Iodine for water treatment.

Randall

Ray Mears
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I bought some pure iodine (well 99.8%) for water treatment. I realise that here in Aus (as well as se asia) our soils are depleted of iodine - so iodine for water treatment when needed should be a win win. So far I've never treated water (the luxury of being in isolated locations); but I want that ability to and not have to rely on boiling. Here's what I bought. It isn't the usual form of iodine that is used for water treatment, so I don't actually know how much is needed. If anyone knows, or any other hints or tips, I'd be thankful. I did do a search here, and there was talk about chrystals, which is actually a different form. The stuff I've bought is just iodine that's been prilled. However I did learn enough from here to confirm it is a good idea. One of the other options is chlorine (bleach). I do have a tiny battery driven gizmo somewhere (well, I haven't seen it for years) that I assume gets chlorine out of salt. I like the idea of iodine though.
 
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Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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I bought some pure iodine (well 99.8%) for water treatment. I realise that here in Aus (as well as se asia) our soils are depleted of iodine - so iodine for water treatment when needed should be a win win. So far I've never treated water (the luxury of being in isolated locations); but I want that ability to and not have to rely on boiling. Here's what I bought. It isn't the usual form of iodine that is used for water treatment, so I don't actually know how much is needed. If anyone knows, or any other hints or tips, I'd be thankful. I did do a search here, and there was talk about chrystals, which is actually a different form. The stuff I've bought is just iodine that's been prilled. However I did learn enough from here to confirm it is a good idea. One of the other options is chlorine (bleach). I do have a tiny battery driven gizmo somewhere (well, I haven't seen it for years) that I assume gets chlorine out of salt. I like the idea of iodine though.
If you really want to know all about "safe water" Randall, there are a series of posts on our group forum by a member who is a professional in this field.
http://neclhg.freeforums.net/thread/244/safe-water-paolo
Keith.
 

Randall

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Although, I think he misunderstands chlorine - see part 5. Or more likely I do. The smell at the pool which everyone thinks is chlorine means there is not enough chlorine in the water. Chlorinated water shouldn't have a smell, as far as I know, and if water is treated with the right amount, it doesn't irritate your eyes. Pool management systems play catchup - 50 people jump in and the whole chlorine balance is shot. This is why pools have signs to shower first, to minimise this impact on the pool's chlorine balance. If we jump into the pool relatively clean, there is a lot less for the chlorine to do. If we're all sweaty and dirty and piddle in the pool, the chlorine goes into battle. Basically you want some free chlorine in the water - this is reserve (excess) chlorine that isn't taken up with the battle. Water treated correctly with chlorine is pristine (so long as there is no particulate matter in it) - the smell and the eye irriatations etc are caused by chloramines. This is the smell of battle between chlorine and ammonia and unless more chlorine is added the battle will be lost. My time as a pooly wasn't totally wasted 🤣. I used to marvel at the clarity of the water in the mornings, before anyone had jumped in. So, if you add some chlorine to your drinking water, and after 30mins it smells like a swimming pool, you need to add a bit more and wait another 30mins. This is back to front to what he said. Small but important point. Bleach (sodium hypochlorite) is readily available and is likely to be used when something goes wrong with your usual water treatment, so it would be good to know how to use it.
 
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Randall

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🤣 Floaters are a pooly's nightmare.
 
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Bloffy13

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Yep, 10 years as an aquatic centre manager, know exactly what you mean. Gotta luv those blind mullet calls on the radio. Spent half a day once just walking around the pool with a scoop net after a particularly bad case of nappy exploditus......
Both iodine and bleach are good disinfectants but taste like $£1t.
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Thrud

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I have used potassium permanganate, the water tastes slightly sweet. I agree it is a very useful inclusion in your survival/FAK.
For a litre you need about 3-5 of the small crystals. Then wait for about half an hour after giving it a bit of a stir. I did have a video of this showing just how little you need, but can't find it.
 
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Randall

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condy's chrystals! There's something there harking back to my childhood I think :) I just had a look at what I have coming - it looks as though that can be used as an antiseptic too, maybe in the concentrated water treatment solution?
 

Bloffy13

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And a good fire lighter. Put it in a honkey nut, add a bit of sugar and crush it down hard with a stick. Seen it work more often than not.
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Randall

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🤣 I had to look up honkey nut. The whole thing was beginning to sound edible.
 

Randall

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Sorry. Gum nut, eucalyptus nut, etc.
Thought it was a universal term.
Cheers
Bloffy
Apparently it's a WA thing. I've lived in the kimberly's and never heard it there, so I'm guessing it's just in the south which also coincides with where the marri tree is. As a bushcrafter you'll appreciate the definition I lifted from the urban dictionary: "Useful for throwing at enemies or friends and family. " 😂 Your use of it though; it could be an incendiary device "sandgroper's fire bomb"; the bushcrafter's molotov cocktail? Tape a bit of gravel in the top to do the crushing when it hits the ground :D
 
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Radagast the Brown

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I bought some pure iodine (well 99.8%) for water treatment. I realise that here in Aus (as well as se asia) our soils are depleted of iodine - so iodine for water treatment when needed should be a win win. So far I've never treated water (the luxury of being in isolated locations); but I want that ability to and not have to rely on boiling. Here's what I bought. It isn't the usual form of iodine that is used for water treatment, so I don't actually know how much is needed. If anyone knows, or any other hints or tips, I'd be thankful. I did do a search here, and there was talk about chrystals, which is actually a different form. The stuff I've bought is just iodine that's been prilled. However I did learn enough from here to confirm it is a good idea. One of the other options is chlorine (bleach). I do have a tiny battery driven gizmo somewhere (well, I haven't seen it for years) that I assume gets chlorine out of salt. I like the idea of iodine though.
I keep some betadine in my first aid kit. 9 drops per litre is the ratio to treat water I believe. Keep in mind that some people can be allergic to iodine.
 

Thrud

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Thanks Radagast. I think most use 4 drops per litre, but more concentrated wouldn’t do you any harm(allergy excepted) you would probably need to use the Aqueous Betadine rather than the alcoholic(red bottle) Betadine, but either would do in an emergency.
 
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