Homemade Tinder Tube/ Slow Match/ Tondeldoos

KayDee

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Evening everyone. First time poster here.
I've been experimenting with fire making, specifically flint and steel. And I've recently developed an interest in tinder tubes and slow matches. These last few weeks I've been trying to make one. I figured all I needed was cotton rope and some tubing and I'd be golden.
Man, I was wrong!
Turns out buying 100% cotton rope for the purpose is not easy! Every store I've searched has been a disappointment. Dollar stores, Bunnings, etc. ( I didn't try Spotlight because I fear it would be an expensive disappointment). Even buying online has been a gamble.
Either they have been chemically treated with flame retardant, or they have nylon/ polyester cores. Nothing I can find will smoulder. It's been frustrating.
I'm still experimenting and hopefully will have some success to share with you soon.
If anyone can relate or have some suggestions, I'll be pleased to hear from you.
 

Kiindling

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Hi , although I haven't tried it yet, I only recently this week read of the small copper tubing , with cotton clothes line cord dipped in oil.

I read it will start many fires for a long time.
I can't be more specific on the oil however 'more homework to be done' , and any treating on the cord I have as it looks to me organic enough :) really wouldn't bother me too much 'personally' if it was outside and only used as a match to light other tinder quickly.Obviously I would try not to breathe it in .




I have some of the cotton clothes line about , it may have even come from bunnings.
 
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Kiindling

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Actually where I read they had suggested it for bic lighter or ferro rod spark to light it as a prolonged fire lighting tool.
Flint and steel they didn't mention.
 

Aussie123

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Spotlight do sell 100% cotton piping. You can wash it if you are concerned about treatments.

They sell it by the meter and is quite cheap (check withthe sales person, but you can usually buy less then 1m).
 

KayDee

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same as what Mongoose said..100% Cotton mop, you can get just the mop bit from the Bunnings Bush Craft store :p

$13 and get a lot from it, its what i have used for oil lamp wicks :)

https://www.bunnings.com.au/sabco-450g-cotton-contractor-mop-head_p4480045

cheers Mozz
I bought that exact mop from Bunnings a few months back. And you are correct! And it does hold an ember well. By itself, it wasn't great for blowing a tinder bundle into flame. Maybe braiding several strands together might do the trick. I'll try it eventually.
 

KayDee

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Spotlight do sell 100% cotton piping. You can wash it if you are concerned about treatments.

They sell it by the meter and is quite cheap (check withthe sales person, but you can usually buy less then 1m).
Thanks, Aussie123. I might give it a try next.
 

KayDee

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I had a thought while at work.
I don't need rope per se. Why don't I cut some of the towels into long strips? I've made char cloth out of an old bath towel before. It worked very well. So they should work in place of rope.
I'll experiment tomorrow.
 

Aussie123

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Some of those old slow matches were treated with saltpeter (aka Potassium nitrate) to help them catch and burn, although untreated should work too, you may want to consider some kind of treatment ?

but here's an article with some other suggestions and ideas about slow matches :

http://pyrodata.com/PyroGuide/index.php^title=Slow_match.htm

(No affiliation)
 

Le Loup

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Evening everyone. First time poster here.
I've been experimenting with fire making, specifically flint and steel. And I've recently developed an interest in tinder tubes and slow matches. These last few weeks I've been trying to make one. I figured all I needed was cotton rope and some tubing and I'd be golden.
Man, I was wrong!
Turns out buying 100% cotton rope for the purpose is not easy! Every store I've searched has been a disappointment. Dollar stores, Bunnings, etc. ( I didn't try Spotlight because I fear it would be an expensive disappointment). Even buying online has been a gamble.
Either they have been chemically treated with flame retardant, or they have nylon/ polyester cores. Nothing I can find will smoulder. It's been frustrating.
I'm still experimenting and hopefully will have some success to share with you soon.
If anyone can relate or have some suggestions, I'll be pleased to hear from you.
Just use cotton cloth, plenty of second hand cotton in op-shops, or calico used to be inexpensive new. Just roll it until it fits neatly into the tube.
SCARCE ANTIQUE INDIAN - PERSIAN SILVER TINDER TUBE W- ORIGINAL WICK Etc c1800's.jpg
Keith.
 

KayDee

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Some of those old slow matches were treated with saltpeter (aka Potassium nitrate) to help them catch and burn, although untreated should work too, you may want to consider some kind of treatment ?

but here's an article with some other suggestions and ideas about slow matches :

http://pyrodata.com/PyroGuide/index.php^title=Slow_match.htm

(No affiliation)
Thanks for the article. Lots of info in there. Salt Petre soaked rope sounded like a good idea. Might try it later on if I can find somewhere that doesn't mind selling it to a loony like me.
I may have stumbled upon a cheap and dirty alternative. Details below...

Just use cotton cloth, plenty of second hand cotton in op-shops, or calico used to be inexpensive new. Just roll it until it fits neatly into the tube.
View attachment 25398
Keith.
Thanks Keith. Calico looks like a great option.


Alright, here's an update of what I've found this last week. I watched a YouTube video by David West. I highly recommend his channel if you are interested in friction fire methods.
He demonstrated how impregnating tinder with wood ash will turn it into an coal extender. I tried it on the weekend with some of the (non-flamable) Dollar Store rope I mentioned. It worked beautifully!!
I used the knowledge from his videos to apply to my own experiment.

I made a slow match using the method Aussie123 posted above. Only I substituted wood ash in place of saltpeter. Wood ash was sifted into a Nesquik container (No Affiliation):
IMG20180907200343.jpg

After 18 or so hours, I took our the rope and let it air dry for a day. Tested it this afternoon:
IMG20180909172949.jpg
It's not ideal. But it is holding an ember unlike its untreated counterpart.

I also tried some other materials with some excellent success:
Cotton mop from Bunnings (Thank you Mongoose and Mozzie for that suggestion)
IMG20180909161830.jpg

A cotton floor towel (This one surprisingly has not been fire-treated) :cool:
IMG20180909161205.jpg

The tubes themselves are Dynabolts, sourced from Bunnings.
And the extension tube pieces from a selfie-sticks;; I thought it might be easier to slide the tube up to cover the ember rather than pull the material in. It's working alright.

So there you go! Thanks for the info, everyone. Hope this is useful for you all.
-KD
 

Aussie123

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Looks like you've got the cotton sorted, but I was at the shops the other day and snapped this FYI
20180908_145731 (Medium).jpg
 

Chigger

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The things that come up on this forum, I must try out making a slow match myself which would be handy at a long term campsite.

Save wearing out flints every time a fire is needed to be relit.

Thanks for all of the information.
 
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