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Guess who?

Randall

Richard Proenneke
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Don't know about the marks, and I'm truly hopeless at guessing, but it's an emu egg.
 

Kindliing

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Well if a goanna tried to eat it , and a male emu saw it maybe there will be scratches on a tree trunk nearby , or a goanna with some scratches on it
 

Mozzie

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Maybe a opportunistic fox Or dog, can I see canine marks, Thinking if it was A goanna, there be no egg but shells, goanna would not let much get in the way of its meal.
 

koalaboi

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Could the dad emu have scratched the egg whilst placing it/moving it around in the nest?
 

Randall

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Could the dad emu have scratched the egg whilst placing it/moving it around in the nest?
I've seen many emu eggs, none with scratches. I can't imagine what animal could bust open an emu egg, or know that it was an egg; they're really pretty tough. If you had tassie devils where there are emus, there wouldn't be any emus :ROFLMAO:. That could explain what happened to the tassie emu? A dingo could, I imagine; I'm not suggesting it was a dingo.
 

Thrud

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Mozzie is right, the fox has tried to drag/eat the egg by grasping it at the narrowest point of the egg.
Here is a picture of the culprit (as well as the victim of the attempted heist)

might need to play spot the fox...
 

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Mozzie

Richard Proenneke
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Mozzie is right, the fox has tried to drag/eat the egg by grasping it at the narrowest point of the egg.
Here is a picture of the culprit (as well as the victim of the attempted heist)

might need to play spot the fox...

Kool bananas, i win LOL :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

Thrud, was the egg punctured at all?,
im guessing not, also the egg would not be viable having gone from warmth.

do/ did you have a trail cam set up on the emoo nest ?

Mozz
 

Thrud

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You win Mozzie, but you have share 1/3rd of the prize with Randall, so I'm just sawing the Rolls Royce into the right portions it's quite hard work with a laplander, but I'll get there...

The camera is pointing in the rough direction of an emu enclosure but not specifically at a nest.
 

Randall

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I'm curious about this one. A friend flew down to Malaleuca for a hike (south coast of Tasmania). She sent back the picture below. Unfortunately I have no scale to give. If it was mainland I would have said emu. My best guess is a pelican, but the stride looks wrong (not a waddle) :(. After a friend of mine has been shooting Indian Mynas here - supposedly there are none in Tassie (there sure are a lot of dead ones though!), I'm now open to believing in emus here :LOL:

foot prints.jpg
 
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Thrud

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Difficult to say for sure, not a pelican or a swimmer as there is no webbing and there is a 4th toe segmented.
Walking gait, not a wader either as the tracks are not in front of each other.
Toe drag.

I'm going for crow, but that is a guess!
 

Thrud

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Randall

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nearest I can find in Australia are these: "Unknown Shorebird". https://www.thelanddownunder.com.au/wildlife/wildlife-tracks

Second row down second image from left.

or these https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/bird-tracks-on-sand-1337428292. Unknown bird, but the photographer is from the Ukraine, so probably not a bird unique to Australia!
Nice find! Yes, looking like a bird then. It had to be a bipedal toe dragger :LOL:. It seems quite a long stride. It's not typical water bird country down there - endless exposed beaches with nothing to slow the wind down from the antarctic. Not the sort of place for a heron.
 

koalaboi

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I've seen many emu eggs, none with scratches. I can't imagine what animal could bust open an emu egg, or know that it was an egg; they're really pretty tough. If you had tassie devils where there are emus, there wouldn't be any emus :ROFLMAO:. That could explain what happened to the tassie emu? A dingo could, I imagine; I'm not suggesting it was a dingo.

I’m certain that Tassie devils and thylacines were common on the mainland up until the arrival of dingoes about 5/6 thousand years ago. The remains of both have been found on the mainland especially in the big caves underneath the Nullabor plains. Aboriginal art of thylacines is also present in the NT. So emus survived and thrived with those 2 predators around.

Just the same, the question about tassie emus is an interesting one!

KB
 

Mozzie

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I will guess it may be a Tasmanian native hen

...deep prints so the bird is large set, nail drag indicates that it may be a bird that scratches and digs.
 

Hairyman

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I'm curious about this one. A friend flew down to Malaleuca for a hike (south coast of Tasmania). She sent back the picture below. Unfortunately I have no scale to give. If it was mainland I would have said emu. My best guess is a pelican, but the stride looks wrong (not a waddle) :(. After a friend of mine has been shooting Indian Mynas here - supposedly there are none in Tassie (there sure are a lot of dead ones though!), I'm now open to believing in emus here :LOL:

View attachment 28290
Maybe Ibis?
 

Thrud

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1E4642E7-475D-42C0-AEFC-101F55BC5352.jpeg

These are Ibis(and dog), I think toes in the tracks that Randall posted are closer together and there is more straddle.
 

Randall

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These are Ibis(and dog), I think toes in the tracks that Randall posted are closer together and there is more straddle.
Nice, but I don't think so. I don't see many ibis here - I've never seen them on the beach. They seem to be around farmland etc - near human habitation. The south coast of Tassie is as about as isolated as anywhere gets these days. It did make me think about geese though. Haven't seen them on a beach either - but I'm guessing whatever those prints are that they are not a common occurrence. That means that ibis could still be in the mix; I suppose the prints of the feet look too fine. But geese - they've got fat feet and legs to carry all that fat weight :LOL:. We get cape barren goose. Black swan could work too. I can't imagine what either of them would be doing there though - geese eat grass, swans eat algae and weeds generally under water? Cape barren goose would be the pick of those two. The stride in the original photo just looks longer in comparison to foot size. Photo below is of cape barren goose prints taken on Maria island

cape barren goose.jpg
 

Randall

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in the original photo, it looks like that is something behind the typical bird foot - like a toe facing behind or something. Those ibis prints show something like this too.

Just checked out ibis legs - they're pretty chunky too :LOL: , and long, and a backward facing toe. Looking good thrud. I'm back to heron - they have those toes too. There are places for heron down there - I didn't consider the river crossings. Louisa river looks like a typical hangout and it's sandy

louisa river.jpg
 
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Thrud

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Sorry, my post above was showing Ibis tracks, I was showing them as they are not what caused the tracks, this was in response to HM's post!

They are not goose as they are not webbed.
 
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