Knots For Bushcraft

Blake

Nest In the Hills
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Thanks for the pictures BV and for the video GB. Hadn't seen that one. Great to see how Ray goes about it.

Agreed BV, I like where this thread is going, consider it stuck :sorrriso:
 

Smarteee

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My personal favourite, because a) it's an easy knot, and b) great for hammock suspension. Marlin Spike Hitch -

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Mickldo

Ray Mears
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Great idea for a thread.

I find different knots or different variations of knots are needed for different ropes/cordage. Natural materials like hemp or sisal work well with the standard knots but synthetic materials are a bit slipperier so they require modified knots. They may require an extra twist or turn (or four) or an extra half hitch.

With the truckies hitch I usually tie the top part with a half hitch that has two wraps around the loop and if that doesn't seem enough (synthetic rope or whatever) I'll take the loop at he top and I'll use it to tie a half hitch around the main line. My dad was a truckie and this is how he used to tie it all the time. Another thing he taught me while tying the truckies hitch was to never pull all the rope through the knot or through the rope rail on the trailer but to tie everything in loops. You can tie the whole truckies hitch including tying off the knot at the end with a clove hitch without pulling the whole rope through. This makes tying down a load much quicker as well as making it easier to untie later especially if you are using a really long rope. I hope this makes sense without pics or video.

The rolling hitch can be tied the traditional way or you can take the second loop (of the three) and lift it up and over the first loop so it bites down more than the standard knot. The knot is still tied the same as the normal one, the only difference is the position of the second loop. I find this works better when the standard one is slipping like when you use it to tighten your guy ropes on you tent/tarp and they slip during the night in a thunderstorm and you quickly want to make the knot better without completely retying it.

Clove hitches work well under most circumstances but occasionally when the load on the standing part of the line is too great a round turn and two half hitches would normally be better but I use a clove hitch with two half hitches instead.

If I need really good strength in knots I use abseiling/rock climbing knots or even fishing knots. I'll use double figure eights, prussick knots, alpine butterfly knots, double fisherman bends, blood knots, uni knots, etc depending on the application. Some of these knots have approx 98% breaking strain of the rope so for high load applications these are good to know.

I also like tying decorative knots just for fun, like Turk's heads or Monkey's fists.
 

Blake

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Here are some videos of different trukers/truckie's hitches for review:


In this video the presenter shows two knot variations. First he shows the truckers hitch in a standard configuration that I seem to find alot. Second he shows the truckie's hitch like mine but with the exception of only half a sheepshank, not double locked like in my illustration.
[video=youtube;TSVbEfcZ8ps]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSVbEfcZ8ps[/video]

In this video the presenter shows a truckie hitch with a half sheepshank which is tied off with a half hitch to lock it in place. He finishes off with two slippery half hitches I think (video is a bit blury)
[video=youtube;gcz-D0kxiwo]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcz-D0kxiwo[/video]

In this video the presenter shows a truckie's hitch as depicted in my illustration in the original post and then creates another pulley, making a double truckie's hitch. This is finished off with a clove hitch.
[video=youtube;drkcOzCjuuU]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drkcOzCjuuU[/video]

In this video the presenter again shows a half sheepshank truckers hitch and the full shank truckie's hitch. What is interesting is a 4:00 in he passes the rope though the pulley loop again to add more mechanical advantage. Never seen that before.
[video=youtube;HQFyR153mXI]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQFyR153mXI[/video]


It seems to be the consensus of the International Guild of Knot Tiers (had to look that one up :88_:) that if you aren't going to use the popular sheepshank truckie's hitch rather than tie a slippery knot for the pulley (which will be hard to undo) you should use a alpine butterfly hitch. I dont have a video for that being used in a truckers hitch but if someone does I would be most grateful.
 
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Cam

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Hi,

The version of the truckers knot I learned is a bit more laissez faire. Basically for the pulley loop you can just use a figure of eight or even overhand loop (figure of eight is easier to untie and extremely strong as far as I know). From there it operates the same as the diagram shown here - you run the working end through that as shown in the diagram here. You can then lock it off by tying it off to the target as shown here, or even do a couple of half hitches around the rope itself. Hope that made sense.

Also, with the larks foot (baseline prusik) and probably the full prusik - be careful when using nylon cordage as it can theoretically burn/melt through itself if the load is jerking about and applying friction.

I also learned an enhancement for the sheet bend - create a continuous circle loop (eg. Figure 1 in the Prusik diagram above) and then tie that doubled loop as normal, and then as an extra step pass the working end through the looped standing end. Now it can't slip, but might be vulnerable to nylon melt through as detailed in the larks foot/prusik sentence above. It shoulso be twice as strong since you have doubled the loop.

For a more conventional non-slip variant on the sheet bend you could use a stopper knot (eg. figure eight) on the working end of a conventional sheet bend. Stoppers can help to prevent slippage on any tie-off that might be prone to it.

You can also do two loops at point two of the sheet bend diagram for extra holding power.

Almost any knot can be made into a slipping knot by making the final lock into a tuggable line/loop.

Look up the figure eight - it is a powerful loop knot, stopper knot and join knot (for putting two pieces of rope together) all wrapped up into one - easy to untie too. It is a strong variant on the overhand knot

I have heard that double fishermans bend is one of the strongest ways to join to bits of rope together (please correct me if I am wrong).

I also recommend finding out about lashings - square, diagonal, and parallel.

Lastly - I suggest people look up 'common whipping knot' on Google - it is handy to know, though not technically a knot. (make sure you get the 'knot' bit in at the end of the search phrase - I shudder to think what might turn up if you miss it :) )
 
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Aussie Forager CQ

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Hi All

I thought I would share this little story here regarding the knot used as it is the main for the post, apart from a bit of a laugh.

So I purchased some offcut hair on leather and stitched up a pouch.



For those interested I used a speedy stitcher.



I have decided to put some of my things in this and carry it around. If my wife wasn't married to me, she would refuse to be seen in public with me and 'it'. I on the other hand think it is quite manly and normal. :)

The cordage is made from Hibiscus tileaceus and I thought id share the knot I used to open and close 'the pouch'. It has turned out to be quite practical.



It is a Strangle Knot with a Double Overhand Stopper Knot on one end.

To open the pouch you pull on the cordage without the stopper knot and to close you pull on the stopper knot. The Strangle Knot slides along the cordage yet still holds it in the desired position.



The Strangle Knot is ABOK #1239.

The Ashley Book of Knots is the abbreviation above and is considered by many to be the bible of knots and is used as a reference accordingly. I could not recommend this book any higher for those interested in Knotcraft.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ashley_Book_of_Knots





The Double Overhand Stopper Knot is ABOK #516



 
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