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Mammal Hydromys chrysogaster (Rakali)

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Scientific Name: Hydromys chrysogaster

Common Name: Rakali

Sub-class: Theriiformes

Family: Muridae

Other Names: Water Rat

Distribution: Most of eastern Australia and Tas. Northern and southwestern WA
South eastern SA. New Guinea.

Habitat: Rivers, lakes, ponds and esturies.

Field Notes: Large rodent. Body to 37cm, tail to 34.5cm.
Hindlimbs webbed. Fur waterproof. Head flattish. Large wiskers.
Black-brown above, white-orange on belly.
Tail has white tip. Ears fairly short.
Usually seen at dawn or dusk swimming on water surface and diving frequently.

Source: Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rakali

IMG_2757.jpg
Photo by Hairyman
DSCF2182 (2).jpg
Photo by Dusty Miller
 
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XT John

Les Stroud
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Years ago in northern Victoria I saw a gigantic specimen, it was close to three feet long!
Had to sit and watch it for a while to make sure my eyes weren't playing tricks on me.
 
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Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Signs of rakali feeding, opened freshwater mussels and a cane toad on its back with the nontoxic belly chewed out.
Both near a small dam.

 

Bodge

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thank you Hairy, it brings back fond memories of fishing the rivers and streams in the south west as a lad, I still occasionally sit concealed near bodies of water to just see what I can see, but sadly haven't seen one of these for a while, I hope it's not because they make nice pelts like they do in Tasmania ^^
Bodge.

I might add that the fresh water mussel is under threat here the south west which may play a part to species numbers.
 
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