Hello there from north

Kindling

Lofty Wiseman
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Hi everybody ,
Glad to have found this place , was searching the net for bow making timbers and landed on a link , mentioning a couple which led to here .

Presently I have an old bear 76er recurve with hunting weight limbs I'm learning with. Picked up at a garage / shed sale.
Am keen to find some brigalow as I believe the member named jacko mentioned .

Apparently Townsville is upon the brigalow belt , so that's not too far away .

Apart from bow making ,

There's a few things, information I'm searching for regularly as things evollve ( curiosity) ,

One being if any body has any links or info with regards to Les Hiddins ( the bush tucker man )
' Snack maps'
Which his research with the James cook university collaborating also with the Australian army produced , working with the aboriginal communities all over .
Apparently the cards , can show for particular areas which foods are available .

Another recent search is for a native plant species , to combat stomach parasites , in the case of drinking contaminated water ,

I believe In north america sage brush in some water is very good and antimicrobial .
Although not sure its endemic here , so still searching for something .

Any way that's enough for now .

Glad to be here , will use the search function at top if page as much as I can .
Lots of content here to look through .
Amazed that a community like this even exists ,
Have been flicking through the web searching for bits and pieces all over the place , great that these resources are being collected and stored in one place :)
 

Bloffy13

Jon Muir
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G'day Kindling. Welcome to the forum. It is a great place to learn, ask questions and share your knowledge.
There are a number of bow shooters here who will be able to offer plenty of advice.
Ask lots of questions. There are a lot of friendly, knowledgeable people here who are more than willing to help.
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Hi Kindling, welcome aboard.

I'm not aware that the "snackmaps" are available to the public although some libraries may have them (eg Nat library in Canberra), but there are many excellent books available which would be much more useful for identifying plants.

I "believe" the JOG Australia maps (Joint Operations Graphic) (ie snackmaps) are either 1:100k or 1:250k and the plant descriptions are relatively large print, so any one map would only have a dozen or so plants. Most books would contain more than 100 plants for an area. The plants printed on a map are only a general reference and don't give specific locations etc.

The idea of the maps is that most soldiers would carry a map, but wouldn't bother to carry a book, whereas a bushcrafter / hiker can easily carry a book or a reference file on their phone / tablet !
 

Kindling

Lofty Wiseman
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G'day Kindling. Welcome to the forum. It is a great place to learn, ask questions and share your knowledge.
There are a number of bow shooters here who will be able to offer plenty of advice.
Ask lots of questions. There are a lot of friendly, knowledgeable people here who are more than willing to help.
Cheers
Bloffy
Thanks for the welcome bloffy .
 

Kindling

Lofty Wiseman
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Hi Kindling, welcome aboard.

I'm not aware that the "snackmaps" are available to the public although some libraries may have them (eg Nat library in Canberra), but there are many excellent books available which would be much more useful for identifying plants.

I "believe" the JOG Australia maps (Joint Operations Graphic) (ie snackmaps) are either 1:100k or 1:250k and the plant descriptions are relatively large print, so any one map would only have a dozen or so plants. Most books would contain more than 100 plants for an area. The plants printed on a map are only a general reference and don't give specific locations etc.

The idea of the maps is that most soldiers would carry a map, but wouldn't bother to carry a book, whereas a bushcrafter / hiker can easily carry a book or a reference file on their phone / tablet !
Thanks for taking the time to reply ,

That's probably not too bad an idea either re: the phone thing , I'll see if my technical abilities are up to it .
I do get the bush tucker books out from the library when I see them .
Many of them do seem to list fruit and trees as pictures or mentioning they can be used yet often times don't mention the how to of processing or ways to safely go about it , so I find myself steadily
Sifting through the information getting small pieces at a time then trying to confirm from other sources .


Slowly slowly building up a knowledge , looking .

Thanks again .
I'll head out and wander around the forum
 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
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Welcome! As you say there is a massive amount of information on this site; people are also very generous withe their knowledge.
 

barefoot dave

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G'day Kindling and welcome. I recall seeing the odd JOG map when I was in the Army. Before the time when I could be trusted with a map, so none of those in the map cupboard. X2 for the various 'Pocket Field guides' . They are often based on Les' work and keep them all together. Definately not survival guides as much shown require extensive preparation that isn't documented. "For info purposes only" ;)
 

Kindling

Lofty Wiseman
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Hi guys , and thanks.

Barefoot Dave , thanks sounds like it will be best to chase other sources for info then .
Appreciate the help
 

Randall

Ray Mears
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Hi everybody ,
Glad to have found this place , was searching the net for bow making timbers and landed on a link , mentioning a couple which led to here .

Presently I have an old bear 76er recurve with hunting weight limbs I'm learning with. Picked up at a garage / shed sale.
Am keen to find some brigalow as I believe the member named jacko mentioned .

Apparently Townsville is upon the brigalow belt , so that's not too far away .

Apart from bow making ,

There's a few things, information I'm searching for regularly as things evollve ( curiosity) ,

One being if any body has any links or info with regards to Les Hiddins ( the bush tucker man )
' Snack maps'
Which his research with the James cook university collaborating also with the Australian army produced , working with the aboriginal communities all over .
Apparently the cards , can show for particular areas which foods are available .

