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Hammock camping in WA

Doc

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Well guys, here it is. This is a video I shot whilst off solo camping in the hills about 80 km NE (inland) of Perth last weekend. The area is very remote and beautiful and I hope you enjoy the scenery.
[video=youtube;cyn7pE6U6E4]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyn7pE6U6E4[/video]
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Hi Doc, Thanks for showing us around.

Have you checked out the database entry for Grass Trees (Xanthorrhoea) http://bushcraftoz.com/forums/showthread.php?111-Xanthorrhoea&p=403#post403
Ther are a multi use tree.

If you can reach the flower spikes, they will be dripping with nectar, especially in the mornings. With care, you can wipe off some nectar with your hand (there are sharp seed spikes, so be careful), or lick the stem, or my favorite method: use some dry grass stems as a little brush then wash its end in a cup of water - for a sweet drink.
 

Doc

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Thanks Aussie123 for the heads up the grass tree. There are many around my home and I will be following your recommendations:malefico:
 

Aussie123

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Its not just the sweet nectar, which is only available for a short time each year; there are plenty of other uses too.

If you carefully pull out some green leaves, you will get a small section of white pith atthe bottom, this can be eaten. Aboriginal people would destroy the entire tree and harvest a considerable chunk of white vegetable matter from the crown of the plants (but we can't condone that today because it kills the tree).

The dry leaves under the head will stay dry for a long time after rain, so its a good place for kindling in the wet.

The trunk oozes sap which can be scraped off and used as an adhesive (heat it to soften, as with pine trees)

The wood can be beautifully turned, with much difficulty !

The wood burns very hot - once again, its best left for the native creatures and not harvested by people.

The dried flower stems were used as extensions for spear shafts (a hardwood section glued and bound with sinue at the front)

The dried flower stems are also excellent for hand and bow drill fire lighting.

... perhaps that's some inspiration for the next vid ?

PS: if you watch the flower stems, there will be a multitude of birds and insects come to feed too.
 
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Doc

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Wow Aussie123, I knew of a few of the uses but you have really educated me about this exceptional plant! This would make a great video topic as you suggested.
 
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