Hare Tracks

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Hare (Lepus capensis)

Photos taken about 10am after 13mm of early morning rain.
Note toes come to a point.

IMG_0206.jpgIMG_0207.jpg

South Burnett, Qld. Oct 2011
 
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21st century pict

Malcolm Douglas
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Brown Hare Lepus capensis.
6 inch scale.
.Hind feet.

Large track due to very soft sand.

.. .Bounding
,On this trail of a Hare, it was sitting on top of a small bank on very soft sand and then got disturbed “possibly by me” and with in two strides it was covering more than a meter per stride, up to 2.5 meters, travelling at top speed.
.
2.
same 2 tracks no2 plus 48 hours after wind and heavy rain.
.

Rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus.
All classic lagomorph.
....Rabbit Scrape.
 
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auscraft

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Great pics and use of tools to show tracks. I must remember to use these for future pics of mine, I have been lazy even though I wrote a thread on the use of them:)
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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The rabbit scrapes,... my brother and I joke that they are test pits to see if the soil is suitable for a warren.
Wonder what they are really for?
 

21st century pict

Malcolm Douglas
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I thought they were just digging up edible roots, found lots of hare scrapes which are much larger of course usually out in the open, but now I will have to have a closer look next time.
 
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Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Thanks 21stPict,
The first two pics look almost identical, no roots at bottom of hole though.
The third has some roots in the bottom but may be incidental, it looks very ceremonial.... If you can call taking a dump ceremonial.
My guess is scraps are territory marking, but I thought only rabbits did it?

Hairy
 

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No 2,Lost the image of the sand after cropping the image. I will look on my other pen for a backup image.
.close up of sand at scrape.

.
.#2 black rock.



Just thinking out loud..the Hare is a bit broader across the shoulders and that may account for the heart shaped holes above.

Question. Do rabbits have longer fore claws because they do more digging?
Q2. And do hares have shorter claws because they get worn down being used for grip while running?

As well as some roots, the 3rd image also has some pellets on the slightly raised sand hill just right of the scale, so possibly a territorial latrine?The pellets are also very dark which would also suggest this last scrape image is a Rabbit.

There certainly was a pungent smell in the area,but at the time I thought it was probably Fox castings ,however after reading ANIMALS Brown, Lawrence and Pope, on Rabbits and i Quote (territory-marking faeces are made pungent by glandular secretions)
 
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Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Thanks for the above 21sPict, I somehow missed your post until now.
I would think that rabbits are much more adapted to digging than hares.
And that rabbits can live in colonies while hares only seem to live in small family groups. This
would mean they probably have different reasons for scent marking....they are quite different animals when
you think about it.

Hairy
 
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