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Hand Chainsaw

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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I started with an old chainsaw and took the blade off
Then a used a generous squirt with WD40 and an old rag to clean it up a bit
I used a grinder and a punch to push out some of the connector pins (between the links)
20210328_144616.jpg

A simple wire handle from an old coat hanger ... and its ready to go ...
20210328_150400.jpg

The chain is blunt and still quite grubby, but it cut pretty well. I was impressed.
You can see it cutting through this dry log (above)

What I hadn't considered is that a chain saw runs in one direction, so all the teeth point forward
ie the blade cuts in one direction - only on the pull stroke.

A hand chainsaw has teeth pointing in both directions, so it cuts on both the push and pull stroke.
Much more efficient when hand sawing !

Also hand chainsaws have closer spacing between the teeth (ie more teeth per length) but as I say, this one cut quite well as it was !

I don't think I'll take it out bush, but it was fun to play with

Has anyone got any other ideas for what to do with the blade ?
 

Mozzie

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That’s interesting, I would not have realised, it’s not dual cut, of course it’s one direction.

wonder how it would go if you cut another link mid way and switched a seaction in reverse,
you would at least have half cutting on the push and pull.

great idea 👍


we have a big chainsaw, but I just bought a new Ryobi brushless 18+ for process of small stuff,
have to say it’s better than I expected, maybe a different thing when the chain get blunt tho.. time will tell.
 

Thrud

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MDU had a vintage military hand chainsaw that he demonstrated at the Boyup meet. Impressive piece of kit and a great upper body workout!
 

Aussie123

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...
wonder how it would if you cut another link mid way and switched a seaction in reverse,
you would at least have half cutting on the bush and pull.
....

That's a good idea - I think that would make it easier to use .... but which way to join it.
Cutting teeth pointing towards the join, or the handle ?

(The circles at the end represent the handles and the join point is in the middle)
saw1.jpg

saw2.jpg
 

Mozzie

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That's a good idea - I think that would make it easier to use .... but which way to join it.
Cutting teeth pointing towards the join, or the handle ?

(The circles at the end represent the handles and the join point is in the middle)
View attachment 28298

View attachment 28299

hmm not sure, :unsure: i guess thats the experiment, report back yours results ;)
 

Randall

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That's a good idea - I think that would make it easier to use .... but which way to join it.
Cutting teeth pointing towards the join, or the handle ?

(The circles at the end represent the handles and the join point is in the middle)
View attachment 28298

View attachment 28299

Awesome idea with the picture - it looks as though there is no advantage to either. To get a half stroke of sawing, you have to move the chain through a half stroke of no sawing. Essentially this is the same as the whole chain in one direction - full stroke of sawing, full return stroke of no sawing.

I was also going to make a hand saw with a sharp but well worn chain. Thankyou - you have saved me some time and educated me. I never knew that the purpose made ones were bi directional and with cutting teeth closer together etc. :oops::)
 
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Aussie123

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hmm not sure, :unsure: i guess thats the experiment, report back yours results ;)

Mozzie - you're definitely Management Material ! :D


Awesome idea with the picture - it looks as though there is no advantage to either. To get a half stroke of sawing, you have to move the chain through a half stroke of no sawing. Essentially this is the same as the whole chain in one direction - full stroke of sawing, full return stroke of no sawing.

I agree - the net result is each tooth cutting weather its on the forward or backward stroke.
The "benefit" probably comes from which is easier to pull mechanically. ... trial and error and a bit of personal preference !

I was also going to make a hand saw with a sharp but well worn chain. Thankyou - you have saved me some time and educated me. I never knew that the purpose made ones were bi directional and with cutting teeth closer together etc. :oops::)

I did a quick look online, to buy the joiner links (in Australia) costs as much as buying a purpose made hand chain saw !!!



There is another experiment I'll try and get done over Easter (with the chain in its current configuration)

..... then I'll try and cut the blade in half and bodge a linkage (it can't be too hard :unsure:)
 

Randall

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Mozzie - you're definitely Management Material ! :D




I agree - the net result is each tooth cutting weather its on the forward or backward stroke.
The "benefit" probably comes from which is easier to pull mechanically. ... trial and error and a bit of personal preference !



I did a quick look online, to buy the joiner links (in Australia) costs as much as buying a purpose made hand chain saw !!!



There is another experiment I'll try and get done over Easter (with the chain in its current configuration)

..... then I'll try and cut the blade in half and bodge a linkage (it can't be too hard :unsure:)
Hey aussie, what I was trying to say is that I don't think there is any advantage having half the chain facing one way and half the chain facing the other way. I think it is exactly the same amount of cutting time and time moving the chain through the non cutting part - it works out the same as just leaving the whole chain facing one way.

EG:
biderectional half / half chain = .5 stroke non cutting, .5 stroke cutting. So for the full length of the chain pulling in one direction you've only been cutting for half a length. To get an equivalent full length cut you have to move the chain through a full stroke in both directions - you will finish up back at your starting position.

one direction full length chain = 1 full stroke cutting, 1 full stroke non cutting. To get one full length cut you have to move the chain through a full stroke in the cutting direction, but then you have to move it back in the opposite direction ready to start the next cutting stroke. Again you will finish up back at your starting position.

Does this make sense, or have you already understood this and I'm a bit slow :LOL:
 
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