Plant Macaranga tanarius (Blush Macaranga)

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Common Name: Blush Macaranga

Botanical Name: Macaranga tanarius

Family: Euphorbiaceae, the Spurge family.

Other Names: Nasturtium Tree, David's Heart, Heart Tree, Bigleaf Tree.

Distribution: Native to N.E Coast Aust, SE.Asia and PNG. In rainforests.

Field Notes: Shrub or tree to 12m. Bark grey-brown.
Leaves large, rounded 8 to23cm with point, paler on underside.
Flowers small, yellow-green Oct to Jan. Fruit three piece capsule app 10mm dia. Seeds black.

Warning do not mistake for Giant Stinging Tree leaf which can grow nearby.

Uses: Ornamental gardens. Large leaves used to wrap food in for cooking in ground ovens.
Bark can be used for tanning. Branches can be used for spear handles.
 
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Hairyman

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Macaranga tanarius leaf(edit actually Omalanthus spp, Bleeding Heart tree. (left) compared to Giant Stinging Tree leaf (right)
IMG_1203.jpgIMG_1205.jpg

IMG_1206.jpg
Giant Sting Tree (foreground) Omalanthus spp (backgroud)
 
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Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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You have to wonder if its natural selection at work - two very similar looking plants, one nasty and one nice. A great protection from browsing creatures !
 

Stewart Townsend

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I would consider it as a "weed", not quite the right word.

They seem to have "runners" and a new tree will pop out of the ground.

I will try to get some photos of what I mean.
 

auscraft

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Macaranga tanarius also known as the Spear Tree
Aboriginal uses included the bark fibre was used for making nets and the light timbers from trunk made fishing spears.
And large leaves were wrapped aroung food for cooking in fire.
 

wallum

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Does anyone know of a use for the gum/sap? I have noticed rather large amounts exuding from both the dismembered branch and the tree wound when pruning this. It is water soluble and appears to possess some tannins.
 

Corin

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Does anyone know of a use for the gum/sap? I have noticed rather large amounts exuding from both the dismembered branch and the tree wound when pruning this. It is water soluble and appears to possess some tannins.
I found these but I have no personal experience with this plant being out of my region:

Latex from macaranga (Macaranga tanarius) is very
sticky and waterproof. It
can be used on deep cuts,
holding the skin
together like stitches.

http://www.wettropics.gov.au/st/rai...ces/Documents/TropicalTopics/Bushmedicine.pdf

and this one http://www.stuartxchange.com/Binunga.html
 

Aussie Forager CQ

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Hi All,

Thought I'd share a pic of some Macaranga here in rockhampton. Growing in a gully on Mt Archer.This is a good example of why it is classed as a good 'spear' tree, as mentioned above. Only good for light duty spears though, fishing and small game.





I have also heard of it being used for glue, as mentioned above.

Also good for friction fire as well.......
 

Hairyman

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Apologies, the plant originally pictured in my post #1 and #2 are not of Macaranga but of a plant in the same family
called Bleeding Heart, (Omalanthus spp, either O. nutans or O. populifolius).
Anybody have a close up of the leaf I can use? AussieForagerCQ has the correct plant pictured in post #9
 
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