Another recent search is for a native plant species , to combat stomach parasites , in the case of drinking contaminated water ,

I believe In north america sage brush in some water is very good and antimicrobial .
Although not sure its endemic here , so still searching for something .

Any way that's enough for now .

Glad to be here , will use the search function at top if page as much as I can .
Lots of content here to look through .
Amazed that a community like this even exists ,
Have been flicking through the web searching for bits and pieces all over the place , great that these resources are being collected and stored in one place :)
Just found your post. I met Les quite a few times while he was still doing that work. I used to be in Norforce based in Kununurra. Yes, his last job in the army was the bush foods. The maps we used were 1:100,000 topographical, but on the back of the map was bush tucker information for the area covered by that particular map. Haven't seen or heard of them since, no doubt the army (norforce and sas) would still use them. He used to use the Kununurra base whenever he was close by. In reality though, if you're reasonably isolated up there, it's a piece of pie to catch cat fish in any of the water holes, or barramundi in the rivers (not close to towns). Firearm use is fairly strict, but you can also shoot donkey or camel - both pests - and smoke the meat. I don't know if you mean Les was also looking for plants to combat stomach parasites? If the plants were in the area and known, they would be on the map. The only problem with the water there during my time, were salties in certain parts of some of the rivers. I thought he only did those maps for the north of Australia (across the top). The theory was if we were ever invaded it would be via indonesia. The top of australia is still sparsely populated, so special army units were created (norforce is the reserve equivalent, SAS was the army proper) to be able to operate independently for extended periods of time, living off the land if necessary to supplement rations, or indeed for survival - hence the maps. Have you had any luck?
 
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Kindlling

Malcolm Douglas
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I've since managed to get a copy of les hiddens bush tucker field guide ,
Never did find those snack maps.
Also have a copy of his book 'bush tucker man stories of exploration and survival' now too.
I like that one as it tells the mistakes where people went wrong in their survival endeavours .
And where the priorities really lay.
I think that's as important as what to do. "What not to do".

I watch television survival series' and take note how they drop like flies, are over confident , and the proper rhythms and mind set.

I find that part fascinating too.

A lot of people around seem to know a little ,
Thanks randall , so if we all can share some thing it eventually all adds up.

Since you mention it , I'm wondering if anyone has any experience smoking meat and or fish in the tropics and how well it keeps.
 
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Randall

Ray Mears
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I used to smoke the donkey meat. Cold smoke, little strips hung on little bits of wire, fire in the side of a mound, smoke via 2 or 3m earthen tunnel into a box on top. The box had vents on top. It worked well. I don't have a lot of detail, that was about 1985 or 86? I never knew the meat to go off.
 

Kindlling

Malcolm Douglas
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Good stuff, I have actually seen a similar earth hole smoker set up to what you mention there done, so I understand what your saying .

Yeah there's catfish and tilapia too these days.

If it became a permanent type situation I'd opt for pig traps too.

Not the snare type so much,instead making pen types between trees , they can force their way into and can't get out.

Plenty of pigs around. I had success with basket traps for fish when I was a kid , there's big red claw around too. Fresh water mussels

Best bet is staying by the water.

Very lucky up here. Plenty of things to be aware of too. As you said the crocodiles. Even the plants, like gympie gympie .

It hurts
 

Randall

Ray Mears
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I've since managed to get a copy of les hiddens bush tucker field guide ,
Never did find those snack maps.
Also have a copy of his book 'bush tucker man stories of exploration and survival' now too.
I like that one as it tells the mistakes where people went wrong in their survival endeavours .
And where the priorities really lay.
I think that's as important as what to do. "What not to do".

I watch television survival series' and take note how they drop like flies, are over confident , and the proper rhythms and mind set.

I find that part fascinating too.

A lot of people around seem to know a little ,
Thanks randall , so if we all can share some thing it eventually all adds up.

Since you mention it , I'm wondering if anyone has any experience smoking meat and or fish in the tropics and how well it keeps.
During that time I had a book - I think it was "The SAS Survival Handbook". It wouldn't have been as relevant as the books you have because it covered all climates and all types of situations (world wide focus), because the SAS could be deployed anywhere anytime. It even had information about air travel, the safest place being in the tail of the plane :ROFLMAO: And there is an ancient book, a little red one. I think it was "The Australian Survival Guide". Very old. I'm sure many here will know of it :). I'm curious now if I still have them (many moves). The australian one would be interesting, considering it's age. Back again, I was wrong re the austrlian book, it is "Stay Alive: A handbook on survival". Still small and red. Published by the aust govt publishing service :). Awesome, found them both. Some reading ahead :)
 
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Kindlling

Malcolm Douglas
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I do remember the SAS survival handbook. I have had it at one time too. Possibly also still may have somewhere .

I've got one , not sure which.

Full of useful information, great to have in the backpack in any event, things like mental toughness , staying calm, basic hunting, navigation etc shelter ,water .

A good memory backup those type books.

Its good to have some gear and local and traditional knowledge.

Also , find the good knowledge in unexpected places, certain people are the real thing and live it without the hype.

Here's one example. On YouTube, this guy I've picked lots of tips up from his vids since discovering his channel lately.

Does the bush life at ease without the big hype of some.

He's the one who did the smoker I said I'd seen you mentioned.

Clay tall stories. There's some pig hunting on the channel , not solely though (not this vid) lots of other stuff to pick and choose. Very knowledgeable.

 
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