub floor on the base of my Australian Army mosquito Hootchie, the mesh is just fantastic and it even creates a micro-climate in winter.



Cheers,
Edward


My Australian Army AUSCAM Tarp and mesh tent I self camouflaged today






798g (Tarp 750g) total = 1598g)





Australian Army AUSCAM Tarp and Australian Army mosquito net (hootchie). Great, although I tuck it under my sleeping pad and it keeps coming out!
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
Joined
Apr 29, 2011
Messages
839
Reaction score
353
Location
New England NSW
Hope you are all doing well... Sorry if this topic has been done to death, but I would like to hear from people who have considerable experience using the following, or other sleep systems please in a variety of elemental conditions - idea's on a sleep system for summer, but that could possibly be pushed into Australian winters also?

Please be specific as far as keeping bugs out, weight and bear in mind the possibility of storm surge, blowing rain, heat and condensation. This topic comes after I noticed my One Tigress Tent Backwoods Bungalow 2.0 was leaking - so NOT recommended if you are considering guys.

Believe me I enjoy sleeping the old fashioned way and under the stars, but where I live its crawling with huge wolf spiders and there are brown snakes, not to mention dingo's. As its summer now I'm really enjoying using mesh tents and tarps. I've used swags, but I haven't used a bivvy, but I hear they condensate, are hot in Australia and I don't like things on my face when I sleep, but they are better in storms apparently.

Special thanks to a good member put me onto the Australian Army TAS bivvy from Tentworld. Its tempting, but its not cheap and I don't want to buy something I cant use as its too hot.

I like the fact that you can get a bathtub floor with a mesh tent, the room and safety aspects, but a quality bivvy can handle storm surge too.
As far as weight goes, I believe a bivvy and tarp; or mesh tent and tarp come out about the same these days, in fact I've noticed a bivvy and tarp can be slightly heavier than a mesh tent and tarp.

I thought about sewing a bathtub floor on the base of my Australian Army mosquito Hootchie, the mesh is just fantastic and it even creates a micro-climate in winter.



Cheers,
Edward


My Australian Army AUSCAM Tarp and mesh tent I self camouflaged today






798g (Tarp 750g) total = 1598g)





Australian Army AUSCAM Tarp and Australian Army mosquito net (hootchie). Great, although I tuck it under my sleeping pad and it keeps coming out!
In the Territory I used to just sleep on the ground with a blanket over me in the dry season, wet season I used a tarp. Here in the New England area I still just use a blanket, summer & winter, & I have an oil cloth for a shelter. Camping skills & experience are also very useful in keeping yourself comfortable & dry in bad weather.
Making Camp 1.JPG
003.JPG
Snow Walk for trek video 17-7-2015 003.JPG2.JPG LARGE3.JPG
Regards, Keith.
 

MongooseDownUnder

Richard Proenneke
Joined
Jul 8, 2013
Messages
1,809
Reaction score
310
Location
Perth, Western Australia
I have used a Bivy bag quite a bit and they can be good.

I found however they can get quite hot and humid inside, they usually have something to tie the head end up off your face.

However I think a net tent may be better, I am personally looking at a few options myself. I think the net tent would cover all seasons quite well depending on design.

Terra Rosa Gear has a great one that has reach end covered in sil nylon instead of mesh so wind blown rain from the ends of your tarp would not be a problem.

There are also for comparison a few bivys around that are more like a net tent, but offer protection from wind blown rain.
 

MongooseDownUnder

Richard Proenneke
Joined
Jul 8, 2013
Messages
1,809
Reaction score
310
Location
Perth, Western Australia
Just thinking more, is your primary concern also keeping the weight down for carrying it? If so you can buy tents they weigh a lot less than your current setup for the price of a good bivy.

If you want to go really lightweight you could get a Sea to Summit Nano Mosquito net which weighs 82 grams and has a cord around the base to sinch around a mattress or groundsheet.
 
Last edited:

Edward

Mors Kochanski
Joined
May 22, 2018
Messages
398
Reaction score
275
Location
Outback, South Australia
Just thinking more, is your primary concern also keeping the weight down for carrying it? If so you can buy tents they weigh a lot less than your current setup for the price of a good bivy.

If you want to go really lightweight you could get a Sea to Summit Nano Mosquito net which weighs 82 grams and has a cord around the base to sinch around a mattress or groundsheet.

