Invertebrate Liocheles spp. (Bark scorpion)

Dusty Miller

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Common Name: Bark Scorpion

Scientific Name: Liocheles species (presumptive ID)

Phylum: Arthropoda

Subphylum: Chelicerata

Class: Arachnida

Subclass: Dromopoda

Order: Scorpiones

Family: Liochelidae

Distribution: Under this rock, SE queensland.

Habitat: Lives under rocks in forested areas.

Field notes: Small sting, white tipped tail, like rainforest scorpion L. waigiensis but less robust pincers. A good reason to empty shoes carefully in the morning. Australian scorpions have not been recorded as causing serious envonomations, likely not dangerous.

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bugman

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just thought i would let you know mate that is deffs not Liocheles australasiae they are extremely rare and alot smaller than that, the scorpion you have is a liocheles sp. but they cannot usualy be identified unless you put them under a microscope also the liocheses genus is still under revision so it would be better to just put this as "liocheles spp." nice find though and liocheles are really common right through the tropics. The species you have found is quite likley to be a new species that is how much the genus varies.
 

Dusty Miller

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Cheers, bugman. Yeah, wasn't sure thats why it has presumptive ID, since there are lots of scrpion collectors out there, I figured someone would correct it. the pincers are quite a bit smaller than the L. waigiensis common in brisbane. Don't have a book, and relying on blurry internet images for ID is a bit tricky. I'm pretty sure some things are mislabled too. Quite passive animal.
 
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bugman

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no problem mate, the specimen you found might just be a juvie of the common liocheles you find around brisbane. Also i will just let you know the one you find in brisbane is not likley L.waigienisis all liocheles have basicly been called L.waiginesis and if i remember correctly they are found further north than brizzy.
 

Dusty Miller

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How big do they get? I have never found one in Brisbane, just reading on net about someone who thought they did. This one was 250 km NE from Brisbane, different climate. Have to look for more in that area, and get a cam for the stereomicroscope. HAven't seen these before here, usually the small marbled scorpions.
 

bugman

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liocheles sp. scorpions can vary in size from 30mm all the way up to 100mm they are the most variable scorpion in Australia, they are found all over QLD and have been found even in the desert completly harmless aswell. If you are realy interested in finding out what species you could send the specimen to an expert but that is about the only way you will get it identified as many species are so closely related it just comes down to things like the spacing of the hairs on the body and things like that.
 

Dusty Miller

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liocheles sp. scorpions can vary in size from 30mm all the way up to 100mm
Is that body + tail length. I put it back, but would like to see what the size distribution is like in the area. Can yo recommend any good books or references for scorpions, too. Would be interested to learn more about the australian species, but there doesn't seem to be much online info. except maybe http://www.inverts.com.au/index.php
 
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bugman

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yeah to measure a scorpions properly its from tip of head to end of 5th tail segment (not stinger). the best and only scorpion book in true scorpion book in australia is a book my mark newton "a guide to keeping australian scorpions in captivity" it covers most species and biology and a whole heap of other things.

as for online information online you have found the best site but you would be going through that for months looking for the right informatin i have been a member of that forum for several years and have read most of the information on there.
 

Dusty Miller

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$36 seems reasonable might get myself one for Christmas. 2008 recent too. Cheers for that
 

Dusty Miller

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Found this totally massive Liocheles on the weekend, on my laptop screen, its about real life size. Body was almost the length as my first two finger joints.

 
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Dusty

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Very interesting thread here bugman and Dusty M. Invertebrates can definitely get complicated for the layman. I am finding scorpion posts just amazing. Thanks for putting scorpions on database guys. If I ever see one, will defintely be a WTF cause this is way beyond me.
 

Hairyman

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Found a nest of six these yesterday, quite robust and fat most of them.
Enough for a substantial meal if you were hungry enough.
 

Brumby53

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Not sure what genus this one Might be (?) Central Tablelands NSW 900M Scorpion and young. I was collecting rocks and uncovered these.
Creatures 005 edit.jpg
This one (adult) about 25mm long I have another example twice this size from the same location.
 

Hairyman

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No white stinger, a wild guess .. a forest scorpion, Cercophonius squama? Really need an expert with a microscope.
Cute babies!
 
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