Greenlandic fish jerky

Wentworth

Bear Mears
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When I visited a fjord, I found many little huts that are used by Greenlandic hunters and fisherman throughout the year. One of them had a fish hanging up. It had been cleaned and cuts skiced through the flesh to help air dry it. It was a very windy location and seemed to have done a good job.
Later that day a hunter came, collected the fish and set out again. He had a permit for 4 reindeer.

Has anyone seen this technique or tried it themselves before?

fish.jpg hunter.jpg
 

Bloozz

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I've seen this a few times now on the TV series' set in Alaska. It seems to be fairly standard practice. I'm always surprised that the fish don't get raided by bears more because often their racks are fairly open with maybe only a roof - no building walls. I also saw one where the drying area was up on stilts so that predators couldn't get to the fish. Often it seems that the fish are dried and stored to be used as food for the sled dogs over winter.

Of course they can also smoke the fishe as well, but mostly not.
 

Aussie123

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I've seen this a few times now on the TV series' set in Alaska. It seems to be fairly standard practice. I'm always surprised that the fish don't get raided by bears more because often their racks are fairly open with maybe only a roof - no building walls. I also saw one where the drying area was up on stilts so that predators couldn't get to the fish. Often it seems that the fish are dried and stored to be used as food for the sled dogs over winter.

Of course they can also smoke the fishe as well, but mostly not.
I've seen it on TV too, mostly for arctic circle people.

The principal seems to be that the arctic air is cold, hence very dry. This means that the wind has the ability to dry the fish.

Some butchers hang meat in cool rooms with air flow to age it, ditto some hams etc are made by dry, cool hanging
 

pap11y

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Yep it seems to be the standard on Alaskan shows Yukon men being one of them.

The episode where I saw them doing it in detail, they would slice the fish, dip the fish in a brine and then hang it. I'm sure they prepared the fish for smoking in the same way (without the brine...).

The big question I have is what does it taste like...?
 

Bloozz

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The big question I have is what does it taste like...?
I'm guessing they would fit into the 'acquired taste' category - a bit like vegemite, if you've grown up with it then it can be a favourite, if not it's yukko.
 

JM9422

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When I make bacon, after curing the meat in the spices, honey, brown sugar. I leave the meat uncovered in the fridge for 24 hours so that it forms what's called a pellicle, a thin sticky film which helps the bacon take on the flavour of the smoke. It also stops the smoke itself from drying out the bacon. I think it would be the same principle with fish.
 

Aussie123

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When I make bacon, after curing the meat in the spices, honey, brown sugar. I leave the meat uncovered in the fridge for 24 hours so that it forms what's called a pellicle, a thin sticky film which helps the bacon take on the flavour of the smoke. It also stops the smoke itself from drying out the bacon. I think it would be the same principle with fish.
(Sometimes) Mrs A does something similar with steaks - leaving them uncovered in the fridge for 24 - 48 hours before cooking - Yum !
 
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