In the Territory I used to just sleep on the ground with a blanket over me in the dry season, wet season I used a tarp. Here in the New England area I still just use a blanket, summer & winter, & I have an oil cloth for a shelter. Camping skills & experience are also very useful in keeping yourself comfortable & dry in bad weather.
View attachment 28156
View attachment 28157
View attachment 28158
Regards, Keith.

Hi Keith,

Hope all is well on that glorious Homestead in New England.

Seems I need to toughen up somewhat. That can be done.

They are some gorgeous pictures you took there.....definitely what its all about. I've seen that video, and I look forward to watching it again! Thankyou...

Like HowlingDingo and yourself, vintage kit is definitely one of my interests, and I have been collecting, in the minimalist sense. I will post some of it soon for interests sake.

Ah... so we're both former Northern Territory men. I spent some years up there and thoroughly enjoyed it! Genuine people. Learnt a lot about life. While most Southerners hid On Campus, being the adventurer I am, I got out and met the locals and embarked on many remote adventures. Formed many lifelong friendships and learned a lot about life. Who knows... I may return one day. They say that happens, as you probably have heard.

I mentioned a while back I was waiting for summer to make an oil cloth tarp. My plan is to mix red ochre clay that is in the red soil up here, with raw linseed oil and pure gum turps. I believe I need a white king size Egyptian cotton sheet, if I can find one. I will post when its done.

P.S. If I haven't mentioned it already, have you seen the Polish military Lavvu tent? Its made from beautiful green canvas. It comes in 2-3 sizes and has a port for a stove. I think you would appreciate it. Here is a video showing the tent and a relaxing Bushcraft experience (no voice over). This is the medium size and this man is 6"1" tall. I have enjoyed the serenity of his videos very much.



Cheers,
Edward.
 
Last edited:

Edward

Mors Kochanski
Joined
May 22, 2018
Messages
398
Reaction score
275
Location
Outback, South Australia
Just thinking more, is your primary concern also keeping the weight down for carrying it? If so you can buy tents they weigh a lot less than your current setup for the price of a good bivy.

If you want to go really lightweight you could get a Sea to Summit Nano Mosquito net which weighs 82 grams and has a cord around the base to sinch around a mattress or groundsheet.

Hi Goose,

Thanks for the options, the experience and for seeking clarification. It means a lot.

In answer to you're questions, here are my ideas and priorities. Sure I can buy a really good tent and I wanted too. I considered many quality tents for a few years; Big Agnes, Hilleberg Akto, Tarp Tent, Lite-Fighter 1 and the Russian SPLAV, but there were 4 pre-requisites I needed they didn't meet. 1.) They can be hot in Australia and I'm looking for something universal if possible to use in winter and summer, with the option of full mesh for heat and star gazing. 2.) I'm looking for camouflage or strict earth tones, thanks for the options, though- - while Keith is 18th century and you are U.L., I enjoy stealth camping, prepper training and using military surplus, as its tough; and 3.) I want to keep the weight at or under 1700grams.

Note, I am not inexperienced at camping out in all temperatures, but I am inexperienced in camping out in storms, which is something I would like to do more of. A dream of mine has been to camp out in an extreme storm. Hence the swing toward military surplus where possible, or quality Kit - I like to be ready for anything, hence my prepper interests.

Here's another pic of what I brought on Ebay and camouflaged myself. The size is really good 1.5 persons if you know what I mean. But as mentioned, it needed work! As mentioned, I more brought it as I couldn't find anything else of better quality that was suitable! It was only about $50 delivered! I also had the idea of those flapped ends either side of the tent, that would sure help. I saw one tent with these but is was really expensive!

Experience is the best teacher. Two things I've found about the above sets ups I've used - I noticed the Australian Army Tarp was a little small for these A-Frame civvy tents, so I ordered a British Army MTP Basha (Tarp). Its slightly bigger that the Australian Army Tarp, which will help cover an A-Frame mesh pup tent better than the Australian Army Tarp does during storms and cold winds. I also noticed the Australian Army mosquito net does more than just provide a micro climate during cold winters. Its also reduces wind and sand and dirt blown inside the sleeping capsule. Compared to the Chinese tent above which was full of dust within a few hours! It can get really windy out here in the desert!

