Gymea Lily tips?

EucalyptusEvie

Russell Coight
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Hello! I'm wondering if anyone on here has any experience preparing and eating any part of the gymea lily (Doryathes excelsa).

I have three growing in my backyard to have a little experiment with. Now I've been looking into them and most sources say the same thing, the Indigenous peoples would roast the stem and roots for eating.
That's the most detail I can find!

Has anyone tried digging up the roots and roasting them? How did it go? How did you roast them and for how long to get the best effects? Is there any means of preparation to be aware of? Peeling, ect.

I'll update with my own experiments if no one else does!
 

EucalyptusEvie

Russell Coight
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Make sure you have Doryathes excelsa not Doryanthes palmeri
I think I'm too far south for the Palmeri, but I suppose it's hard to be entirely certain until they flower.
I've looked it up though, and I believe they're edible in the same way, unless you've seen something saying otherwise?
 

Howling Dingo

Richard Proenneke
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This is one of these just be really careful things..The nectar is edible and very yummy but the flowers are toxic.

The dried scrapes or flower spikes is really useful for shelter craft. The are strong fairly long but light but like bamboo. They are great for tipi style shelters.
 

Howling Dingo

Richard Proenneke
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I think I'm too far south for the Palmeri, but I suppose it's hard to be entirely certain until they flower.
I've looked it up though, and I believe they're edible in the same way, unless you've seen something saying otherwise?
I remember reading the Palmeri was not edible any info is welcome..
 

EucalyptusEvie

Russell Coight
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2624826249

Today is the day for some experimentation! I was surprised how easy it was to find the roots. I thought I'd have to dig deeper, but they were right below the surface. I managed to uncover it with just my hands.

Next I'm going to do some research in how to prepare it.
 

EucalyptusEvie

Russell Coight
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I'm going to cut the root I have in two and pound one half before washing and roasting both to compare the different modes of preparation.
It truly would be wonderful if there were more detailed information on the preparation of bush tuckers!
I will only eat a little in case there are toxins removed by means of preparation that I am unaware of.
 

EucalyptusEvie

Russell Coight
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Both washed,26251

Next I'm going to try roasting them in a few ways, following techniques you would use to roast any root vegetable. Since I'm doing this from home and don't have a fire pit, please excuse me for using an oven.

They're quite soft roots, so I think I'll treat them more like a carrot than a potato. I'll roast part of the pounded root and part of the normal root with just a bit of oil on them and roast another lot wrapped in some foil.
 

barra650

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Both washed,View attachment 26251

Next I'm going to try roasting them in a few ways, following techniques you would use to roast any root vegetable. Since I'm doing this from home and don't have a fire pit, please excuse me for using an oven.

They're quite soft roots, so I think I'll treat them more like a carrot than a potato. I'll roast part of the pounded root and part of the normal root with just a bit of oil on them and roast another lot wrapped in some foil.

Well if we don't from you tomorrow , we won't cook ours ( Jolly joke )
 

EucalyptusEvie

Russell Coight
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More experimentation needed. The pounded root was very fibrous. If it doesn't require pounding I do not recommend doing it.
The unpounded root was still quite fibrous, but it had some juice to it. Very odd texture actually, left a coating of slime in the mouth that lasted for a few minutes.
Tastewise it all tasted like the olive oil I coated it in.
I roasted it in the oven at 200 degrees C for approximately 50 minutes. It could have done with longer, I think.
The foil wrapped root was softer than the oil covered one. So I think this will be the way to go next time.
Another notable is a hard core in the middle of the root. Harder to eat.
I only had a wee bit of the unpounded root to see if it'll make me sick.
My brave mother wanted to join in the experiment and tried the pounded root. Going to look out for any ill effects, but then I'd like to try again, refining the process and eating more of it for a better opinion!
I still have no idea how to form it into the cold "cake" as described by the book Wild Food Plants of Australia by Tim Lowe.
 
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