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Improvised inflatable splint.

biggles1024

Rüdiger Nehberg
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This is of no use to me as a hammock camper, but I found it interesting nonetheless. I recall seeing a demonstration of a purpose made inflatable splint when I was in the army and we all were of same mind in thinking that it wouldn't last 5 minutes in the Australian bush. The arrangement shown at this link might be a bit more robust.
https://www.realfirstaid.co.uk/impr...MMY0qNv62qsHWDXytauws7WZGI_dzMWoYXhFmq2ftth-I
 

Randall

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Duct tape and cling wrap in a remote location. As a bushwalker having those things on an extended walk isn't realistic - perhaps they mean car based camping? I carry some 100mph tape wrapped around a tablet container that has vaseline impregnated cotton wool balls in it. There's probably about 1m of it? But who'd carry cling wrap? Along with all your other stuff? And cling wrap is easy to damage so that it doesn't come of the roll for any great length before tearing into various strips - hard to avoid in a full pack. It's a nice idea though. What is realistic is the bed mat, tape, and roller bandages. The roller bandages could take the place of the cling wrap in the above example - do it up pretty tight.
 

biggles1024

Rüdiger Nehberg
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The article clearly articulates the impracticality of carrying and using cling wrap which is why they advocate Stretch Wrap. That said, I really can't see what advantage any wrapping of the mattress provides so leave it off.
 

swampy99

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Here is a good PDF for an improvised air splint for a lower leg or arm fracture utilising the bladder from a hydration pack.
I can say this works as I have used this myself on a patient in the field who tripped and had a colles fracture of the wrist also known as a FOOSH (fall on outstretched hand) fracture. Applied this and gave paracetamol and ibuprofen for pain relief and once back at the cars drove to hospital as the patient was stable and comfortable and didn't warrant an ambulance.
 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
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Here is a good PDF for an improvised air splint for a lower leg or arm fracture utilising the bladder from a hydration pack.
I can say this works as I have used this myself on a patient in the field who tripped and had a colles fracture of the wrist also known as a FOOSH (fall on outstretched hand) fracture. Applied this and gave paracetamol and ibuprofen for pain relief and once back at the cars drove to hospital as the patient was stable and comfortable and didn't warrant an ambulance.
Nice one Swampy.
Remember to take deflate a bit if in a pressurised aircraft.
 

swampy99

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Nice one Swampy.
Remember to take deflate a bit if in a pressurised aircraft.
I did reply to this but it did not seem to show.
So i shall do it again.
Now this is an improvised splint that would be done by someone with a WFA ticket or has experience in dealing with trauma in the pre-hospital setting.
Then the patient will be needed to be evacuated out of the field to a place of higher care. This is by land, sea, and/or air. Now by air that will be 9 out of 10 times by a helicopter which are a non pressurised aircraft. it will most probably not fly higher than 1500m asl so the barometric pressure difference will not effect the splint. When I worked on air ambulances with patients that had been intubated the air pressure did not effect the tube seal or placement which is a lot more sensitive than an improvised air splint from a hydration bladder. But saying that if the aircrew paramedic thought it was not doing its job he/she would replace it with a commercial made one anyway.
 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
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Thanks Swampy, I agree with unpressurised aircraft, but even ETT can cause problems depending on how much pressure the cabin is set at. And saline can be used to inflate ETT instead.
 
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