This leads me to considering modding the Australian Army Mosquito net with a bathtub floor and adding YKK zip entry. My guess is it will come to 1kg if I do this. Heavy by your standards no doubt, and rather small by mine for the weight. Standard this net weighs 800g, which is heavy for what it is, but I've mentioned the advantaged too.

A challenging, but interesting topic nonetheless! Sometimes its good to think out loud, and more heads are better than one - especially this one!

Cheers and Peace,
Edward




P.S. Just FYI, here is the tent I camouflaged. I was testing this idea. It's a cheap Chinese deal I got on Ebay. Probably wasn't worth it. I had to do mods for it to work (had an upholsterer add extra tie out points). 2nd time I've been burnt on Chinese tents! NOT again. Its not that I'm a 'cheap skate', I just could find anything of quality I needed!
 

Kindliing

Les Hiddins
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
Messages
247
Reaction score
276

I’ve been looking at these oil cloths too on eBay .
If you buy the 3.6m x 2.4 instead of the 1.8m X 2.4 , you get twice as much tarp for only 20$ And if you wanted by rights could then cut it in half for 2.

Your list sounds like mine for the sleep setup .
we know what we need except not sure anyone makes it.

I’d like something of a mesh inner tent that hooks on by toggles or something to the hootchie or bigger tarp.
With closed ends that can roll open and a tub floor , built of course to military strong like standards.

getting the breeze through all 4 sides is really necessary .
Where the hootchie can be lifted up and down to close the gaps as needed .

we have unique Australian conditions and creatures ,i would like to be let loose in a tent factory for a day .
I bought a 30$ op shop sewing machine a while ago , and am contemplating modifying some kind of other style / shape tent myself .
 
Last edited:

Edward

Mors Kochanski
Joined
May 22, 2018
Messages
398
Reaction score
275
Location
Outback, South Australia

I’ve been looking at these oil cloths too on eBay .
If you buy the 3.6m x 2.4 instead of the 1.8m X 2.4 , you get twice as much tarp for only 20$ And if you wanted by rights could then cut it in half for 2.

Your list sounds like mine for the sleep setup .
we know what we need except not sure anyone makes it.

I’d like something of a mesh inner tent that hooks on by toggles or something to the hootchie or bigger tarp.
With closed ends that can roll open and a tub floor , built of course to military strong like standards.

getting the breeze through all 4 sides is really necessary .
Where the hootchie can be lifted up and down to close the gaps as needed .

we have unique Australian conditions and creatures ,i would like to be let loose in a tent factory for a day .
I bought a 30$ op shop sewing machine a while ago , and am contemplating modifying some kind of other style / shape tent myself .


Sorry, I missed this.

You make some good points.

They are nice looking traditional oil skin tarps. He's been selling these for a while. Rare to see them, especially here. Decently priced compared to some American Jobs, which can be outrageous! I wonder if he uses linseed oil as a waterproof sealant... I liked how Keith @Le Loup used the oil skin tarps center support beam also as a pot holder. Great idea!

Yes, I agree a mesh tent that toggled onto the Australian Army Tarp would be convenient. As you know the tarp has loups on the top, but not underneath. However, I have a BRILLIANT idea I thought up when studying knots on You Tube, you may wish consider trying, so you can suspend your mesh tent beneath your tarp, neatly.

Run a second, separate (semi) ridgeline along the top of your mesh tent and underneath the tarp, but don't connect it to the two trees like the tarp is, but connect it to the actual tarp's main ridgeline, either end and a few feet beyond either end of the tarp, using prusik loups to adjust the tension. I will use bank line for the semi ridgeline and 550 paracord for the main tarp ridgeline. You may need to make the ends of this second ridgeline fairly long so it sags a bit beneath the tarp. This will prevent the top of the mesh tent rubbing against the tarp and causing damage. Remember I haven't tried this yet it is just a theory. But I will be soon.

After brief testing, I have decided I will probably be adding a bathtub floor to the Australian Army mosquito net, the quality is just too good to pass up. I just have to find the right guage of floor material, tough enough but also reasonably light weight. Lucky you! - a man can accomplish a lot with a sewing machine. Let me know how it goes. I will start looking for quality bathtub floor material. I've considered using a green tarp from Aldi I saw cheap, or even a second Australian Army Tarp I brought cheap from you know who ;)

Thanks to all for their support and ideas!
 
Top